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  • #966860
    Lizzie
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    I belong to forums for freelancers and will be posting about this there, too, because it’s more targeted to that area. I’m just wondering what people put on their business cards. The basics, obviously, but do you have “tag lines,” so to speak? THe cards I’m replacing trumpeted “professional press and public relations,” but a) I don’t like that anymore and b) I want to focus more on writing, and not so much “promotions” or “public relations.” Those are different things. So I’m playing around with different phrases or identities, for lack of a better word. (And better words are in short supply right now, as I’m just sitting down with my first cup of coffee and not enough sleep!)

    I checked some freelancer sites earlier, and people are all over the map about whether to include a rundown of the kinds of work you do, too. I’m leaning against a laundry list, but haven’t decided.

    Just wondering if people here have any thoughts.

    #1021533
    SteveDavidson
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    Maybe put the list on the back of the card in bullet point form, 85% grey?

    #1021534
    Lizzie
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    SteveDavidson, post: 25992 wrote:
    Maybe put the list on the back of the card in bullet point form, 85% grey?

    I found that on a freelancing website, as well as from your suggestion — and I think it’s a great idea. Some people frown on putting things on the back, but it’s there for those who do see it and for those who don’t — well, it wouldn’t be on the front in any case. Thanks.

    #1021535
    TDGDESIGN
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    Hi Lizzie,

    I am a graphic designer and I agree. The best place for your laundry list is the back of the card. In my opinion keep the front minimal and clean and put the rest on the back. I have kept most business cards that I have come across during my travels and sometimes they have been inspirational when it comes to doing your own.
    The current trend for cards is a shallower card not the standard 90mm x 55mm which generally means you have to put info on the back anyway.

    #1021536
    Lizzie
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    TDGDESIGN, post: 26116 wrote:
    Hi Lizzie,

    I am a graphic designer and I agree. The best place for your laundry list is the back of the card. In my opinion keep the front minimal and clean and put the rest on the back. I have kept most business cards that I have come across during my travels and sometimes they have been inspirational when it comes to doing your own.
    The current trend for cards is a shallower card not the standard 90mm x 55mm which generally means you have to put info on the back anyway.

    Why shallower? Does it make it stand out in some way? Just wondering. That seems curious to me.

    #1021537
    TDGDESIGN
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    Lizzie, post: 26153 wrote:
    Why shallower? Does it make it stand out in some way? Just wondering. That seems curious to me.

    Exactly – in a group of cards anything different will stand out. Of course, once everyone does it, then it no longer has that effect.
    My own cards are 50mm deep and when you compare that to a standard 55mm deep card, the standard ones look too fat.
    I have a card from a Barrister that is 38mm deep with just his name and “Barrister” on the front – it looks very authoratative.
    I usually let aesthetics dictate the depth of the card. There is a “correct” amount of white space around the type or logo you have on the card.
    In my time, I have seen round cornered cards, totally circular cards, 4 page cards, flapped cards, translucent cards and even cards on aluminium and clear plastic. (You would not want to carry round a wallet full of the aluminium ones though). The aluminium ones were for a trophy supply company so it made sense.
    Above all, your business card should try to reflect your company’s personality, so a client can get a feel for who you are as well as what you do.

    #1021538
    Lizzie
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    I’m getting closer on my card (I was so swamped with actual work and potential work a few weeks ago I put it on a back burner) — and thanks for all the input.

    My designer has offered to do her work in a barter arrangement. She wants to get her web site up and running, so she’ll do my work, if I write content for her. I know myself well enough to know I’ll overdo her stuff, so it may be more advantageous for her. On the other hand, I need to do more web writing, for my own skills. So it will be good for me, too, in the long run.

    Now I’m working on my “tag line,” or whatever you want to call it. Coming up with things like, “when words matter,” When words count, “words that matter,” “putting it into words” and “a way with words.” That’s all I have so far.

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