Home – New Forums Tech talk Another website without Analytics?

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  • #979791
    Stuart B
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    I am continually amazed at the number of new clients I get who’s websites don’t have Google Analytics, or any stats reporting of any kind for that matter.

    When I do work for people, it’s automatically included, because it’s free for a start, and it takes about 2 minutes to setup and install.

    I honestly don’t understand how there are still web designers out there who think it’s not important enough to just automatically include it in there as a default. Is there something I’m missing?

    Surely there’s no justifiable reason to omit this very powerful and free tool for a new website?

    #1117125
    Divert To Mobile
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    There could be a lot of home grown developers out there.

    Steve

    #1117126
    Aidan
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    I’m not sure why it should be considered an automatic inclusion any more than say guidance on copy writing for business.

    There are lots of designers at lots of different price points and lots of tools out there, some designers tell the clients how to run their businesses and what tools to use to do so, some don’t.

    Not everyone who owns a website knows how to use Analytics or can be bothered learning, many tradies for example just want a presence to show their work and contact details. Their measure of success is often whether the site is on the first page of Google for their favourite search query and the phone is ringing.

    Just my humble opinion.

    #1117127
    Nikita
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    LemonChip, post: 131611 wrote:
    Surely there’s no justifiable reason to omit this very powerful and free tool for a new website?

    There are several reasons:

    What if the client doesn’t require GA? What if they are planning to use other more sophisticated tracking tools?

    On the other hand – Why not to include SEO, register for Google places, create Social Media accounts, integrate sharing buttons, create SEM campaign with every new website?

    The answer is simple:
    a. No need
    b. Client is not prepared to pay – 2 minutes that will require you to do that task also come from years of your experience. Always remember that – it takes 15 minutes and 10 years experience.

    #1117128
    bluepenguin
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    I agree with the comments above. Many of our clients will never touch GA, and about 2 minutes per working day = about 8 hours per year.

    I’d rather set it up for people who want it, and take a day off.

    #1117129
    Aidan
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    bluepenguin, post: 131690 wrote:
    I agree with the comments above. Many of our clients will never touch GA, and about 2 minutes per working day = about 8 hours per year.

    I’d rather set it up for people who want it, and take a day off.

    LMAO – and if you did it twice a day and it took you say 4 minutes each time that would add up to more days off… brilliant!

    #1117130
    Geronimo
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    As someone who does have GA installed, but really doesn’t use it to it’s potential, because I just haven’t taken the time to learn, I think there’s a real market for those of you doing web design/development.

    Create a one day course, at say $250/person, up to 20 people. Rent a venue with morning/afternoon tea provided. Spend the day taking them through GA. Part of the day can be helping clients set up goals etc.

    You could also offer an additional service, at $xx per month, where you will look at their GA stats and provide a scorecard for them (one page summary).

    I imagine these two activities will not only earn some extra money, but certainly open up a whole new level of customer engagement and loyalty.

    If someone local were to offer training like this, I’d be all over it, like a sneezing baby.

    #1117131
    The Flim Flam Shop
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    I am not a big fan of Google Analytics. Some of my websites have cpanel access so I use AWSTATS and that has provided me with the best feedback on what is happening on my sites.

    With my Flim Flam Shop I found that the states that Volusion provide is very comprehensive for visitor analysis.

    If you are serious about using the internet for business you really do need something better than Google analytics. They only touch the surface of what you really need to know.

    #1117132
    Divert To Mobile
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    The Flim Flam Shop, post: 132021 wrote:
    I am not a big fan of Google Analytics. Some of my websites have cpanel access so I use AWSTATS and that has provided me with the best feedback on what is happening on my sites.

    With my Flim Flam Shop I found that the states that Volusion provide is very comprehensive for visitor analysis.

    If you are serious about using the internet for business you really do need something better than Google analytics. They only touch the surface of what you really need to know.

    I used to use awstats – thought it was enough till I tried GA.
    GA is complex enough for my likeing, possibly a little overdone.

    Steve

    #1117133
    Greg_M
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    I always register a site with webmaster tools but not necessarily GA for many of the reasons stated above.

    WT at least ensures the site is verified and targeted geographically for search and I get some feedback on site performance from a SE perspective.

    I used to use GA a lot but it’s become a lot more than I need, also I’ve noticed some regular inaccuracies in the stats, perhaps I’m missing something obvious but the platform I use for a few sites has what’s basically the server stats dished up in a pretty interface, when I look at the same time frame on GA there can be a big discrepancy in unique visitors and geo location.

    I know the servers right because it’s logging ip addresses and I know who’s behind a few of them including my own various computing devices, it’s easy to pick it up on a new low traffic site, what’s the experience of others who’ve compared the stats?

    People are sometimes pretty dumb too, you can tell them they need all this stuff and their eyes just glaze over, they don’t want the hassle of the learning curve… for a couple of close associates I do it all for them but they pay for it … and a few sites is not a big deal but if you’re building sites in volume I think I’d be tempted to just yell “next” if they don’t want to listen, or more to the point, pay.

    I like the conversion to days off formula, might make that part of the internal business analysis.

    #1117134
    Divert To Mobile
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    You may be right. I started a thread a few days back asking if bots and crawlers were included in GA stats but the general consensus was no. I cant put my finger on it, just a gut feeling.

    Steve

    #1117135
    Zava Design
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    The Flim Flam Shop, post: 132021 wrote:
    If you are serious about using the internet for business you really do need something better than Google analytics. They only touch the surface of what you really need to know.
    Whoa, I don’t agree with this at all!

    AWSTATS are fine for some raw stats, but you can do far much more with GA that AW. If all you’re doing is sticking the GA code on your site and looking at their basic reports, fine, you’ll get much the same info as AWSTATS, and maybe AW will offer a few more raw stats that you personally find beneficial.

    But dig even just a little below the surface of GA, and there are a lot more extremely powerful features that AW don’t come close to offering. Visitor flow, visitor conversions, social media analysis, and more. Some info here, but really does take some time paying with GA features to really see how they shine.

    And then with GA premium, you get Attribution Modelling, which would help many businesses.

    #1117136
    Pawpost
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    I am starting up a web based business, my first, and there are about 100 things that are “simple” to designers and seo specialist, marketing professionals and so on… To me, and maybe other first time e-business owners, it makes your head spin… So I can see why something like GA can be passed on.

    I have set it up on my site, and the initial set up does take a few minutes, but then I have to learn a brand new system, on top of all the other aspects of starting a business. I think it can be daunting to some. I mean there are a lot of new things you must learn: webmaster tools, GA, and the equivalent over at BING…quite a bit for us newbies.

    Also, in the beginning, analytics seems useless, because you don’t have the traffic yet, there is nothing to report… If you don’t build traffic fast enough, I can see how some people will just let it slip out of their routine.

    All that said, I still think it is worth while to have an analytic software if you are going online. And useful for a professional to at least mention to their clients.

    #1117137
    Stuart B
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    Zava Design, post: 132119 wrote:
    Whoa, I don’t agree with this at all!

    AWSTATS are fine for some raw stats, but you can do far much more with GA that AW. If all you’re doing is sticking the GA code on your site and looking at their basic reports, fine, you’ll get much the same info as AWSTATS, and maybe AW will offer a few more raw stats that you personally find beneficial.

    Apparently mor ethan 50% of the fortune 500 companies worldwide use GA, so I’d say that’s pretty much case closed for me.

    Pawpost, post: 133598 wrote:
    I am starting up a web based business, my first, and there are about 100 things that are “simple” to designers and seo specialist, marketing professionals and so on… To me, and maybe other first time e-business owners, it makes your head spin… So I can see why something like GA can be passed on.

    For business owners trying to learn everything themselves yes I can understand that, but the point I was making was that there is no excuse for web designers not including some kind of stats tracking in the products they make. For no cost, and about minutes of setup time the designer can include this tool for their customers, regardless if it gets used or not.

    I get new clients all the time who say “I want to get more traffic” or “I want to make more sales” and my first question is “do you have some statistic reporting I can look at?”.

    When they say no, it is apparent to me that their last designer either, didn’t have a clue what they were doing, or didn’t care about their client, or both.
    So when the client says they have nothing it means that we have to start from scratch, waiting and analyzing performance because there’s literally no information to go on.

    #1117138
    Pawpost
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    I think, unfortunately, the “I want to get more traffic…What is analytics?” is not going away… I am sure anyone who has worked in a customer service roll can tell you that general questions with obvious answers will never stop… I think they just get worse as you become more skilled at your job too….

    Anyway, I understand what you’re saying and can agree that web designers should at bare minimum discuss what analytical software can do before starting to work on a project.

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