Home – New Forums Tech talk Cheap NAS – any recommendations?

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #970671
    victorng
    Member
    • Total posts: 626
    Up
    0
    ::

    Seeing as there are quite a few IT savvy folk here, I’m looking at the Western Digital My Book World Network Storage Drive and the Seagate GoFlex Home Network Storage System to add a bit of much needed space at home – both are around $200.

    Does anyone have any recommendations at this bottom end of the market?

    Cheers
    Victor

    #1045479
    DavidThomas
    Member
    • Total posts: 265
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Victor,

    I would suggest it doesn’t particularly matter which device/brand you purchase they are all as likely to fail as each other. I worked in IT for a while and saw every single brand of hardware fail over time.

    Just come up with a backup solution for your backups (eg. DVD backup once a month or something) and check warranties & keep copies of receipts.

    Goodluck with it.

    #1045480
    exstatic
    Member
    • Total posts: 335
    Up
    0
    ::

    In the office we run a WD MyBook and it’s not to bad.. out of the box it does the things it says, if you need it to do any more than hold files and backups then maybe go for something else – as it can be a bit hard to tweak.

    At home I have a Dlink DNS 323 which is pretty awesome, does everything from website hosting through to sharing my movies with my PVR – although doesn’t play very well with OSX Time Machine.

    The other great thing about the DNS 323 is you can put whatever size disks you want in it and operate them in a RAID config.

    I hope that helps.

    #1045481
    mike_allen
    Member
    • Total posts: 74
    Up
    0
    ::

    I’m using a shotgun approach, but what I should be doing is using something like the Dlink DNS 323 with two disks in it, mirrored (RAID 1), for protection against disk failure. I recently had a disk failure and recovered using a combination of backups and online storage. I’ve also been looking at LiveDrive, SkyDrive and Norton whatever it is online backup. Of course you need good line speed for effective online storage so, if you’re going to see NBN in the near future, I’d go for that. I’ve also got an old PC setup as a file server and a WD Elements drive so I just need a real NAS to complete the collection!

    #1045482
    peppie
    Member
    • Total posts: 525
    Up
    0
    ::

    I have 2 My Books that I started using as raid 0, that is, the 2 drives just combine to 1 big drive. I intended to use these as 2 totally separate units for archiving working files to for my studio. But,,, the big problem i found was the access speed over the network is pretty terrible, even though they are supposed to be 1GB/s. Large video files for ex. just take far too long to transfer.

    So, I only use those drives now for basically office type files and I archive media files to big removable SATA hard drives in one of my studio computers.

    Coming from an electronics background I have no confidence whatsoever in raid systems for one main reason. If the raid controller carks it it could well take out one or more hard drive with it, meaning, the perceived advantage of being able to rebuild a failed drive from another is totally lost because you have now possibly lost access to ANY drive – and of course all your data.

    My solution? To archive to 2 physically separate drives and then store them in 2 separate locations. I generally use removable hard drives for projects and to that i have added an Addonics housing which takes up 3 bays and houses 4 removable drives. You can get 3 and 5 drive housings and they can be used for raid set ups, but I like it as separate drives.

    Just my way of doing things and may not suit everyone, but much more secure for my liking.

    #1045483
    IT Advocate
    Member
    • Total posts: 195
    Up
    0
    ::
    peppie, post: 55494 wrote:
    I have 2 My Books that I started using as raid 0, that is, the 2 drives just combine to 1 big drive.

    You should never ever use RAID 0 as a storage method. RAID 0 is data striping where is places half the data on each disk, giving you greater read/write performance and a much higher chance of total data loss.

    The saying goes, Its called RAID ZERO cos ZERO is what you have when a disk dies.

    As the other posts have mentioned any drive or RAID 1 mirror can fail (hit with a power spike, raid controller failure) or the whole unit can be stolen. Although unlikely it does happen.

    No matter what you purchase, make sure it has an easy USB backup. Some NAS devices have a One Touch Backup, where you plug in a USB hard drive , hit a button and it copies across all your data. This external drive would then be taken offsite.

    Lower priced NAS boxes are not good performers, if its only you accessing it you should be OK. For more users you should look at a real NAS, not a consumer device. Either way you still need external offsite backup.

    Harris Technology (ht.com.au) has a good range of NAS units. Some are available with external access so you can get to your files from outside the network.

    #1045484
    peppie
    Member
    • Total posts: 525
    Up
    0
    ::
    IT Advocate, post: 55516 wrote:
    You should never ever use RAID 0 as a storage method. RAID 0 is data striping where is places half the data on each disk, giving you greater read/write performance and a much higher chance of total data loss.
    You miss my point OR I have been remiss in making myself clearer.

    I do not use raid as such because of the dangers (as I see them). In the case of the Mybooks, I never intended to use them as a raid unit, I only purchased them because the biggest drives available at the time were 500 GB and at least with 2 in the box I had 1 TB. Now 2 TB drives are cheap so I just use individual drives. The Mybooks just do a bit of a background service now.

    Depending on your level of technical expertise there is really no problem going for 2 separate drives in 2 separate buildings, say, over a network and set backup software to save to both. I don’t see any problem with that as a viable option. It can in fact be much easier to set that up than a raid system!!!

    #1045485
    victorng
    Member
    • Total posts: 626
    Up
    0
    ::

    Thanks for all the replies guys.

    Got the WD My World – will use it for storage and plug in a USB hard drive for backup. Copying data on to the WD seems quite slow though …

    Cheers
    Victor

    #1045486
    IT Advocate
    Member
    • Total posts: 195
    Up
    0
    ::
    victorng, post: 55557 wrote:
    Copying data on to the WD seems quite slow though …

    Transfer speed can be effected by a few factors.

    If high performance was important maybe a business grade (instead of consumer) NAS would have been a better choice. The QNAP from HT.com.au starts around $250.

    QNAP TS-110 – Hi-Speed USB / Gigabit Ethernet / eSATA-300 $263

    QNAP TS-210 – Hi-Speed USB / Gigabit Ethernet / RAID 1 mirror redundancy – $336

    edit: QNAP TS-110 available from Umart at $223

    #1045487
    Steve – Adoria Photo
    Member
    • Total posts: 47
    Up
    0
    ::

    Forget the Harvey Norman NAS boxes.

    I am delighted with my Synology Ds411j.

    Just under $400 without hard drives, add up to four 2tb drives at just over $100 each.

    Set up is very easy, just follow the wizard to get raid 5
    Configured.

    The web interface is very user friendly, just like Mac osx.

    Tons of features and quite fast with a gigabit network connection.

    I use mine for apple time machine backups, streaming Hd movies via a media player, pc, iPhone or iPad, peer to peer downloading, hosting a wordpress web server and more.

    Cheers, Steve

    #1045488
    bradzo
    Member
    • Total posts: 335
    Up
    0
    ::

    Has anyone tried freenas?

    http://www.freenas.org/

    Software certainly, but after reading some of the other posts:


    @peppie
    – yes, if the controller goes, you’re toast. (Dealing with that at the moment just quietly!)

    Here’s some good info re RAID:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

    Off-site backups are still necessary though.

    This is an hilarious walk-through of a thief stealing a “hacker”s PC – and how the thief got caught – although take the owners comments re offsite backups as “being gospel” – not safe for work. #NSFW !!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4oB28ksiIo

    Thanks!

    #1045489
    IgniteDM
    Member
    • Total posts: 99
    Up
    0
    ::

    1million votes for anything QNAP. We have one at home that we use personally.

    We recommend them to clients all the time. We are yet to experience an issue with any QNAP device (aside from needing ones that have more drive bays).

    We have sold cheaper ones (i.e. Thecus) to clients who wanted the budget option – and they did nothing but whinge about the speed of them. You get what you pay for !

    Have seen other clients with Netgear NAS devices that had strange software issues that could not be fixed (even with firmware updates).

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.