Marketing / Business marketing

Preparing your elevator statement

It is good practise to develop an elevator statement or elevator pitch, namely a short, sharp summary of your business that could be delivered in the time it takes to go a couple of floors in an elevator.

15 November 2005 by

That’s because while it’s exciting when you get to the point when you can talk about what you do and where you’re going openly and with more confidence, getting people to appreciate what you do and that you’re open for business – in a conversation sense – can be really difficult.

You need a script: something that’s been tried, tested, practiced and something that speaks in your voice. No, I’m not talking about robot-mode patter when someone asks you the golden question. It’s about having a deep-down, soul-connected sense of who you are.

To create your elevator statement, take a good hard look at your business plan, your goals and your current position. You’ll find that all you need is there: in your plan and in your mind already. It’s why you started in the first place, remember?

Think hard about what you stand for, what are the messages you want to use that reinforce that idea and a couple of the best examples of the work you have done.

"Think hard about what you stand for, what are the messages you want to use that reinforce that idea and a couple of the best examples of the work you have done."

Practice these every time you talk or write about your business. Soon enough, it becomes second nature and your enterprise starts to sound really grown up!

Want more articles like this? Check out the  business marketing section.

The first few times you try your elevator pitch out, you’ll get well-meaning nods, hmmss, and perhaps what I call ‘screen saver eyes’: brain in holding pattern.

But you’ll get better at it. Particularly if you spend time in your business plan really honing the principles and central core values of your business.

In next to no time, you’re rolling it out with a golden tongue.

The best part about this exercise is that it forms the basis of your communication toolkit – the ideas and concepts that underpin your company ‘look and feel’.

More on the communication toolkit in my next article.

The harmony between your elevator pitch and your business’ identity can be a really strong signal about your individuality and passion, and can become one of your strongest selling point. It will also make referrals from your raving fans so much easier.

Try it. You’ll be surprised.

Jess Tyler

is passionate about helping innovators find their voice and about helping clever organisations to create their own marketing rules.

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