Home – New Forums Marketing mastery Add prices to website?

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  • #982281
    Sonja Meyer
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    Hi all,

    I need some advice with deciding whether or not it’s worth adding prices for graphic design services on my website.

    Of course all projects are different and it’s difficult to have set prices for things, but some things like logo and website design usually start at a certain base price, which can be a good starting point for people to understand how to budget for their needs, additional functionality etc.

    If you were a potential customer, would you prefer to see some prices to make it easier to make a decision on whether or not to hire me? My feeling is that it takes the effort out of contacting me for a quote, which makes things easier and faster. And would you personally prefer to use an online quote request form (versus using the normal contact form) again, to make things easier?

    My concern is that including base prices may ‘cheapen’ my brand. Many graphic designers prefer to keep their sites simple with just a portfolio and a little bit about their firm so that the service is less ‘online’ and more personal, which can seemingly add value to whatever their specialty.

    However, although most of my clients find me initially offline, as a keen traveller I’m also interested in a more online market and engaging with more potential clients outside of my home city of Melbourne.

    Of course I don’t need to do things the way everyone else is, and my gut feeling is this might be the way to go for me. Thoughts?

    Sonja

    #1135986
    The Copy Chick
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    There was recently a heated debate about this in this thread.

    #1135987
    The Barefoot Marketer
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    There are a lot of good opinions on that thread and the best I can see is to test.

    When it comes down to increasing conversions and profits there is no substitute to cold hard facts.

    Also depends a lot on the market you are targeting.

    If your a low cost provider and your prices are your competitive advantage then I’d have them plastered on my homepage.

    If you are high end business, then focus on really communicating the benefits and matching your message to what’s going on in your prospects life.

    Hope this helps,

    James

    #1135988
    Meat Lover
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    Depends on who you’re targeting. You might say something like “starting at $xyz”.

    Otherwise if you don’t want to be competing on price and only want people who want to work with you because they want you regardless of price then it might be better to avoid adding prices. I think you probably need to decide what kind of customers you want, and what you don’t want and then work backwards from there.

    #1135989
    The Barefoot Marketer
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    Starting with the end in mind is always the best way to develop your marketing.

    Well said Meat Lover!

    Meat Lover, post: 154901 wrote:
    Depends on who you’re targeting. You might say something like “starting at $xyz”.

    Otherwise if you don’t want to be competing on price and only want people who want to work with you because they want you regardless of price then it might be better to avoid adding prices. I think you probably need to decide what kind of customers you want, and what you don’t want and then work backwards from there.

    #1135990
    incredibleconcepts
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    I was initially going to say it’s obvious you should display a price, to give the website visitor every avenue of choosing to hire you.

    However, it’s not that obvious, as was pointed out in the other thread.

    I can now see that not putting a price can lead to intrigue, and a phone call or enquiry.

    Using a test is a clever method.

    #1135991
    AdvancedPetSitting
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    Meat Lover, post: 154901 wrote:
    Depends on who you’re targeting. You might say something like “starting at $xyz”.

    Otherwise if you don’t want to be competing on price and only want people who want to work with you because they want you regardless of price then it might be better to avoid adding prices. I think you probably need to decide what kind of customers you want, and what you don’t want and then work backwards from there.

    This is very true. I for example don’t really care what my designer charges me because I know that whatever I ask him to do he will do it and will go above and beyond to make sure that I’m 100% satisfied. Not to mention that he is super quick with all his work.

    So as mentioned above – depends on the type of clients you want.

    #1135992
    al.giffard
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    It of course depends on the product/service, and I accept the alternative arguments, but for what it’s worth, I very rarely purchase from businesses who don’t publish prices. It’s generally not worth my time enquiring if I don’t know if you’ll even be in the ballpark of what I’m prepared to spend.

    Al.

    #1135993
    scottmav
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    I find having a basic no obligation online quoting form to be the best approach. It’s always a good idea to give some approximate costs as well. Providing no information on costs is not recommended as it is one of the highest priorities for small business owners. Again, this depends on your target market. You can also have a separate site which is solely dedicated to providing quotes, like this one for the cost of a website design.

    #1135994
    isprydigital
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    Rather than listing all your prices, you could still include some information about prices, such as mentionign the the factors that will contribute to the price of a project. This could be things like, the nature, scope and size of the brief, whether or not there is a brief, any author’s changes, whether design requires illustration, rendering and so on, whether they are an existing or new client, whether they are a not for profit, etc( if you have special rates for NFPs,etc.)

    This helps inform the client without giving away too many details and means they aren’t so surprised when they get their quote. It also helps minimise scope creep on projects, and can help the client in focusing on delivering to you an accurate brief.

    You could also mention some price elements that are standardised, e.g domain registration and/or hosting, author’s changes etc.

    As others have said, it does depend on your services and of course, your customer,

    Sarah

    #1135995
    Sonja Meyer
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    Hmm, you’ve all made some really good and valid points.

    Bringing together each of these points I can conclude that it’s probably best that I at least provide an idea of the starting cost of some common projects.

    While I’m not catering to high-end clients (but rather small to medium businesses), I really don’t want to take away from the true value of my work which is holistic design thinking, social responsibility and design for sustainability by standardising prices and making this highly visible. I want people to hire me because I can offer them something special, not because of my price. But I really do want to make it as easy for people as possible when it comes to making an enquiry and thus some information on this is probably needed. As Sarah mentioned, this will likely assist clients in understanding the best way to put together an accurate brief, as they will have a better understanding of what a project might involve.

    I’ll try it out and see how I go! Thanks everyone.

    Sonja

    #1135996
    incredibleconcepts
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    A wise decision to go with the balanced approach Sonja.

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