Home – New Forums Tech talk A three horse race again?

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  • #978629
    Uncomplicating
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    They may well be a long way behind in the tablet stakes, and Windows 8 is still a long way short of being commercial grade, but Me$$ysoft have just announced their new tablet.

    It’s not quite a tablet and it’s not quite an ultrabook. It’s touch screen, it has a keyboard, it has a pen/stylus, and it is, apparently, a fully functioning PC.

    This may well be of minimal interest to the man in the street who really just wants to browse the internet, play games, and read books, and is therefore entirely happy with his iPad or Android tablet. But for commerce, this is pretty much the missing link; it’s Windows and Office on a tablet and that’s tantamount to corporate computing heaven.

    Time will of course tell whether this is REALLY what it appears to be, but if it is, they’ve played a blinder.

    #1108395
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    Here’s PCWorld’s view of their limited time with “Surface” as it’s being called.

    Important point of note if the full sized USB port.

    Interesting times indeed

    #1108396
    bluepenguin
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    I was having a peek at this earlier today.

    I’m really surprised by all Microsoft’s new stuff – they seemed to be behind the 8 ball for quite a while with the rise of Apple and Google, but it really looks like they’re about to give them both a real good punch in the guts in the next few months.

    #1108397
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    bluepenguin, post: 120455 wrote:
    I was having a peek at this earlier today.

    I’m really surprised by all Microsoft’s new stuff – they seemed to be behind the 8 ball for quite a while with the rise of Apple and Google, but it really looks like they’re about to give them both a real good punch in the guts in the next few months.

    For MS, the big black cloud they were under may well have a very silver lining.

    They were slow to spot the tablet potential, but not being a player in the game has allowed them to regroup and reconsider their strategy.

    No one thus far has really supported day to day computing on tablets. It’s generally, games, internet and commercial apps. All good stuff for sure, but no use for SME.

    Developing for Apple products is monstrous for small IT departments. First they need to get to grips with Objective C, which is a monster if it’s not your background, and secondly you have to get past the Apple Appstore Stasi just to get you app out there.

    And Android isn’t much better. Getting in the store might be easier, but you’ve gotta learn Java, and like Objective C, if you’re not from the world it’s a disaster waiting to happen. There were countless Java “rewrites” back in the late 90s that were nothing other than money pits.

    Windows 8 will change all that. MS has had to be grown up and pull the plug on a couple of things, but Win 8 will make the world of tablet apps much more achievable.

    IF!!!! MS can get Win 8 right, and the signs are good, they will corner the corporate market. And while Apple rule the school currently, we must bear in mind that most tablets have a battery life of about 3 years and many will be replaced with the latest and greatest.

    It will be interesting to see how many home users replace their tiring iPad with a new Windows tablet this Christmas.

    #1108398
    Greg_M
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    Why would you want a keyboard and a stand on a tablet?

    My experience is that people love their tablets because they’re NOT a computer, there’s no peripheral crap to manage, they generally just work, they’re user friendly, do what you want them to do and come with simple access to easy to use, specialised apps for whatever you want to do with them … this includes many business people I know, using them as part of their daily routine. They do the heavy lifting on another machine … or better still, delegate it.

    If you want a keyboard and all the trimmings in a portable package, I’d always go for an ultra light notebook, a la MacBook Air, or what ever your preferred OS flavour is.

    While your comments on developing and distributing apps for IOS and or Android have some merit, I can’t see Microsoft being any easier to deal with, many developers are more than happy that Microsoft and it’s platforms are no longer the ” guerrilla in the room” when developing apps or software.

    Ultimately the market will decide … as always.

    #1108399
    Geronimo
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    My money is on MS’ tablet strategy being the big winner. At the moment neither apple nor android play nicely in the commercial space (corp security etc). They are islands in corp environments. MS gets the corporate space, and if their tablet suits, it will be a huge winner.

    #1108400
    Anonymous
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    Uncomplicating, post: 120465 wrote:
    For MS, the big black cloud they were under may well have a very silver lining.

    They were slow to spot the tablet potential, but not being a player in the game has allowed them to regroup and reconsider their strategy.

    No one thus far has really supported day to day computing on tablets. It’s generally, games, internet and commercial apps. All good stuff for sure, but no use for SME.

    Developing for Apple products is monstrous for small IT departments. First they need to get to grips with Objective C, which is a monster if it’s not your background, and secondly you have to get past the Apple Appstore Stasi just to get you app out there.

    And Android isn’t much better. Getting in the store might be easier, but you’ve gotta learn Java, and like Objective C, if you’re not from the world it’s a disaster waiting to happen. There were countless Java “rewrites” back in the late 90s that were nothing other than money pits.

    Windows 8 will change all that. MS has had to be grown up and pull the plug on a couple of things, but Win 8 will make the world of tablet apps much more achievable.

    IF!!!! MS can get Win 8 right, and the signs are good, they will corner the corporate market. And while Apple rule the school currently, we must bear in mind that most tablets have a battery life of about 3 years and many will be replaced with the latest and greatest.

    It will be interesting to see how many home users replace their tiring iPad with a new Windows tablet this Christmas.

    Yes getting apps on the Apple store can be a real problem and learning Obj-C is no fun. Android is better and java does present some problems if you don’t know it. But MS is just as bad, you have to know .NET and C# is based on java and c++ and how many different versions of WIN 8 will we have to work with?

    MS always seem to be late to the market, look at their efforts with the Internet and web browsers.

    And before any one asks No I am not anti MS.

    #1108401
    John C.
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    clive, post: 123909 wrote:
    Yes getting apps on the Apple store can be a real problem .

    There’s no need to upload an app to the Apple App Store if it’s intended for internal employees only. It’s possible to host the app on an internal server or even email it direct to up to 100 devices. For companies with more than that number, there is an Enterprise developer program – https://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/enterprise/

    Cheers,
    John

    #1108402
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    estim8, post: 123840 wrote:
    Why would you want a keyboard and a stand on a tablet?

    Don’t know about you, but I reckon a tablet with complete office functionality should adequately answer your question.

    #1108403
    nominal
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    bluepenguin, post: 120455 wrote:
    … with the rise of Apple and Google, but it really looks like they’re about to give them both a real good punch in the guts in the next few months.

    I also have a feeling MS has a few aces up their sleeve… lately I have had a lot of work done on a MacOS side by side with Window 7 and I can see how the Mac had a few good ideas, but it seems that MS took some of it and made it even better.

    Windows 8 looks super cool and we’re already working in bringing some of their new concepts into our product.

    #1108404
    Craigv
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    There are rumours it could sell for $199 US. That would be a game changer.

    #1108405
    Zava Design
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    Uncomplicating, post: 120465 wrote:
    Windows 8 will change all that. MS has had to be grown up and pull the plug on a couple of things, but Win 8 will make the world of tablet apps much more achievable.
    As someone who project managed some fairly significant iPhone & Android app projects, and then had MS approach our agency to replicate a certain TV show’s app we had built in iOS/Android for the MS platform prior to their launch, I can tell you that developing for their platform is no where near as smooth a process as either iOS or Android. I really don’t see it taking off outside of essential office apps they may developer inhouse.
    #1108406
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    Zava Design, post: 127909 wrote:
    I really don’t see it taking off outside of essential office apps they may developer inhouse.

    It’s easy for an individual to change from Mac to Windows to Android. It’s a major undertaking for a corporate IT department to do the same. I see this time an again with 20+ year old applications that are still doing the job. Even stuff built in the 80s is still going strong.

    And I think that’s their point. Not a few hundred thousand apps in a store, but millions of little in house corporate apps that will last for decades, rather than games and stuff for individuals that cost almost nothing and get thrown away when the trend changes.

    MS sell licences. That’s their business. This will give them an almost guaranteed revenue stream for many, many years to come

    #1108407
    Zava Design
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    Uncomplicating, post: 127925 wrote:
    MS sell licences. That’s their business. This will give them an almost guaranteed revenue stream for many, many years to come
    But corporate applications won’t be developed for a platform, they will be developed agnostically, even cloud based. That is the future, not developing windows apps.

    I’m more of the opinion (as some others are) that MS may be making a really big mistake by changing their desktop UI so drastically with Windows 8. I can see whole IT departments doing just as they did with Vista, and ignoring it altogether. Then Windows 9 comes out and it’s more like the desktop everyone knows, and we’re back to how it was.

    I will state it right now: Windows 8 for mobile will not gain a significant user base, and they will either support it as a minor system as they did their previous mobile OS, or realise that desktop and mobile require two different kinds of OS and separate the two again and revamp mobile completely. Again.

    MS lost touch years ago, and this is no different. Good article here about them continually missing the boat: http://www.vanityfair.com/business/2012/08/microsoft-lost-mojo-steve-ballmer

    #1108408
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    I use Macs and love them – my husband’s business relies on PC. This month he upgraded the remaining computers to new ones with Windows 7 (old ones were XP). The staff were already used to using a dual mouse/touchscreen with Windows 7 for the main computer, so they were ok with everything going Windows 7.
    But there is no way that they would go with Windows 8. It will be hard to get used to easily and one of the applications they use is a database that goes back to very early windows (Lotus/Approach) and thankfully still works well on Windows 7. They once tried Vista and got rid of it because nothing worked properly and went back to XP. So changing to Windows 7 was a big enough change for them. And all of the staff hate the way MS has changed Word from something simple to something that is hard to navigate for those who are not very computer literate.

    So, I agree with the thought that most businesses will skip Windows 8 and wait to see what Windows 9 will do and how well they will be able to upgrade their reliable programs in a user friendly way.

    .

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