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  • #990439
    libos04
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    Hi,

    This is my first post on this forum, but I have used it as a reference for a long time.
    I am in the process of starting a mobile physio business and am playing around with designing my website myself. Just wondered what the general consensus might be on whether I should display prices on my website? I know there has been other threads on this in the past, however I wondered if people could voice their opinions based on what they would prefer if they were seeking a physio/massage service?

    My fees are within the range of my competitors but I feel a resistance to putting them on the site. I think it could be because most practices I have worked in have left them off so as to generate more email/phone enquiry and to avoid people making a purely fee-based decision.

    What are people’s thoughts?

    I look forward to learning a lot from you all!

    Libby

    #1176889
    sylv
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    Hi Libby,

    I have heard arguments for both approaches and frankly I don’t think there is a ‘right or wrong’ answer. Is it better to have lots of people call only to have most of them hang up when you name your price or is it better to filter potential clients down to the ones who are already OK with the price and interested in your services?

    It may depend on the industry and how wide the variation is in prices. I have decided to publish my rates, at least for now, but I admit that’s more a personal preference than a business decision. If I go to a website to look for a product or service I like to see prices there.
    Also, I like to project a certain value with the display of my rates, but without being beyond what most people would be willing to pay. I know there are people in my industry who charge up to $500/hour and who are not even qualified, whereas I charge $120 and I do have a proper qualification. My rates, as far as I know, are slightly above average which is exactly where I want them to be. I think if you are happy with your rates, why not display them. You’ve got nothing to hide.

    Just my thoughts. I’m interested to hear what other people think about it.

    Sylvie

    #1176890
    Lisa Crocker
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    Hi Libby,

    Glad to hear you have found the Flying Solo website useful and thanks for posting!

    I was looking for a physio recently and I preferred it when the prices were displayed on the website (although as you mentioned I found most of them didn’t display the prices).

    Kate Toon wrote an article on this topic that you might find useful too: http://www.flyingsolo.com.au/finance/pricing-strategy/displaying-prices-on-your-website-a-good-idea

    All the best,

    Lisa

    #1176891
    MyGreatIdea
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    We’ve used several different physios over the years (three boys, what can I say? lol) and I’ve never checked their prices first. I’ve located them through google search by location.

    For me it’s always been about a convenient location, either close to home or on the way home.

    Wendy :)

    #1176892
    quickbas
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    I agree that for many services, including physio, price is rarely going to be the make-or-break factor for choosing the service. In my health practice, I find that allied health services are chosen more by word-of-mouth reputation by friends or other health practitioners, area of speciality/interest, location and that ephemeral quality known as bedside manner.

    People who go to physios will often need a course of treatment over a period of time, so most clients will be repeat customers.

    For medical services, prices often “cheapen” the product.

    I recommend not showing prices online and focussing more on the factors mentioned. Show parking options, convenience, testimonials, qualifications, and what areas you specialise in (kids? sporting injuries? rehab?).

    #1176893
    libos04
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    Thanks for your advice everyone. You’ve articulated my thoughts perfectly quickbas. I’m offering a fairly unique service I feel and word of mouth referrals will make up most of my client base. I will stick with keeping prices off the site, stress the benefits my service offers and see how I go! Thanks all!

    #1176894
    MissSassy
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    I am a big advocate of people ALWAYS having pricing on their site, regardless of the business type.

    You can have a from price or hourly rate or anything but at least by giving a figure this is one question that interested people do not have to ask. The calls you receive will only be from people who already know they can afford you.

    Almost everyone will go to a website before they do business with a business so the further you send them through the sales process on your site, the less work you need to do once you speak to them.

    Your pricing should never be a secret and it just helps to make your website do a little more of the work for you.

    #1176895
    IncredibleCo
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    Let’s say you don’t, but a competitor does. As a potential customer I’m always going to chose the business that does show their prices over the ones that don’t.

    #1176896
    TashJ
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    I like to see prices on websites. If I don’t I tend to assume it’s going to be expensive. I can’t say I’ve actually looked for a physio online before but I have massage services and I will always look for a few options around me. Particularly if it’s going to be an ongoing expense, price would be a factor for many people. I would never ring a business to find out pricing either, I’d just move onto another website.

    #1176897
    quickbas
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    If you are shopping for a new TV or fridge, then yes, prices are probably the most important tool you are going to use to compare stores to buy from.

    If you are going to a physio, or any other medical professional, price is a much less important factor.

    There are so many far more important factors when choosing a highly trained health professional. Most customers main concern will be “Is this person going to help me get better?”. Unlike buying a TV or fridge, most people will be willing to pay a premium (or at least not be so concerned about price) if the service provided solves their health issue.

    Having said that, informed financial consent is vital for any service provided, especially health services. A simple fee structure should be displayed in your consulting rooms, or discussed when an appointment is made if the customer requests.

    #1176898
    angeline_z
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    IncredibleCo, post: 206051 wrote:
    Let’s say you don’t, but a competitor does. As a potential customer I’m always going to chose the business that does show their prices over the ones that don’t.

    IncredibleCo, I totally agree that it’s worthwhile checking what your competitors are doing. If you’re the only one not displaying prices when most of your competitors are, then you’ve already shot yourself in the foot.

    It’s also important to keep in mind that your website is for people who don’t know you to find out about your business and your services. Those who said they don’t care about prices and are looking for the most convenient physio, location-wise, are not your website audience. They will most like find you using Hotfrog or TrueLocal or Google. They may then look at your website to check your services match their needs but they’ve probably already made a decision.

    Adding prices are for those who want to “shop around” to get the best. They will compare you with your competitors. So give them something to compare. If they have prices, you add your prices. if they have fancy images, you add fancy images.

    #1176899
    quickbas
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    I just did a quick visit to the top 2 pages of physios (about 16 businesses) on Google in my area.

    Interesting result: None of the physio websites displayed prices. Some had general price information (such as discounts for pensioners and Veterans), but no dollar values. They had heaps of information about what services they provide and specialise in, their staff, location, pictures of their rooms etc, but not money.

    Then I clicked on the Adwords ads for 3 physios (sorry guys!). All three of the paid advertised physios displayed prices.

    My interpretation (note this applies to physios/health care only): if you need to use paid advertising to get clients, you seem a bit more desperate and money-focussed. I personally would avoid.

    Again: shopping for health is not the same as shopping for a fridge. There are far greater factors involved in choosing a health professional than price alone.

    #1176900
    angesaav
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    Hi,

    I think it depends on how would you like to differentiate your business and be perceived by your target audience.

    Personally, I prefer to have the prices listed for every type of services offered. Additionally you can work out a quote calculator using a Microsoft/Google spreadsheet and embedded it in your website… with an additional comment saying that prices are referential and subject to change.

    At least it gives your audience an estimation of your prices for your services.

    All the best :)

    Angelo

    #1176901
    bluepenguin
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    The great thing about a website is that you can change it.
    If I was you, I’d try each option (with and without prices) for a month or two and see if it makes a difference.

    I don’t agree that you need to display your prices on your website. If your marketing is largely focused on price, you’ll attract clients that only care about price – and they are the worst type of clients.

    #1176902
    bb1
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    angesaav, post: 206190 wrote:
    Hi,

    Personally, I prefer to have the prices listed for every type of services offered. Additionally you can work out a quote calculator using a Microsoft/Google spreadsheet and embedded it in your website… with an additional comment saying that prices are referential and subject to change.

    Angelo

    I have seen guys in my business try putting up prices and even a quote calculator, the trouble is that clients take the easist options (ie my grass is 2 inchs tall, whereas when you turn up is is 2 foot tall). So they run the quote calculator, but when you turn up you say its X plus 20, and they say but your calculator said X. Be Very very very careful offering quote calculators online, yes you can list a subject to change, but potential clients just see the number they were first given.

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