Home Forums New here? Share your story Amoeba Access Consulting – accessibility consultants for the built environment

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  • #1000310
    amao
    Member
    • Total posts: 14

    Hello everyone at flying solo:

    I have only just stumbled upon the instruction post for the new members of the forum after being a new member for more than a month.

    I would like to take this opportunity to introduce you all to, Amoeba Access Consulting, the building code and DDA (Disability Discrimination Act) consultants for the built environment.

    I understand that for many of you, what we do as a Disability Access Consultant is a fairly narrow and niche field, with little or no association with your everyday life. But recent statistics produced by Australian Bureau of Statistics suggests that nearly 4 million people in Australia alone have endured some type of, or multiple types of disabilities in their lifetime, meaning nearly 20% of our entire population. When you put this in perspective, you may realise that every one of us may have associated with or have a family member who has a disability.

    Amoeba’s philosophy is based on the Universal Design principles, which first emerged and was coined by an American Architect, Ronald Mace who was an advocate for people with disabilities. He was a lifelong sufferer of polio, and was confined to a wheelchair.

    The term Universal Design is a design development process of creating a built environment or product that is universally accessible to people of all abilities, including people with disabilities.

    Universal design in the built environment often has an emphasis on accommodating people with permanent or temporary physical limitations. At Amoeba Access, we consider the principles where we stand are an opportunity to improve the life experience and assurance of millions of people.

    Amoeba provides building code and DDA advice to clients such as developers, project managers, architects, designers, town planners and government bodies to achieve Development Approval, Building Approval and final construction. Given the narrow audiences we are associated with, I would like to take this opportunity to hear any constructive advice from all of our fellow soloists, when viewed from another perspective, in turn to improve Amoeba’s ability to service a broader community.

    Warm regards,
    Amoeba

    #1223825
    Dave – FS Concierge
    Moderator
    • Total posts: 2,523

    Welcome aboard the forums Amoeba, if we haven’t welcomed you already.

    As someone without much knowledge of your niche, here are a few blanks I’d need filling in to “get” what you do…

    • What are some physical outcomes that I can visualise (differences between a project with or without your services).
    • What are some of the benefits to a building project, beyond fulfilling a legal requirement? Draw them from your past projects, testimonials, etc, to make it real rather than theoretical benefits.
    • How did you come to be in this business? How does your past/experience/quals make you someone worth consulting in this area?

    Even though it’s a niche area, I think if you start to speak terms of these points above, you can explain your service (and its value) to anyone. Your website is a good place to start.

    Great to have you here.
    Dave

    #1223826
    amao
    Member
    • Total posts: 14

    Hi Dave,

    Thanks for your insightful perspective, below are my thoughts to share.

    1. Universal Design in the built environment often has an emphasis on accommodating people with permanent or temporary physical limitations. For example, a kerb ramp on a pedestrian accessway is designed to make the raised sidewalks and streets accessible to people using wheelchairs, parents with baby prams and delivery staff with rolling carts. Similarly, an automatic sliding door within a public space, such as a shopping centre is more accessible to everyone, including small children, workers whose arms are full, and people using walking frames, crutches or wheelchairs. The automatic sliding door often compensates the need for extended latch side clearance requirements required under the Code, should spatial limitation prevail.

    2. My background is in architecture and building surveying. During my time working in architectural practices, we were specialising in large commercial developments, and buildings of a public nature. As part of the design team, I frequently collaborated with disability access consultants, where I started to develop my interests in Universal Design.

    3. What do you think if I start a blog to talk about the outcomes of access consultants’ engagement during the building development process? i.e. explain the real benefits of a building designed beyond the minimum code provisions and legal responsibilities.

    Warm regards,
    Amoeba

    #1223827
    Dave – FS Concierge
    Moderator
    • Total posts: 2,523

    Hi Amoeba,

    That’s a good start. Your blog contains a lot of theory, so just keep in mind that people will want certain things from working with you.

    • A design
    • A ramp, an entrance, a carpark
    • An access problem solved
    • A report
    • An approval signed off
    • A discussion with an expert
    • Win a contract/tender
    • Avoid a lawsuit

    Your website has the potential to be more of an “online store” that sells the above items and outcomes.

    You could blog about a design you just delivered, a building just completed, a problem solved, take us through a report you just delivered and all the things it covered, approvals granted with your help, contracts won, high profile cases in the news that should have been avoided.

    Show them what they can GET from you.
    Good luck!
    Dave

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