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  • #982653
    asmgx
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    • Total posts: 34
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    Hi FlyingSoloers :)

    I want to print out some business cards and make the company stamp.

    I want to know what things should be listen in the business cards ( i am trying to look as professional as possible).

    also the company stamp, what should it include ?

    Thanks

    #1137981
    Sign Here Graphix
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    • Total posts: 32
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    Your business card should include all pertinent contact information. It is a tool to give others the ability to contact you, it is not a piece of marketing material. By the time you are handing over a business card your marketing is over and the sale begins.

    Design preference is always personal, but it should match in with any other branding material or assets you have.

    I had a client only yesterday hand me a business card with red text, but the website has yellow text and they wanted something different again for signage on their car. This can make things confusing as if you get the website off the car your initial thought may be that you got it wrong.

    Keeping things consistent it will help you build your brand in the longer term and make you look more professional in the short term.

    Your business cards need to match the signs on your shop/office/factory, which in turn should match your uniforms and your website and anything else you wish to put your name on.

    #1137982
    WhatsThePlanDan
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    Sign Here Graphix, post: 157461 wrote:
    It is a tool to give others the ability to contact you, it is not a piece of marketing material. By the time you are handing over a business card your marketing is over and the sale begins.

    I have to strongly disagree here. Although it shouldn’t be a flashing billboard a business card can and certainly should be a marketing tool. Quite often you will find yourself in situations where you only have time for a handshake and a business card transfer – you want that card to work for you in that instance (example in a large networking event). What about when someone passes your card to someone else they know – don’t you want your card to give them a reason to want to check you out further? I know for the cards I’ve just put together, the front contains all the usual contact details but on the reverse I have put a simple sentence that will (I hope!!) entice the bearer to visit my website and find out more about what we do.

    One thing I have learnt from this forum – never, ever, ever miss an opportunity to turn a stranger into a prospect!

    Having said all the above though – I completely agree with the rest of your advice.

    Cheers
    Daniel

    #1137983
    Anonymous
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    Sign Here Graphix, post: 157461 wrote:
    Your business card should include all pertinent contact information. It is a tool to give others the ability to contact you, it is not a piece of marketing material. By the time you are handing over a business card your marketing is over and the sale begins.

    Hi asmgx and Sign Here Graphix,

    Just to add a different viewpoint here, my experience has been the exact reverse of this.

    In my marketing consulting and copywriting business I predominantly work with businesses in the natural health industry. Most of my work comes from my industry network or via word of mouth (which, of course is an extension of my network).

    My logo and branding for that business has been carefully designed to reflect my specialisation in that niche market as well as my own personality (you can check it out on my website if you’re interested). Whenever I hand out my business card to someone in that industry, it becomes a talking point immediately. When that person is not someone I’ve already done business with, it becomes the STARTING point for my marketing, immediately communicating my expertise and specialisation.

    Even though my other business is business-to-consumer (rather than B2B like the one above), the business cards have the same effect. They’re vibrant and quirky, and we’ve purposely designed our branding to have completely different energy and personality to others in our niche market. People always comment, and often head to our website to learn more.

    I’m not saying the same would hold true for everyone, but in my opinion, the investment I’ve made in quality design and quality printing and materials for my business cards has been well worth it.

    I’ll be interested in other’s thoughts, but in my experience asmgx, it is worth putting as much effort into the marketing and branding angle or your cards as to getting all the right details on them.

    Good luck designing yours, and I hope you love what you end up with as much as I love mine!

    Jayne

    #1137984
    Brent Foster
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    • Total posts: 15
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    I agree with Jayne in this instance, and emphasize the importance of quality in the design of branding and corporate material.

    Some will argue that a business card’s primary role is to provide contact information, which 10 years ago was entirely correct, however in this day and age a business card has 2 primary goals– to promote ‘Brand Awareness’ and to build ‘Trust’.

    The reason for this is that customers tend to Google a business before they call about a product or service, so if they can remember your brand name, then they will have access to all the contact information they need. The focus on brand awareness also assists in securing customers, as they tend to prefer to brands that they know and trust. This is where quality in design is important– customers interpret the level of quality in branding as an indication of the quality they are likely to receive in a product and/or service. If you present your business as a leader in the market, you will be received as a leader in the market. An extension of this is that the trust you gain from the quality of design will reduce the customers resistance when you cross-sell other products / services.

    Tips for the Business Card:

    1. Only included the necessary information – website, contact name, contact number, email address etc. (ie. no need for ABNs or physical addresses of warehouses etc, unless customers collect from there).
    2. Make sure your logo / brand is clear and prominent.

    Tips for the Company Stamp:

    1. Keep it clean and simple – complex logos are hard to remember. http://www.brandcrowd.com/ has some good logos for inspiration.
    2. Select the right colour palette – http://www.colourlovers.com has plenty of colour palettes that work well together.
    3. Logo type / fonts are very important – Don’t neglect to do some research!

    Hope this information helps. Good luck!

    FS Concierge, post: 157522 wrote:
    Hi asmgx and Sign Here Graphix,

    Just to add a different viewpoint here, my experience has been the exact reverse of this.

    In my marketing consulting and copywriting business I predominantly work with businesses in the natural health industry. Most of my work comes from my industry network or via word of mouth (which, of course is an extension of my network).

    My logo and branding for that business has been carefully designed to reflect my specialisation in that niche market as well as my own personality (you can check it out on my website if you’re interested). Whenever I hand out my business card to someone in that industry, it becomes a talking point immediately. When that person is not someone I’ve already done business with, it becomes the STARTING point for my marketing, immediately communicating my expertise and specialisation.

    Even though my other business is business-to-consumer (rather than B2B like the one above), the business cards have the same effect. They’re vibrant and quirky, and we’ve purposely designed our branding to have completely different energy and personality to others in our niche market. People always comment, and often head to our website to learn more.

    I’m not saying the same would hold true for everyone, but in my opinion, the investment I’ve made in quality design and quality printing and materials for my business cards has been well worth it.

    I’ll be interested in other’s thoughts, but in my experience asmgx, it is worth putting as much effort into the marketing and branding angle or your cards as to getting all the right details on them.

    Good luck designing yours, and I hope you love what you end up with as much as I love mine!

    Jayne

    #1137985
    Chris H
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    • Total posts: 111
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    Can I just add NO COMIC SANS! 😡
    HATE IT!!!

    I believe a business card is a marketing tool, I hand them out to all my customers at every meeting even if they already have it, I’ll leave one with the secretary, there’s one in every proposal I present, I can’t help it….

    Fantastic marketing tool as when the customer has a couple he’s likely to give one to someone who asks after you. I also don’t think it hurts that there’s two in his roladex, one in the top draw etc etc.

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