Home Forums Marketing mastery Are you one of the 65% of Aust. businesses w/out a website? What’s stopping you?

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 173 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1067246
    JohnSheppard
    Member
    • Total posts: 940
    peteract, post: 99216 wrote:
    It seems that all webdesigners that I speak to are only interested in the B2B clients.”

    They cannot make any money off other clients because it’s almost universal that people are unawares of the time energy and costs that go into converting visitors……web designers are a business too…not a charity…

    Even in this thread there are only a few who seem to realise that websites need an objective and supporting business case…

    #1067247
    RossFreiberg
    Member
    • Total posts: 18

    Hi

    I like the point of “understanding the value you are bringing to the table”.

    I am fairly tech savvy, but if you described to me the “Rolls-Royce” of computers and explained to me why I should have one, my reply would be to tell you where I pick up a refurbished dual core PC for $100 which does what I want it to do just fine.

    With my computer, I want to write a few docs and spreadsheets, browse the web, watch YouTube and lots of other everyday tasks. Therefore, my $100 used computer is fine for me as it delivers what I want. I get the value I am looking for. I don’t need a $2000 new i7 PC to do this for me. (and I am sure a couple of Mac users have just vomited).

    So it is with a business website, if it does what the owner wants, not what the seller thinks the buyer should have, then value has been delivered to the buyer.

    I talk to business owners about the ROI they wish to receive from their website. The website is a tool, not an end in itself. In most cases, then end goal of a business is to make sales. If a website helps in this process, then it is a good tool, fit for the purpose it was designed for.

    I also talk to business owners about the values per lead and per customer
    an website can produce. For example, if the average customer is worth $200 per year to a business and if a website can generate 500 new customers per year, then that website has delivered $100,000 of new custom to that business during that year.

    If the marketing bill, including the website and other activities for that same year was $10,000, then they are $90k in front.

    If you can then show the client exactly how those 500 new customers are going to come through their door, including how the website will help, from my experience, this is the only education most of my potential clients are interested in.

    This is “the value you are bringing to the table”.

    If a well designed website for $5000 does it for one business, that’s a great ROI.

    If a hacked together site on a WordPress template for $400 does it for a local restaurant, that is great also.

    Horses for courses.

    Talk benefits rather than features.

    Regards,

    Ross,

    #1067248
    Shaukat Adam (Khalid)
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,528

    nicely said. value is subjective and it’s up to us to determine what is value in the eyes of the client and then deliver.

    I was just looking at your website and the optin form has “send report now” above it. The headline doesnt mention anything about the report or what the report can do for prospects or why they should fill the form now instead of later.

    Btw, how did you find Koenig’s MSMM 2.0?

    RFreiberg, post: 101187 wrote:
    Hi

    I like the point of “understanding the value you are bringing to the table”.

    I am fairly tech savvy, but if you described to me the “Rolls-Royce” of computers and explained to me why I should have one, my reply would be to tell you where I pick up a refurbished dual core PC for $100 which does what I want it to do just fine.

    With my computer, I want to write a few docs and spreadsheets, browse the web, watch YouTube and lots of other everyday tasks. Therefore, my $100 used computer is fine for me as it delivers what I want. I get the value I am looking for. I don’t need a $2000 new i7 PC to do this for me. (and I am sure a couple of Mac users have just vomited).

    So it is with a business website, if it does what the owner wants, not what the seller thinks the buyer should have, then value has been delivered to the buyer.

    I talk to business owners about the ROI they wish to receive from their website. The website is a tool, not an end in itself. In most cases, then end goal of a business is to make sales. If a website helps in this process, then it is a good tool, fit for the purpose it was designed for.

    I also talk to business owners about the values per lead and per customer
    an website can produce. For example, if the average customer is worth $200 per year to a business and if a website can generate 500 new customers per year, then that website has delivered $100,000 of new custom to that business during that year.

    If the marketing bill, including the website and other activities for that same year was $10,000, then they are $90k in front.

    If you can then show the client exactly how those 500 new customers are going to come through their door, including how the website will help, from my experience, this is the only education most of my potential clients are interested in.

    This is “the value you are bringing to the table”.

    If a well designed website for $5000 does it for one business, that’s a great ROI.

    If a hacked together site on a WordPress template for $400 does it for a local restaurant, that is great also.

    Horses for courses.

    Talk benefits rather than features.

    Regards,

    Ross,

    #1067249
    tradr
    Member
    • Total posts: 45

    Mike Koenigs MSMM is very expensive.

    Your initial outlay only lasts for a year then you have to keep paying exorbitant fees. (in the 1000’s)

    Mike is a veteran in online marketing, and you could look at his knowledge as a worthy investment.

    But if you are only a small business in struggling times, I still think there are other ways to conduct marketing for your business.

    It is to balance a cheap hacked together wordpress site with solid online marketing techniques.

    My two thoughts,

    thanks

    John

    #1067250
    Dopey
    Member
    • Total posts: 7

    Hi Copy Chick,

    I realise this is a very old thread but I’m currently doing some searches in relation to the questions I have prior to asking what may well be the same questions.

    I found your thread in the pile. Funnily enough, I’m broaching the same issue in my business at present: setting up a website. Presently, it’s connected to my domain name but all it has is my logo and contact details with an invitation to contact me for an appointment.

    The reason why I haven’t made it a priority is this:

    (a) it’s overwhelming – the amount of information required for a website is time consuming and tedious;

    (b) web developers (in my experience) charge way too much for what I consider to be a basic service (ie no bells and whistles just foundation stuff) and I just cannot afford them; and

    (c) while I’m not a computer numpty, it takes time to sit down, upload the photos, write the copy and set it up in a way that is easy to navigate…which brings me back to (a) really.

    Looking at the above, I realise that these reasons should not hold me back but reality being what it is, they do.

    I am not averse to hiring designer pros. But I’ve had a godawful time with the one I ended up with which I only ended up getting a logo from because the process was so difficult. They were nice and efficient but when it came to tweaks and what I thought were reasonable requests (eg. could you supply me with two final proofs – one with a white background, the other with a black background), I got “I’ve allocated more time to this than was necessary…”, and “but it looks great the way it is…”. If you pay for a service (and I did pay…$$$!) then you should get what you ask for and I’m just finding time after time (have gone through quite a few querying stages) that designers are just not giving me what I’m asking for so at this rate I might as well learn Photoshop and Illustrator myself :)

    #1067251
    Past-Member
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,815

    re ‘that designers are just not giving me what I’m asking for …’

    Please don’t judge all designers that way. Most professionals will ‘tweak’ until you are happy with it. I certainly do.

    #1067252
    Divert To Mobile
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,752

    Hi Dopey,

    As a beauty therapist you provide a service that some people can do on their own.
    If a client comes to you and says “I want a manicure” you of course will provide a manicure. But if after your finished they begin to ask for changes that they might find quite reasonable considering shaping and painting nails is something they can do on their own, “can you change the colour of the French tips to pink, can you make the ends round instead of square”
    you may just find yourself saying to them…

    Dopey, post: 151733 wrote:
    “but it looks great the way it is…”.

    because everything takes time, and as a sole operator providing services time is money.
    Asking for more or changes from what was originally discussed / or assumed is lost time and money for the service provider.

    before getting any work done (or doing any work for that matter) be sure that the parties absolutely understand the scope of works. Then there should be no grumbling at the end.

    Steve

    #1067253
    Greg_M
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,691

    Might be an old post, but it is a good thread.

    Given your obviously not a “numpty” (I love that, I’m gonna steal it … it describes some of my clients perfectly). I’ll offer a link to Squarespace. I promote this regularly for more than DIY (but you can) but it’s worth a look.

    I started building websites for small business clients (existing in another business) mainly because they all had similar issues to you, and I agree for something straight forward the cost and learning curve can be daunting.

    I can write code, so why Squarespace? It’s everything rolled into one … no separate issues with hosting et al. The available templates use responsive design (site works on anything, including your phone … which I think is essential for a small service business), the added bonus is that you can hack the code in a template, or go bespoke which most DIY stuff limits severely, full functionality is still there if you just want to drag and drop … you just can’t get the subtle stuff you can with front end code access.

    If you like the look of it and get stuck, send a PM and I’ll see if I can help.

    #1067254
    Dopey
    Member
    • Total posts: 7

    No, Steve. I wouldn’t say that and French tips are never pink.
    I think I’ll leave it there. LOL

    Divert To Mobile, post: 151745 wrote:
    Hi Dopey,

    As a beauty therapist you provide a service that some people can do on their own.
    If a client comes to you and says “I want a manicure” you of course will provide a manicure. But if after your finished they begin to ask for changes that they might find quite reasonable considering shaping and painting nails is something they can do on their own, “can you change the colour of the French tips to pink, can you make the ends round instead of square”
    you may just find yourself saying to them…

    because everything takes time, and as a sole operator providing services time is money.
    Asking for more or changes from what was originally discussed / or assumed is lost time and money for the service provider.

    before getting any work done (or doing any work for that matter) be sure that the parties absolutely understand the scope of works. Then there should be no grumbling at the end.

    Steve

    #1067255
    Dopey
    Member
    • Total posts: 7

    Yeah I know Karen. There surely are a lot of good ones out there. I just haven’t been able to attract them without a $1,500 price tag. LOL

    KarenC, post: 151738 wrote:
    re ‘that designers are just not giving me what I’m asking for …’

    Please don’t judge all designers that way. Most professionals will ‘tweak’ until you are happy with it. I certainly do.

    #1067256
    community engine
    Member
    • Total posts: 30

    It is an interesting question!

    I think there’s many of reasons that many businesses still aren’t finding their place online. When we’re referring to a business’ own site, many small business people just don’t have the time or budget to manage a website, not to mention learn how to set one up in the first place! SEO is a huge issue – you can set up a site but if nobody can find it then whats the point?

    It also depends on the actual business owners own use of the internet as a consumer – if they aren’t really someone who is online much, then they aren’t going to place much value on an online presence. Many small businesses, particularly service based businesses, aren’t looking to acquire customers outside of their local area – so they may not see the need to get themselves online – they don’t need to be found by people on the other side of the country or even just the city.

    Obviously Facebook and Twitter are great places to start, but they do require a certain amount of updating and regular interaction to be really effective, and for some businesses owners daily posting and tweeting is just not going to happen. It’s also important to cover a bit more local ground than that. If I am looking for a local Thai restaurant, I’m not going to turn to Facebook for that, nor would I even expect an actual website.

    Perhaps a solution here could be to encourage smaller businesses to simply start with checking existing or creating new directory listings – make sure they are up to date and optimised. It would involve spending a little time writing a small blurb about your business and popping that onto a few directories to start with. The same goes for social media – even if spending alot of time on it isn’t possible, it’s great to at least get your correct contact details, opening hours, basic info and perhaps even a few images out there.

    #1067257
    Divert To Mobile
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,752
    Dopey, post: 151777 wrote:
    No, Steve. I wouldn’t say that and French tips are never pink.
    I think I’ll leave it there. LOL

    Sorry, this is what I meant. Not up with all the terms,

    french-manicure-with-glitter-pink.jpg

    Not my nails btw.

    Steve

    #1067259
    The Copy Chick
    Member
    • Total posts: 963
    Dopey, post: 151733 wrote:
    Hi Copy Chick,

    I realise this is a very old thread but I’m currently doing some searches in relation to the questions I have prior to asking what may well be the same questions.

    The reason why I haven’t made it a priority is this:

    (a) it’s overwhelming – the amount of information required for a website is time consuming and tedious;

    (b) web developers (in my experience) charge way too much for what I consider to be a basic service (ie no bells and whistles just foundation stuff) and I just cannot afford them; and

    (c) while I’m not a computer numpty, it takes time to sit down, upload the photos, write the copy and set it up in a way that is easy to navigate…which brings me back to (a) really.

    Looking at the above, I realise that these reasons should not hold me back but reality being what it is, they do.

    Part of the reason I originally posted this question was because me and the web designer I work closely with, an NBN rep and a lovely guy from the Regional Development Board were putting together an information seminar based on providing people like yourself with the information and resources to overcome these hurdles. This was called “The Shift – Taking Business Online” and we gave all of our attendees USBs with a heap of information and resources to point them in the right direction. We’ve done this presentation 4 times in the last 2 years and hope to keep on rolling it out (in the meantime, we try to post relevant and helpful articles on the Facebook page for newbies).

    This post was a bit of a research question to identify what the potential issues were so we could address those directly in our presentations (rather than just making assumptions and telling people what we thought they needed to hear).

    We also included half a dozen local businesses who weren’t web/media/tech experts to share their stories and experiences to show what was possible, even if you didn’t have a lot of money or resources.

    A simple website needn’t cost the earth, but – like most things – you do generally get what you pay for. WordPress is a very affordable option for many startups and other affordable options exist.

    Once you start personalising, that’s when you’ll start paying more… and even simple looking sites can involve quite a bit of work behind the scenes, depending on your requirements (even adding the content, formatting and testing can be quite time-consuming).

    I guess it then does become a trade-off over time vs money, but I believe that if you get it right, it can be a very good investment for your business. I’ve had clients who’ll pay over $8,000 each year for Yellow Pages advertising, but baulk at a one-off payment of $4,000 for a custom website – with professionally written copy, SEO and analytics in place.

    Of course, finding a designer who fits your needs can be tricky. From what you’ve said, it sounds like misaligned expectations with the design, which is why it’s always so important to find a designer (or copywriter) who is very clear about exactly what IS and what ISN’T included in the price. You should know up-front (and in writing) how many revisions are included, whether writing or even loading content is part of the service, whether ongoing assistance is included or billed (and at what rate), etc. etc.

    Usually the lower the price, the less you get and added extras can build up fast.

    But that’s where a forum like this can be an invaluable tool! There are all sorts of wonderful people from all sorts of industries willing to share the experience and expertise for any questions you have.

    Sorry for the ramble… sometimes I spend too much time thinking out loud!

    Cheers,
    Anna :)

    #1067260
    RobynLee
    Member
    • Total posts: 26
    fredfarcle, post: 83523 wrote:
    If they now nothing else, most small businesses know if your not on the front page of Google organic search you’re wasting your breath, so when their site is not on the front page of Google in a week, they crack it and lose interest.

    While I agree that being on the first page of Google is necessary if you are hoping to generate more business through being online, it is still advantageous to have a Website even if it is not ranking highly. I always go online and Google a business name to see what turns up when I’ve heard of them via word of mouth, seen their van drive by, etc. and I’m interested in their services. If I don’t find them, I usually go elsewhere. I think it’s vital these days to have an online presence even if it’s not targetting sales as much as providing information on services, contact information and a bit of a run-down on the company.

    #1067261
    RobynLee
    Member
    • Total posts: 26

    It would be interesting to know the age/demographics and types of the small businesses that do not have a web presence.

    I am just theorising, but I bet more small business owners up to 30 years plus would have some kind of web presence — a site or Facebook page, etc. because they’ve grown up with hanging out online, shopping online, etc.

    I know a small business owner that has been talking about developing a web site for two years. They are in their mid 40’s, they don’t know much about designing sites etc. themselves and they “don’t have time” for Facebook or other social media sites. Their business is doing well without having a launched site and they simply don’t see the need for it. They think about it every few months, make a call, say it’s too expensive to set up when they don’t really need one anyway and then it slips from their priority list again.

    In their case they’re doing well financially, their company has plenty of business, they’re not that interested in expanding more–just keeping things going at the level they’re at now as they don’t want to have to add more staff, etc. and they’re making plenty of money as it is. They also think setting up and running a site is incredibly complex–they don’t have time to do so and aren’t interested in having someone employed to handle that side of things. — I’ve tried to explain the need for having a web presence but if someone honestly doesn’t feel it is important you can’t do that much about it, lol.

    I know its not age only of course (hubby is well over 50 and he’s always tweaking his site) but it would be interesting to find out more specifically what types of businesses make do without feeling the need for taking it online.

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 173 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.