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auDA abolishes 6 month rule

Discussion in 'Tech talk' started by Neddy, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. Neddy

    Neddy Active Member

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    For anyone that is interested, the Aussie domain market is really starting to loosen up.

    There has been a prohibition on selling newly registered domain names, or those that were picked up on the drop auctions. You have had to wait 6 months before you can sell these names.

    But as from November 10, this is all over - no more 6 month rule. :)

    http://www.auda.org.au/news-archive/auda-06102011/

    I was one of the members of the Secondary Market Working Group, so it is simply fantastic to see our recommendations come to fruition.

    In my opinion, this change in policy will make the domain aftermarket go into absolute overdrive.

    If you have been thinking about securing some domain names for your business, don't delay would be my advice.

    Cheers, Ned
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  2. Samith

    Samith Active Member

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    Honestly, I can't see why this is a positive change? getting rid of the 6month rule will only push people to buy domains solely for reselling, can't see how that's a good thing. Domain squatting is web spam, we should influence decisions that will discourage domain squatters, not influence them. #my2cents
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  3. Chris's Signs

    Chris's Signs Active Member

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    iam guilty of buying a domain name to re-sell, that was 5 years ago and when i relised i couldnt sell it i let it expire...
    was called myebay.com.au
  4. Samith

    Samith Active Member

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    Domain buying is like an addiction, I have a few domains I haven't even touched yet, I'm trying to let all my non used domains to drop and never to buy again (unless I'm really going to use them for something other than resell)
  5. Neddy

    Neddy Active Member

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    We live in the free world were there is supposedly no restriction on trade or commerce. Anyone can buy and sell real estate; or number plates; or any other commodity. Why shouldn't people be able to buy and sell domain names (as long as they are not infringing on anyones IP or TM)?

    It's been happening in the .com market for years - and closer to home, New Zealand has never had any restrictions. Nor has the UK. There doesn't seem to be any problem with their markets?

    What auDA has done is also sort out a discrepancy that exists at the moment. Currently if you buy a domain name that has been registered for over 6 months, you can sell it tomorrow. But if you buy or register a new domain name - or purchase one on the drop auctions - you couldn't sell this for 6 months.

    So the analogy is a bit like if you bought a second hand car you can sell it tomorrow; but if you bought a brand new one (or maybe a second hand one that went to a public auction) you couldn't sell this for 6 months. :confused:

    If you want to understand the overall reasoning of auDA, it best to read this final report: http://www.auda.org.au/pdf/smwg-final-report.pdf

    This is an excerpt:

    2 people like this.
  6. victorng

    victorng Well-Known Member

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    The rule was senseless and it's good to see it finally done away with.

    Does anyone really believe that the rule has / had any effect on domain squatting? A domain squatter is out there trying to effectively extort money from rights holders. They are hardly going to be put off by the 6 month rule (the issue is with them registering not transferring!). It's got to be one of auDA's most misconceived policies - good riddance to it.

    Someone who buys and sells domains or buys and monetizes domains is not a squatter. If I buy an investment property or buy a beach house which I only happen to use twice a year am I a property squatter who should not be allowed to buy property because other people might want it?
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  7. Neddy

    Neddy Active Member

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    Well said Victor.

    Samith, the other thing to remember is that probably 99% of legitimate "domainers" (people who buy, develop and sell domains for a living) hate unscrupulous cybersquatters as much as anyone. Why? Because those few rotten apples spoil it for others.

    Putting that into perspective, it's the same in any industry.

    Imho.
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  8. Samith

    Samith Active Member

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    I don't really want to annoy you guys, but that comment is a bit misleading. If everyone is allowed to buy and sell anything they like without regulations, that's not really a step forward, more like going back to the stone age.

    An "ethical" trade and commerce environment would be a step forward, just my 2 cents.
  9. Neddy

    Neddy Active Member

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    Samith, you should take the whole post in the context it was meant.

    I was more talking about the concept of free trade. The right to buy and sell what we choose. I didn't say that there shouldn't be rules and regulations when it comes to "trade and commerce". ;)

    All I was pointing out (in the first place) was that auDA have got rid of a rule that was quite inequitable.

    Cheers, Ned
  10. DigitalDomination

    DigitalDomination Active Member

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    I'm not too sure how many people this is really going to affect, and if that affect is going to be detrimental to anyone.

    Less legislation should be something we strive for, especially nonsensical laws.
  11. BrettM33

    BrettM33 Renowned Member

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    There is nothing wrong with buying and selling domains unless you are infringing on other peoples IP Rights.

    Too many people like to call any domain seller a squatter. Get off your high-horse people.
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  12. Samith

    Samith Active Member

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    My idea is that domains should be free to buy by the people who actually need them and for a reasonable price, when you encourage domain resellers you are effectively creating a middle man situation where you'll have to pay a premium for purchasing a domain otherwise you could have bought for less than $50, soon enough all 3-4-5 word domains will be bought by domain resellers just like what's happening in .com market.

    I know I'm not going to win this argument or my comments will have any affect on the evolving domain aftermarket, but this is what I believe :) #my2cents

    Cheers!
    Sam
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  13. BrettM33

    BrettM33 Renowned Member

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    Why? Why should domains be any different to land or houses? The best analogy for domains is land; domains act as the land to the website whereas land acts as the land to the house. So in your argument the only people that should own land are the people that have a use for it at that moment..... no investing allowed!
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  14. The Infotainer

    The Infotainer Active Member

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    you have won the argument with me, I 100% agree with you
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  15. Printerboy

    Printerboy Member

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    One side of the argument: Frustration when I sell teapots and my domain has to be www.teap0t5_0451_"11".com.au (maybe a bit over the top)

    I agree here that its ridiculous and it blocks business users access to a tool that has been used by someone who does not intend on using it.

    To argue free trade is fine, but if that is the case I think that domains should then be priced on demand, and essentially would be far greater initial cost?

    Example: If land prices were a set value at $100 then I would say a law should be required that if you buy a block then you must build it. Condor based on this you'll have to live in the dessert in Australia because all the Land (domains) will be bought?

    I think this topic needs to be rethought!

    Ben.
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  16. BrettM33

    BrettM33 Renowned Member

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    No, you won't have to live in the desert. If you want a CERTAIN piece of land then you will have to BUY it, if you don't want to shell out the cash then you can't live there and will have to settle for something that is available elsewhere that no-one else is interested in (living in the desert).

    It's just because it's on the internet and people like things to be free on the internet that they go and get their knickers in a twist about it all.
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  17. victorng

    victorng Well-Known Member

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    Who gets to decide who actually needs a domain name? And who decides who has a greater need if there are two people with competing actual needs?

    Who decides what a reasonable price is?

    A domain name isn't a business tool. It's online property.

    I think it's ridiculous that there's an empty office space in a great part of town and the landlord (who isn't using it) is blocking my business from using the space and expects me to pay money to use it.

    What does a 'far greater initial cost' have to do with demand / market pricing?

    Aftermarket domains are priced on supply and demand. You pay what a willing owner is prepared to sell for (kinda like property prices - funny that). Dropping domains are priced on demand. If only you want it, you pay next to nothing for it. If lots of people want it, you pay lots for it.

    Getting back on topic, in any event the 6 month rule is / was of no help to those who feel entitled to a domain name just because they were too late to register it or were silly enough to not check availability before choosing a business name.

    Cheers,
    Victor
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  18. HamishBorthen

    HamishBorthen Member

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    I think some of the analogies to property are pretty far off the mark.

    When I want xyz.com then there is ONE of these and perhaps a few minor variations. If I want a 4 by 2 in my favorite suburb there are dozens/100's of pretty much the same thing. They all have a slightly different flavor but I guarantee you my my family will fit into the all just as well.

    However when I'm selling a certain product or discussing a certain topic the variations on domains often won't. So I'm forced to pay a much higher price because the previous owner knows I have no choice.. I can't just go down the road and pick another.

    And who says you SHOULD be able to sell these like property? I guarantee you the boffins who put together the internet didn't do it to turn it into one gigantic market place for people to profit..

    Now I should say I'm also a complete hypocrite in this argument because back 5-6 years ago when I could manipulate Google I was making some nice coin catching dropped domains and "Squatting". I still felt a little bit dirty at the time and the IT nerd forefathers would be frowning on me.

    Anyway; I know moral high horses aren't welcome in a commercial forum so I'm going to get off mine. I'm a realist also and figure since it can't be regulated anyway it may as well be a open market. Just remember when you do invent a new product give it a odd name.. because it's the only way you'll get the domain :)
  19. Neddy

    Neddy Active Member

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    I didn't mean to stir up a hornet's nest with my post about auDA abolishing the "6 month rule". :) It was just informing members that we're getting into sync with other worldwide domain name extensions.

    But for what it is worth, I post this link to what I think is a really good article about the value of domain names (cyber property). In this article, the authors ask this question of those that perhaps think that domain names shouldn't be treated as other assets are.

    http://domainnamesales.com/WhyPremiumDomainName.pdf

    And Netfleet have also posted a great article about why generic domain names are valuable.

    http://www.netfleet.com.au/Why-Are-Generic-Domains-Valuable.pdf

    I don't mean to provoke - I just want to show you another point of view.

    Cheers, Ned
  20. Neddy

    Neddy Active Member

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    As from today, the 6 month prohibition on domain registrant transfers is officially "dead and buried". :)

    Another good thing that has happened is that the cost of transferring a domain to another person or entity has been incredibly reduced by one company - VentraIP.

    Some registrars still charge hundreds of dollars for doing this, but VentraIP have reduced this cost to just $19.95 - plus this includes a further 2 years registration!

    You can read about it here: http://www.dntrade.com.au/free-au-change-registrant-cor-t4089.html?t=4089

    Well done VentraIP!
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