Home – New Forums New here? Share your story Carbon fiber scooters – Sydney

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  • #986652
    TransScooters
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    • Total posts: 14
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    Hi everyone!

    I have been lurking around these forums (and learning an awful lot!) for quite some time and have now decided it is time to sign in and say hello! For the last couple of years I have been making carbon fiber and bamboo scooters and have recently been making my first production model (https://www.facebook.com/TransScooters). To make these, I am 3d printing the moulds and dissolvable mandrels and laying them up with carbon fiber and epoxy. I plan to produce about 10 – 20 of these for testing and if successful put them on some kind of crowd sourcing site.

    I have just arrived back from Oslo (7 months), so am currently looking for a small workshop around the inner west of Sydney to continue my building. I look forward to meeting as many of you as possible and chatting about all kinds of business related things.

    If anyone is interested in something hiking/ packrafting related or composite/ 3d printing related drop me a line!

    All the best,

    Jeremy.

    #1158896
    Robert Gerrish
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    What an awesome project you’re working on Jeremy. Thanks for joining the forums, please keep us posted with your progress.

    Robert and the FS Crew

    #1158897
    No Limits
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    Hi Jeremy,

    Sounds really interesting, hope it goes well.
    Do you have a 3D prrinter or do you outsource that part.
    I’m really interested in the 3D printing part of what your doing.
    What are the costs like?

    No Limits

    #1158898
    TransScooters
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    Hi Robert and No limits, thanks for the replies.

    No limits: I am currently inbetween 3d printers (will hopefully have one by next month), so am using the p2p network Makexyz.com which is by far your cheapest option. I have been using a guy called Joel Hackett and have so far been very impressed. The 2 halves of the mould in my recent post + a mandrel came to around $70.

    What kinds of things are you interested in printing?

    All the best,
    Jeremy.

    #1158899
    No Limits
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    Hi Jeremy,

    I’m just fascinated with 3D printing in general, it’s amazing.
    I actually think it’s a great business opportunity to be the 3D printer service provider and make prototypes, parts and items for customers.
    Although if they end up becoming too cheap, everybody will buy one.
    Do you know how much the printers and materials costs are?

    No Limits

    #1158900
    TransScooters
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    Indeed 3d printers are pretty sweet! There are a couple of people already offering this service around Sydney and assume they are making a fairly good return.

    As for printing costs, there would be in excess of 10 methods of 3d printing including Fused filament, SLA, SLS, metal bot type machines, cell based machines etc which each have their pros and cons. I am using the cheapest (fused filament) process, which builds up layers of melted plastic but only has a resolution of about 100 microns (.1mm) and can leave some z banding. The most popular of these machines is the makerbot replicator 2 (about $2500), though semi-industrial large build volume machines cost around $5000 (e.g. gigabot or 3d monstr) while high resolution (SLA) resin based machines cost between $2000 – $5000 (e.g. pegasus touch and Form 1).

    The machines I am considering are the rigidbot ($1400), gmax ($1500) and the phoenix 3d printer. These use spools of extruded plastic which cost between $20 – $30 a pound (a little under 500g), though you can get the prices down to $3-4 by using an extruder like the filastruder. Also, because you can use a bunch of plastics like PLA, ABS, Nylon and HIPS you have a lot of flexibility (e.g. HIPS is dissolvable and Nylons are chemically resistant).

    Jeremy.

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