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  • #966492
    Gavin
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    I see alot of people here using WordPress, Joomla and SBI, I havent used any of these

    I’m currently using Drupal which I am absolutely addicted to and have been able to do everything I’ve wanted to thus far but, I have some domains that I would like to develop which requires a search through avaliable datafeeds. can anyone suggest a CMS that is capable of this? The sites I’ve seen that have this functionality are built in-house.

    Whats your CMS of choice and why?

    #1018798
    ray_223
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    Hi Gavin,

    Drupal is my first choice … although I haven’t had the need to:

    “search through available datafeeds” (whatever that means?).

    I’m sure this could be done with a custom module or even some PHP code added to a node.

    Drupal is right for me because it is well designed and consistent (I assume the other CMS’s have improved recently but I haven’t kept up to date). Also the huge number of addon modules is awesome! (Views and CCK just to start with!). Themeing was probably a little more difficult then other CMS’s but I believe now at Version 6 Drupal is at least as good as any other and with Version 7 out sometime next year will only get better.

    More recently the number of books and video courses has grown so if you do have a particular problem you want solved somewhere somehow someone has probably solved something very similar and documented it well.

    My only “niggle” with Drupal is that it is built on PHP – not my favorite language – but for reasonably simple websites is very adequate.

    I’d probably choose Django/Python for a “webapp” type of webpage and Drupal for a more regular web site.

    #1018799
    Gavin
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    ray_223, post: 21766 wrote:
    Hi Gavin,

    Drupal is my first choice … although I haven’t had the need to:

    “search through available datafeeds” (whatever that means?).

    I’m glad there are other drupalers here :) I need somthing I can upload affiliate datafeeds to. (a xml or CVS file from a merchant listing all their products) .. playing with node_import and uber cart atm and getting close :) Might just have to pay a developer for some aditional functionality. It’s the last stage of development I’m looking into for my site, so i would have a sub domain that would list/compare prices like… myshopping.com.au as well as the main site that lists the businesses.

    ray_223, post: 21766 wrote:
    Drupal is right for me because it is well designed and consistent (I assume the other CMS’s have improved recently but I haven’t kept up to date). Also the huge number of addon modules is awesome! (Views and CCK just to start with!). Themeing was probably a little more difficult then other CMS’s but I believe now at Version 6 Drupal is at least as good as any other and with Version 7 out sometime next year will only get better.

    I couldn’t agree more about the number of addon modules for functionality, so far I have been able to do just about anything. With theming I’ve been using Artisteer, easy enough to create a simple template :)

    #1018800
    Chris Bates
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    I use Joomla (which is Drupal’s sister), and the main reason is because I know it.

    I’ve LOOKED at Drupal before, but was sort of put off by re-doing the learning curve thing, when the pros and cons came out about even.

    I’m happy with Joomla, there’s a lot of commercial and non-commercial content out there to extend it, and I find it easy to use and design.

    #1018801
    JohnSheppard
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    Most experienced programmers seem to choose Drupal…

    Myself I use Joomla mainly because I had my doubts as to end users (small business) being able to figure out Drupal without holding hands…say for an enterprise market that’s not really an issue though….

    If the end user is in *full* control word-press is the go I reckon…

    I’m making the transition from .net….I kinda hate PHP, but Dotnetnuke…*puke*…and there’s not much else in the way of non-commercial dotnet CMS…if there was I’d go back there in a millisecond…

    In the end with software dev the wisest thing you can do is use what everyone else does even if you think the other tech is better….As ray mentioned, they all catch up to one another…features change, things change…if it’s popular, you can’t go too far wrong even if your chosen system is currently behind…

    One things certain, and that’s change, who knows…people might wake up and realise HMTL/AJAX sucks really bad and try to change it all ;)

    #1018802
    bal1974
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    I am trying to find the best CMS to me, and a webshop, which can do software download. But my problem is – which CMS should I choose?

    I am thinking to use bigcommerce.com as my webshop, because I can sell software through this webshop.

    But what about CMS?

    I have no experience in develop in html, or other codes. What I need is, I need a CMS which can:

    • Use flash
    • Can use html from Dreamwever
    • have template

    Can you recommend a CMS, where I can do it my selves with my lack of web developing?
    Merry Christmas from Denmark

    #1018803
    onlineiq
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    • Total posts: 93
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    So far everyone has talked about open source CMS’s which most definitely have their plus side – being free, having lots of contributed modules and able to be hosted very cheaply.

    However I think there is a down side to open source for the end user client, as products are not always bug free, and they then have to pay for them to be tweaked and fixed. When new fixes and versions come along, sites need to be upgraded, and if they have had significant customisations, this is not so easy.

    I have chosen to use a commercial CMS solution for myself and my clients because these issues do not arise. Once a site is built (on servers dedicated to the platform) any upgrades are applied automatically to the site – so there is a seamless continuous improvement process which occurs.

    Hosting costs are a bit more expensive but they include all seamless upgrades, functionality, 24/7 forum support and a ticketing system for issues which get fixed without needing to pay extra. E-commerce functionality, and Customer Relationship Management functionality can be switched on quickly and easily.

    And from a risk management point of view as a website builder (and not a hosting specialist), I know I don’t need to worry about the hosting environment at all – it can get tricky working on numerous servers with their various idiosyncrasies. If there is an issue, I know it will get fixed without me (or my clients) needing to pay anything extra.

    In my other job I work with Moodle, Zen Cart & Joomla on a daily basis, and while I absolutely appreciate what open source offers, I prefer the peace of mind and functionality of what I use. For someone who is not hugely techie its a great, peaceful choice:)

    Ursh
    __________________
    http://www.onlineiq.biz
    smarter websites

    #1018804
    ray_223
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    However I think there is a down side to open source for the end user client, as products are not always bug free, and they then have to pay for them to be tweaked and fixed. When new fixes and versions come along, sites need to be upgraded, and if they have had significant customisations, this is not so easy.

    There is no reason why you can’t hire people to do this for an open source product if you don’t have the knowledge or the time.

    Depending on the company you buy your closed source solutions from there is no guarantee that the support will end better then obtaining support through open source channels (sometimes it is totally the opposite to what many people might think!).

    The big benefit of Open Source is that you don’t get tied down to an individual company.

    #1018805
    JohnSheppard
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    onlineiq, post: 21910 wrote:
    I have chosen to use a commercial CMS solution for myself and my clients because these issues do not arise. Once a site is built (on servers dedicated to the platform) any upgrades are applied automatically to the site – so there is a seamless continuous improvement process which occurs.

    Hosting costs are a bit more expensive but they include all seamless upgrades, functionality, 24/7 forum support and a ticketing system for issues which get fixed without needing to pay extra. E-commerce functionality, and Customer Relationship Management functionality can be switched on quickly and easily.

    All those things can be provided by the right open source supplier if you wanted to…there is a lot to be said for ultra crappy extensions in the Joomla community though…in the beginning that sent me packing multiple times in search of a different CMS….

    I’ll wildly speculate that in the long term you’ll see drupal (in particular) and joomla going the way of linux distros….that is, managed distributions….etc…at least that’s what I think perhaps say http://acquia.com/ are somewhat trying to get in on…..

    #1018806
    JohnSheppard
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    bal1974, post: 21894 wrote:
    Can you recommend a CMS, where I can do it my selves with my lack of web developing?
    Merry Christmas from Denmark

    If you don’t want to become a web developer I suggest you pay a professional. It’s cheaper and allows you to specialise on what you do. If not I guess I would say wordpress as the learning curve is the smallest…

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