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  • #975421
    Chris’s Signs
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    Hi Everyone,
    i have a question, heres two scenarios…

    suburb 1 has 6 business that do exactly the same as what you do, and i live in that suburb…(currently work from home)

    suburb 2 has 1 business that operates from home and is 25mins drive from where i live,its not as big but it is a growing town.

    i want to get a factory and unsure which spot to go, if i open in sub.1 there’s huge healthy competition, which gives customers heaps of opportunity to shop around.

    i know they still can in suburb 2, but to me this location would be better….

    looking forward to hearing your views….
    Chris

    #1074290
    MattR
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    Questions:

    1) how do potential clients/customers find your (type) of business?
    2) do they really care where you are located?
    3) are there infrastructure costs that make one area prohibitive over another e.g. transport ?
    4) can you easily market to other areas but be based at X?

    #1074291
    Calcul8or
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    On a slightly different tangent, I once owned a restaurant in partnership which the original owner had set up smack-bang in the middle of suburbia, right next door to the local milk bar.

    Now, conventional wisdom will tell you, over and again, that considerations for foot traffic and general exposure are essential components of any decision process involved in setting up a restaurant, of all things. Well, contrary to that exact same conventional wisdom, this little restaurant thrived for 12 years, and gained a bit of a following among some celebrity clientelle, as well as people who lived considerable distances away.

    The moral of the story is simply that even the most established ideas about location can sometimes be proven completely wrong, or wanting at best. It all depends on your overall strategy, and the way you go about attracting attention to yourself, which can overcome such hurdles and prove the naysayers wrong.

    As with Matt’s suggestion above, it may be possible for you to be located in suburb 1, but market to suburb 2….which is probably what the current competition in suburb 1 are doing anyway. As Matt also said, it is also important to consider how people find services like yours. Sometimes, being located near your competition is a good thing if people are in the habit of strolling into shops when looking for your kind of service.

    Programmer. Analyst. Nerd. Calcul8ors.com.au Custom Software & Collaboration
    #1074292
    Chris’s Signs
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    Thanks Guys,
    in the way i see it, factories dont get the foot traffic as such, as far as marketing theres no limit on where i would go do do signs in a 200kms radius, the work ive been doing is very spread out.
    its kind of like the car yard setups, there might be 5 yards all in a row, all competing for the sale, low balling each other to sell.

    #1074293
    AgentMail
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    My personal opinion is that these days, most people will get a good few quotes before making a decision, so whether you are the only one in the vicinity, or one of 20, the internet is at everyones fingertips.

    There is another reason that all those car yards, and all those real estate agents are banked together – it creates more customers to the same area. It could work the same for you. If you know you are good, you will be better than the other shops and people will realise that.

    On top of this, having your site close to where you live is a godsend if you have to work back late, pop in on the weekend etc. – The work/life balance bit ;)

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