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  • #987852
    PowerofWords
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    Hi everyone,

    I have installed a new Contact form which asks web visitors a few questions – so far no takers. I want it to be firm yet friendly, as I’ve had some enquiries relating to things I cannot help authors with and it tends to take up time.

    Do you think it puts genuine prospects off?
    http://jenniferlancaster.com.au/contact/

    Also, I don’t know how to boost the font size, as this is set by the wordpress form. Thanks.

    #1164595
    Greg_M
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    I can’t see it putting anyone off, seems well laid out. It’s not intimidating and you have all your contact details above it, so trusting where stuff is going, isn’t an issue either.

    There are a few steps to go through though (are they all required for form to work?), a lot of users will resist filling it in unless they really need to.

    This post caught my eye, because I’m currently having an argument with myself over whether to set up a contact form on my own site (currently just have direct contact details including email).

    I personally hate them (using them), and maintaining them. From sites I’ve had in the past (for clients spread over several different business areas) I’ve observed very mixed results. Some sites got enquiries this way, especially off mobiles … but a lot just lay there and did zip (the sites were successful in other ways and generated enquiries-just not off contact forms).

    Maybe some marketing / funnelling type Guru might have some better ideas how to get it to be used more.

    On your font size, you’ll probably need to get into the CSS file to alter it … chances are, if the form builder is a plugin, it may have it’s own file tucked away. Otherwise it may be “inheriting” from the theme CSS file.

    Fiddling with it may be a bit ugly if you’re not sure what you’re doing, but not a big deal for someone who does.

    Cheers

    #1164596
    bluepenguin
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    I think it’s smart.

    It will sound ridiculous to most, but the best thing I ever did to my website was to make it harder to contact me, and to make the language a lot less warm and welcoming than seems right.

    It saves me hours every week dealing with tyre-kickers.

    #1164597
    Jenny Spring
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    PowerofWords, post: 190399 wrote:
    Hi everyone,

    I have installed a new Contact form which asks web visitors a few questions – so far no takers. I want it to be firm yet friendly, as I’ve had some enquiries relating to things I cannot help authors with and it tends to take up time.

    Do you think it puts genuine prospects off?
    http://jenniferlancaster.com.au/contact/

    Also, I don’t know how to boost the font size, as this is set by the wordpress form. Thanks.

    Hi Jennifer

    I’d take it off your site, and use it as a way of engaging in a conversation.

    Put it in your email auto-responder instead. At about email #4, add a survey. That way you’ve already built rapport, and if the person has stayed on in the email series, they’ll be ready to give you a little more information.

    It depends what your goal is.

    Collection of potential clients via email, or collecting information.

    For me, collect the email address, have a conversation, then ask for more information.

    Jenny

    #1164598
    Steve_Minshall
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    I’m not really a fan of a list of things you can’t do.

    I prefer the more positive ‘specialists-at-doing’ approach which makes it clear exactly what you are good at.

    We make it very clear what we do but still get enquiries for some related products we don’t handle. We simply direct the enquiry to someone else that we know is more likely to help. At the very least this is good karma. You have helped some one else in the industry and helped a person possibly get a solution to their problem. It is all good and while there is no direct pay off I am convinced the more you wrap your business in positive stuff rather than barricades you will win out.

    Are you really that overwhelmed with enquiries that you have not got the time to cut and paste: ” Thank you for your enquiry, our area of expertise is xyz. However, try ‘these-guys’ who may be able to help you better.” ?

    Make friends with someone who does the stuff you get unwanted enquiries for, you just may find that they are getting jobs more suited to you and will refer you in return.

    #1164599
    PowerofWords
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    Steve_Minshall, post: 190697 wrote:
    I’m not really a fan of a list of things you can’t do.
    I prefer the more positive ‘specialists-at-doing’ approach which makes it clear exactly what you are good at.
    .
    Thanks Steve, Jenny, estim and all who responded. I am going to change it and make it less intimidating. The email series – working on it – I have lots of free niche reports in the autoresponder already, so will consider adding a survey.
    #1164600
    John Romaine
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    Shorter, simpler contact forms always convert better.

    Get the basics, name, email, phone. Then follow up with a phone call.

    Only ask for something else if it is absolutely vital.

    Don’t forget mobile users that will hit your contact page and be trying to type with their thumb.

    #1164601
    TehCamel
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    I’d fill it out.

    however – one thing I do note – the only thing you specifically require on the form is a person’s name.

    if they don’t give you their phone unmber, or email address, how do you contact them?

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