Home – New Forums Marketing mastery Anyone tried direct marketing? Letterbox drops?

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  • #1194138
    FionaAmarasinghe
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    AgentMail, post: 229132, member: 17801 wrote:
    The lead magnet should be something free to the resident, and preferably low cost to you. I would recommend something like ‘the Ultimate Party Planning Guide’ as an ebook (or printed if budget allows). Once you have solid data on when the kids birthdays are, your response rates on TARGETED marketing will be far greater.
    .

    No don’t call it that, because that’s almost exactly what my lead magnet is called lol. Here it is, the Ultimate Kid’s Party Planner. http://www.easybreezyparties.com.au/party-inspiration-and-ideas/item/29-the-ultimate-kids-party-planner.html

    (Though I must say it’s a very effective lead magnet for me…so I think your suggestion is excellent)

    #1194139
    Paul Leach
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    Helen27, post: 230465, member: 28729 wrote:
    Thanks for the pointers, I’d love to get more reviews.
    My blog if on the top navbar under party ideas.
    Hope my SEO guys nkow what they’re doing!
    Im not on shopify.
    And I know I can’t get first position, I just wanted to rank high enough to get, say, 6 sales a day. Thats all I’d need to be fine, even less for bigger sales. I don’t need (and couldn’t handle) the ‘one order every 9 seconds’ that The Party People get……… It really sounds discouraging right now from what I am hearing, I don’t seem to have any actual chance of really ranking at all.
    Hi Helen,
    Some of my ecommerce clients get good results from shopping comparison sites like MyShopping.com.au, the cost per click is typically much lower than Adwords or Google Shopping. The visitors from these sites are really in the buying mood and conversion rates are much higher than standard visitors that land on your home page as these visitors go straight to the product page.
    Don’t let previous comments discourage you, just bear in mind that like any business it will take time to get off the ground, stick with it and good luck!
    #1194140
    Rohan@TD
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    Hi Helen,

    Some excellent advice and points coming your way here and on your Google Adwords question. I’m not a marketing expert, but here are a couple of quick points from me:

    • Are you emailing your paying customers with follow up deals, for themselves and friends they refer? A $50 reward voucher for a previous customer referring a friend who purchases more than $200 (for example), is a pretty big incentive for parents with multiple kids to recommend you to their friends. Much cheaper (through email) and more effective than other physical direct marketing approaches.
    • Are you recording the dates of the reoccurring events (birthdays, anniversaries etc.) you are supplying goods for and re-engaging with them just prior to the same event (the next year) with offers / specials / deals? This takes years to set up, but if you’re doing a great job people will want to reconnect with you. Especially time poor, high value customers. Again, cheaper and more personal than other direct marketing approaches
    • Have you tried directly marketing to venues to become their ‘preferred supplier’? Targeting venues, instead of individual customers, may open up new customer channels for you. Set the venue up as an event to do some mutually beneficial promo photos you can both share. There are a number of ways you can achieve this.
    • Your website doesn’t show ‘also bought with’ recommendations. I just added an item to my cart as a test and it doesn’t follow it up with direct suggestions of what else I should buy. I note it does show ‘related items’ – but only if you click on the tab and not on the same page! At this stage you already have people on your website looking to buy items, up-sell and cross-sell to enhance their experience and your total sales revenue. Your web designers should be able to help you with this.

    The final three points are somewhat connected, but you can approach them separately if you wish:

    • You’re a visually engaging business – You need Instagram.
    • Your Facebook doesn’t appear to have photos of events you have supplied goods for. If they are, name and tag the venue they are in. If it’s somebody’s house, refer to them by their first name – tag them if your customers are happy for it. Reach out to your previous customers and ask for some photos. Tag venues and people to connect with their social media audiences – again this also works with Instagram. Offer their audiences deals.
    • Try directly targeting locations. Demonstrate to your customers what they can achieve, in their preferred event locations, when they shop on your website. For example – Kids parties occur in the same park play-sets every week. Take the time to set a few of these popular locations up with your products to take some marketing shots. These photos can then be shared on community pages, your website, social media, local newspapers, with play groups and go into other marketing material. Consider targeting your key target market locations first. Keyword the park locations and (event type) together to get your webpage high on their results and into Googles image search.

    If you find any of the above useful, don’t forget to quickly update your marketing plan and ensure your efforts reflect your priorities and target market.

    I’m sure you’re doing some of the above, but I thought it would may help you if you weren’t.

    Rohan

    #1194141
    Mark – Yotta Bookkeeping
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    Hi,

    My wife and I have experience with letterbox drops. When she was first starting out her domestic cleaning business, we’d walk the streets distributing flyers. We were surprised at how many hits we actually got. From 100 flyers we got about 3 or 4 new jobs with most continuing to today. When you consider you can buy 500 flyers for under $100, then the ROI of this method of marketing certainly made economic sense to us. Additionally, I would recommend asking your local cafes and other small businesses if you can leave some flyers there. We also got business from this method. However, our biggest success has come from Gumtree believe it or not. I was also involved with another business and once they advertised free on Gumtree they got heaps more work.

    Good luck!

    #1194142
    heftzwecke
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    My man is a gardener and letterboxing works perfectly for him. The advantage if you do anything around the house like gardener, lawn, handyman you have all your clients close together. That saves you driving around. But we do much lower numbers and print them out on the normal printer -you have to be able to do the jobs!

    #1194143
    bradzo
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    PistolandBoo, post: 228597, member: 76573 wrote:
    poxier looking estate agents).

    Hahaha!

    #1194144
    TimStokes
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    Hi Helen,
    Over the last 30 years I’ve probably put out 250,000 letterbox flyers for 3 different businesses, plus talked to dozens of clients who have, and designed a dozen for clients.

    Yes, they can work, but there are a large number of variables with it.

    I haven’t heard or seen a lot of success recently, however a mechanic I talked to today has had some success and that encouraged me to advise him on designing it better.

    The design can make or break the result. You can put out 10,000 and get nothing or put out 10,000 and make a lot of sales. Your average $ sale has a big impact on profitability.

    50 enquiries is about par for the course as an expectation for a very well designed flyer when you put out 10,000. That’s on the high end. and that’s 0.05%

    I had a client hit 6% for a fruit and veg shop and I was very happy for my own business training company running seminars to get 0.04% after testing more than a dozen designs. Mind you they were in black and white and cost effective.

    Delivery has a huge impact on results. Australia Post has a UMS service that delivers unaddressed mail to a business or private or street box that costs a lot more, but they aren’t going out with 20 or 30 other flyers so they get noticed more.

    The material you get it printed on is important for results too. Its a big subject and a lot of variables need to be considered, so hopefully this helps.

    I recommend you test 2,000 at a time. More you could be wasting money on something that may not work. Testing is how you improve by hundreds of percent!

    Tim
    Profit Transformations

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