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Peter – FS Administrator
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Johny, post: 262627, member: 34822 wrote:
Peter – HAHAHA

Everything old is new again. Very fashionable in downtown country Qld in the 70’s/80’s.. Probably made to last all of 10 minutes these days, but once upon a time were virtually indestructible. The equivalent where I am is Converse and now even they have taken what is a very basic shoe and tried to turn it into a fashion item, purely to add margin. Not sure how well it is working.

Yes, Converse has a similar cool to uncool to cool story that seems to go in waves. The canvas Converse boots do seem to be the show of choice for my teenage kids. Vinyl records sales are bouncing back too apparently :)

If I am to be honest, I am not sure I agree with this.

I reckon people want good, but when they find out how much “good” costs, they will settle for average, then complain about it.
I reckon people demand reliability, but don’t practice what they preach when it is their turn.
I reckon people say they want relationships, then complain they are too busy to spend the time developing them.

OOH! I better stop. I reckon I have already earned the title of Mr. Grumpy today.

Haha! I don’t think it’s grumpy to disagree, and I do very much take your point. In general (probably the vast majority??) people aren’t prepared to pay for quality for most things. I was talking to a builder yesterday who lamented that if he was to include top quality ‘everything’ (fittings/fixtures/finishes etc) in his quotes he would rarely win a job as he would be 20% more expensive than others – even though he knows they would love the result long term. So as a craftsman he has to make compromises that clients may then complain about down the track :(

That being the case, I think as a small business owner the marketing challenge is to work hard to find those minority of ideal clients/customers that do appreciate quality (if you can demonstrate that what you offer is worth paying a premium). It’s not easy to do. And as has been said, blasting out digital content won’t always find the cream.

But if you want to be at the high end of the market (i.e. not compete on price alone), you need to let other people service those bargain hunters in the middle, and find ways to draw out the top end prospects. One description I have suggested people aim for is “they’re really good, but not cheap”, or even “expensive but worth it”.