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  • #967307
    Chris Bates
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    I promised this sort of article ages ago – like months – last year some time! Well I’ve finally started my own blog, and delivered on my promise.

    Beginners: Factors Of A Successful Google AdWords Campaign

    I’m no writer – so hopefully there’s not too many spelling or grammar errors in there ;) haha

    Hope some of you find it useful.

    Cheers,
    Chris

    #1025335
    Anonymous
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    Hi Chris,

    Nice blog post. Very informative.

    I did notice that you mentioned that you should start with a low budget.

    Here’s the opposite perspective from Dan Smith from adwords-marketing-tool.com

    I’m sure he won’t mind me copying and pasting his email tip directly into the forum as anyone can get them for free by signing up at his site.

    You want to start off your Adwords campaign with a high cost per click. For anyone on a marketing budget, that certainly sounds counter intuitive. But the simple truth is you are looking to save money in the long run.

    Setting an initial high cost per click is one of the best kept secrets of the Adwords industry. The number of consumers who click your ad largely determines your quality score for any keyword. Google allows the marketplace to determine the best ads in a Darwinian survival of fittest game. The more clicks your ad gets per impression, the more Google increase the quality score.

    Lets assume you’ve already optimized your Adwords ads and landing pages according to the Adwords Strategy Guide. When you do so, your ad starts with a high quality score. This is important so that you will get better ad positions and more traffic for a much lower cost.

    But if you bid a low cost per click your ad is going to show at lower ad positions. That means your get impressions, but since you are not in the top 3 ad positions you are going to get fewer clicks. Impressions without clicks lowers the CTR. Lower CTR causes Google to think the ad is not relevant and lower the quality score. You need a CTR of at least a half percent.

    Instead, you start with a high initial cost per click. You bid for the top three ad positions, or perhaps the top ad position. Keep in mind you’ll still get the top spot cheaper with the Adwords Strategy Guide than without out. Now your getting many clicks per impression and your CTR is on the rise. Your quality score goes up.

    About two weeks after the launch of your campaign you can begin to slowly lower the click per click. Your high CTR will allow you maintain your top three position while the cost per click is dropping. As long as the CTR remains high, you can keep dropping the cost per click and still maintain your ad position.

    You will have a few weeks of a high cost per click. However, in the long run you will be able to have cheaper costs per click because of the CTR you captured in those first few weeks.

    Let me know what you think.

    regards

    Yener

    #1025336
    sixx
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    Timmy me ol’ mate.

    Fancy seeing you here.

    Great blog entry btw.

    ;)

    #1025337
    Aidan
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    Good article Chris, even if you are stealing my thunder as I have a somewhat similar one coming up here on FS soon!

    I agree with Intuitive in starting bids a little on the high side in many cases to get a bit of clickthrough rate happening, though as you point out in your article your QS scores can change anyway.

    There really is no big secret on how to get top spot for any keyword, its simply having the highest ranking score (which is just the Keyword QS multiplied by the keyword bid).

    Have a QS high enough and you can actually pay less per click than the guys beneath you.

    Nice one :)

    #1025338
    Steve_Minshall
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    Hi Chris,

    Nice article and the grammar was ok, read fine to me.

    Adwords is front and centre for me at the moment because I have just taken my campaign back from a third party that has run it for 18mths. What has really hit me was how much it has changed in just a year and a half.

    As a starting point to resurrecting my campaign I revisited the old campaigns that worked really well just 18 months ago and they were rubbish. I had 3 ad-groups, with 100 or so broadly matched keywords. They generated loads of traffic which generated strong sales at a great return on investment. Sure there was lots of duff traffic but the ROI was so good compared to other advertising methods I didn’t care.

    Fast forward 18 months and in my sector the competition has increased from hardly any of my competitors do it to pretty much all of them. I set up my last campaign in an afternoon. My new campaign has taken much longer setting it up with hundreds of keywords split up into numerous adgroups. I have done all the stuff you recommend because it is really obvious to me that now adwords is still effective but it’s not cheap any more and you really have to make every click count.

    What I have also found just doing search after search and looking at ads for inspiration is that so many people now know the tricks of writing ‘good’ ad copy that it is the norm and it is really hard to get something to stand out. I think position really is everything.

    #1025339
    Chris Bates
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    Thanks for the comments guys!

    @Yenner: Your Campaign budget and your click bid are different. Your Campaign budget is going to keep your overall spend in check, and once your daily budget has been exceeded AdWords will stop showing your ads (thus not messing with your Impression/CTR)

    However the quote is accurate, by having a higher click bid you can actually get it cheaper then setting a lower click bid. The reason for it, is being generous will often give you a better Quality Score. Plus ranking higher, and having the higher placed ads, you’re CTR is better and thus your QS is higher.


    @Aidan
    : Sorry! Haha, I’m sure your’s will have some extra good points though.


    @Steve
    : Position is everything, and there’s actually another little “human behavior” secret there. You can sometimes ‘bid for position’ and aim for the 5th/6th position (2nd and 3rd from the top on the right) or the 9th/10th position (last ones on the right). Why?

    Because the 2nd and 3rd positions on the right are just right of the first organic result entry, and peoples eye tends to flow into it. Also when people hit the bottom of the organic results, their eye will tend to look at the last ads before they click to the next page. This is often cheaper then going for one of the top 3 results.

    But yes – make every click count and you will have a tidy little ROI.

    #1025340
    Gordon Akman
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    Good article Chris.

    First of all I totally agree that bidding strongly particularly early in your campaign is important. Many of your top established competitors may rank significantly higher than you in organic search. So it is important to use adwords aggressively to get market share. When I say aggressively I mean a planned, calculated and targeted campaign – not throw money at your campaign and hope for the best.

    What I have found is that you must continually improve and adapt on adwords. There is always room for improvement and knowing what ads are currently displaying can provide you with excellent information. I review my competitors ads, landing pages, sales systems, information gathering systems and website content constantly.

    Finally, the most important thing to focus on is obviously profitability. Let’s not even use the term ROI. Every business person should be fixated with profit. My ads with the highest CTR are not necessarily my most profitable. My keywords with the highest QS are not necessarily my most profitable.

    #1025341
    Hugh Thyer
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    I tried a campaign a couple of weeks ago. I got some reasonable results. So your article’s come at the right time because I can check some of the other things you mentioned to do it better.

    Thanks for posting.

    Hugh

    #1025342
    Chris Bates
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    That’s it – test, test, TEST! Always be looking at your ads and seeing what can be improved.

    The inspiration behind the post was more helping beginners avoid wasting hundreds of dollars with no results. There’s too much to a successful AdWords Campaign to be included in one post, haha.

    #1025343
    Aidan
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    Gordon/Chris,

    It is so true, I look after Adwords accounts large and small, day in, day out and it still amazes me how sometimes a ‘throw-away’ keyword will turn out to be a star performer given a little patience, even if it has less than a 7 QS!

    I’ve also seen plenty ads perform better in ROI terms when on the 2nd page even if volumes are low…

    Sometimes its better to be 12th than 1st..!

    #1025344
    Daniel82
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    What are your thoughts on clicking “Google Content” on when you set up an ad? I get about 80% of my clicks from Google content ads (for those who don’t know, they are ads shown on other people’s often unrelated websites, to people who weren’t looking for your product before they clicked on it) – but I have a feeling the quality of leads is terrible. It seems to be the people who directly search for “logo design” that end up ordering from me. Is google content a good way to lose money fast?

    Basically this week I spent $50 and $42 of it was Google content clicks – and I asked everyone if they searched on Google or not and most of them replied “yes”. So 50% of my clicks from searches turn into orders (+$$$), and currently 0% from Google content which is where 84% of my money goes.

    Sorry if none of this makes sense. It makes sense in my head.

    #1025345
    Chris Bates
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    Hi Daniel,

    Guessing you scanned through the blog post? Here’s an excerpt.

    Networks
    This is a big money chewer, and is probably the most common way people burn through their advertising budget. It’s a simple setting in your Campaign that most people overlook. Make sure that your ads are only shown in Search Results – ensure that the Content Network is turned off! The problem with the content network is that you need your keywords to be set up properly for it to work effectively. Without experience, it’s unlikely that you will set up your keywords properly – so play it safe and limit your advertising to the Search Results network for now.

    If you haven’t already – turn it off. Content Network is a money sink, unless you’re really micro-managing it and your keywords.

    #1025346
    Daniel82
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    Haha – sorry about that, yes I very briefly skimmed this thread :)

    That’s a perfect answer, I suspected it was a waste of money.

    Cheers
    Daniel

    #1025347
    Anonymous
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    Yep I always turn of content network for my campaigns as well

    Yener

    #1025348
    Aidan
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    The Content Network does have its uses,it is possible to get traffic quite cheaply but it is generally harder to convert to sales.

    The folks I know making good use of it are generally using it to gather email addresses with affiliate style ‘signup for free course/report’ landing pages, then selling to the email list afterwards with repeated offers.

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