Home – New Forums Tech talk A three horse race again?

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  • #1108424
    Zava Design
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    Uncomplicating, post: 127975 wrote:
    I tend to agree. While the division has spent big, it is now a profitable venture and beginning to provide a consistent income and profit. That by most measures constitutes a successful venture, especially as the trend is upward. My guess is that in 10 years time, it will look like an inspired choice.
    I agree too. Any new gaming entrant was going to have to spend BIG bucks to catch up with the major players that had years head start, but Xbox seems like an example of where MS got it right coming in late to the market.
    #1108425
    Zava Design
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    Uncomplicating, post: 127961 wrote:
    Precious few companies will build their internal stuff for more than one platform. Cloud apps can exist where they like, but they need a presence on the device of choice. So that’s either a browser or a specifically designed app.
    That’s changing very quickly, it’s not more “tradition” keeping some from developing this way. We’re seeing it in mobile app development, when it first began everyone was developing native apps for iOS, then another one with a completely new code base for Android …etc. But now more and more apps are cloud based, with a “wrapper” delivering them to the relevant phone OS. I only see this increasing over the next decade, which ironically makes it even easier for anyone – personal or corporate – to switch OS’s since they will no longer have to rely on a closed system.

    Look at Adobe, they’ve just started offering online subscriptions for their products, that will become more and more the most common model I believe. Online apps/services are the future.

    #1108426
    JohnTranter
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    Michael [The Mac Experts];127951 wrote:
    The best example I’ve personally seen of this is Custom’s Australian Maritime Identification System (AMIS) project, in a highly secured environment where anything-Apple isn’t certified and Windows XP runs king. Apple won the solution (I wrote the proposal). But not just any solution, Apple supplied all the hardware (you can see the Cinema displays here: https://www.aipm.com.au/resource/09-pmaa-act-actp01-3.jpg) – with Windows used as the certified operating system. Why? Because the decision makers loved their iPhones, and loved the Apple “look and feel”. The tech heads (including me) were screaming high and far that Apple wasn’t certified in this type of environment, but the bean counters got around this requirement by simply allowing Apple hardware with a Windows solution built on-top.

    Did I misunderstand or does that mean it’s Mac laptops/desktops running Windows?

    #1108427
    Michael [The Mac Experts]
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    JohnTranter, post: 128009 wrote:
    Did I misunderstand or does that mean it’s Mac laptops/desktops running Windows?

    Correct, it’s Mac desktops and laptops running a certified and classified version of Microsoft Windows.

    And to bring in to context this post …

    bluepenguin, post: 127976 wrote:
    There are a few misconceptions here:

    1. As cool as Apple products are, 80+% of the world’s desktop computers still run Windows of some form.

    The point I was making is, yes. Majority of business computers run Windows. But this is fast changing. The fact you have Government departments, which in the case of Customs have billions vested in certified operating systems, now willing to work between the lines and introduce Apple products is what Microsoft is scared about.

    Customs and other departments can’t just up and go 100% Apple or UNIX solutions, but they are working towards it. So while Microsoft 10 years ago (using your figures) had huge business penetration, the misconception you’re making is just because they’re historically dominated the markets that they will continue to do so, however this is no longer the case and the data is showing that Microsoft is literally shredding business sales by the day.

    When Government starts to mass migrate away from your solutions. It’s a very big worry.

    #1108428
    Michael [The Mac Experts]
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    Uncomplicating, post: 127985 wrote:
    Same for MS. The man in the street might now have a mac and an iPhone but business uses Windows, Office and Windows servers and is firmly attached to it one way or another, and will be for a very long time to come.

    The tech. industry might move quickly, but infrastructure most certainly does not.

    This actually isn’t true and is the point I’ve been trying to. Yes, Windows will still mostly dominate and will by default for a while no matter how badly Microsoft do. But do you realise how many sales they’ve been shredding over the last 4 years to alternative platforms?

    I’ve performed over 100 PC-to-Mac migrations of businesses in Canberra alone away from 100% Microsoft solutions. I’m not talking 4 man businesses, I’m talking big business. Television stations, stock exchange listed companies, accountants, lawyers, sought after marketing firms. Microsoft professional services has a very real problem.

    At the end of the day, it really depends on which angle you are looking from.

    We deal with heterogeneous solutions. We sell Microsoft solutions where Microsoft solutions make sense, Mac solutions where it makes sense, and UNIX/Linux solutions where it makes sense – and typically, a mixture of all 3. This unique angle of ours, compounded by the fact there are so few Apple specialists running around puts me into a lot of meetings and discussions where one might normally be.

    The movement to Windows infrastructure is far, far, out-shadowed by the move away from Windows infrastructure. I won’t name names, as I am under NDA, but I know of one particular organisation that’s shredded over 4 million/PA in Microsoft licensing alone to alternative infrastructure – only holding on to an Exchange cluster. This particular organisation is the watch-dog and authority of some 1,000 businesses and organisations around Australia and are actively developing iPad and Mac solutions as a sizeable chunk of these businesses throughout Australia are demanding infrastructure changes.

    #1108429
    bluepenguin
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    Zava Design, post: 128002 wrote:
    The demos I’ve seen the GUI is completely different. I know you can go back to a more traditional “desktop” type interface, but that’s not default, and programs open in a true fullscreen mode, and you can’t have smaller multiple windows.

    Or have you seen something different than I’ve seen?

    I had the a beta version on my laptop for a few months. The new “Metro” interface just sits on top of what is pretty much, Windows 7 – minus the Start button.

    The appeal for the new interface will be more for Tablets and Phones.

    #1108430
    bluepenguin
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    I’m not sure that anyone can confidently say what the OS landscape will look like over the next 24 months:

    Microsoft is trying to reclaim lost ground, Apple has lost Steve Jobs, and Google can afford to do whatever they want.

    I’m looking forward to seeing what happens.

    #1108431
    Uncomplicating
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    Michael [The Mac Experts];128015 wrote:
    Yes, Windows will still mostly dominate and will by default for a while no matter how badly Microsoft do.

    So you’re agreeing with me. I’m sure that’s pretty much what I said.

    If I was the local MS rep and you told me that a large government department now ran Windows on a Mac I’d wet myself with excitement. Every time I had a prospect or account talk about Mac I’d point them at the site and say, “They have mac hardware, but so what? LOOK WHAT IT’S RUNNING!!!!!”

    A business can only jump operating system if the software that the business uses runs on the new operating system. And for most businesses it’s really hard to justify changing OS for the simple reason that it works, so why change”; a point amply demonstrated by your example.

    A percentage of businesses may well be migrating to Mac for reasons both good and utterly terrible, and I wish them well. But the majority will sit on Win7 using MS office and their other software coded for Windows for the foreseeable future because there’s no reasonable cost justification for moving.

    #1108432
    JohnTranter
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    Michael [The Mac Experts];128013 wrote:
    Correct, it’s Mac desktops and laptops running a certified and classified version of Microsoft Windows.

    Ok, I’m not disagreeing with anything you’ve said, but it just seemed to be an odd example given that Microsoft apparently didn’t lose anything in this deal. Just whoever sold the hardware originally (Dell, Lenovo, Asus or whoever)

    #1108433
    JohnTranter
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    bluepenguin, post: 128024 wrote:
    I had the a beta version on my laptop for a few months. The new “Metro” interface just sits on top of what is pretty much, Windows 7 – minus the Start button.

    Pretty much what I thought as well, for the desktop edition at least.

    I wonder if, at release, there’ll be an option to skip the Metro interface and boot straight into the ‘standard’ interface.

    #1108434
    Zava Design
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    bluepenguin, post: 128025 wrote:
    I’m not sure that anyone can confidently say what the OS landscape will look like over the next 24 months:

    Microsoft is trying to reclaim lost ground, Apple has lost Steve Jobs, and Google can afford to do whatever they want.
    Yep, agree.

    I’m looking forward to seeing what happens.

    Hmm. I don’t know if I ever look forward to anything computer-wise nowadays. ;)

    #1108435
    Zava Design
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    ]Microsoft has been listening and they’re now reacting. Frankly, I’ve been baffled why it’s taken them so long to react! I’ve structured a lot of my business on them reacting years ago and every day they don’t react, is a day I and others get a leg up on a company that was once untouchable!
    Read the Vanity Fair article I linked to earlier in this thread, gives a great insight in this and the big issue MS has with moving faster with initiatives.

    #1108436
    Uncomplicating
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    Zava Design, post: 128194 wrote:
    Read the Vanity Fair article I linked to earlier in this thread, gives a great insight in this and the big issue MS has with moving faster with initiatives.

    As with IBM, Microsoft’s size and broad product base makes them slow. If history is to repeat itself, and it usually does, the likes of Google, Facebook and the current pride of young lions will go the same way given time.

    Ultimately all glory is fleeting.

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