Home – New Forums Marketing mastery Dropping in to introduce yourself… old fashioned?

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  • #983699
    encore4deb
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    Hi all

    After a 10 month break from my business I have decided to ramp up again (with much enthusiasm I might add) and have decided to market my services to businesses in my suburb.

    Is the notion of ‘dropping in’ to see people and perhaps leave promo material an old fashioned idea now days?

    I know as a receptionist from way back that I always handed on info that came into the office as I admired people that would take the time to go door to door.

    Interested in your thougths and thanks in advance.

    Deb

    #1143767
    Anonymous
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    Hi Deb,

    Welcome to the forum, and good on you for getting things up and running again!

    I’ll be interested in what others have to say, but for my two cents worth, I think that the answer to your question is ‘It depends…’

    The more you can tell us about the type of business it is and who the target market are, the better we’ll be able to contribute our thoughts.

    Nice to meet you, by the way,
    Jayne

    #1143768
    Kestrelassist
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    Hi Deb, I think it’s a good way. It’s a bit tougher because you get the knock backs face to face, but similarly,you can stick your foot in the door and the client can get to know a little bit about you and form the positive opinion that they mightn’t with say , an email intro. Worst thing that could happen is a networking opportunity. Alan

    #1143769
    encore4deb
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    Thanks Alan, thanks Jayne

    I provide admin/secretarial support virtually (yes, VA) or preference is onsite assistance – we have so many businesses in my area and all businesses need admin so I want to capture those that need ad hoc assistance in order to provide a resource that they can pick up and put down in line with the ever changing state of business.

    First things first though I need to get out and let them know I’m here; hence the reason for dropping by and introducing myself – agreed though that rejection could be hard to take but no pain no gain…

    #1143770
    bluepenguin
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    I think it’s fine, as long as you’re only dropping in to introduce yourself, and not to pressure sell – there are enough slimy salespeople in the world.

    I would simply aim to be pleasant and memorable, and if budget permits, drop off something useful like a promo pen, calendar, mars bar, etc.

    #1143771
    Justin Laju
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    Encore4Deb, post: 164543 wrote:
    Hi all

    After a 10 month break from my business I have decided to ramp up again (with much enthusiasm I might add) and have decided to market my services to businesses in my suburb.

    Is the notion of ‘dropping in’ to see people and perhaps leave promo material an old fashioned idea now days?

    I know as a receptionist from way back that I always handed on info that came into the office as I admired people that would take the time to go door to door.

    Interested in your thougths and thanks in advance.

    Deb

    Hi Deb

    Old fashioned is the new “in fashion”.

    As we move into a new world, things are changing rapidly. People are going to appreciate real, earnest, honest approaches.

    You feel like quite a “straight up” nice, down to earth personality – so use that.

    As we move forward, over the next few years, people are going to be gravitating toward real “heart-based” connections. Get out and meet people, deliver something for them to consider and remember you, and keep going.

    It is no different to getting on the phone and calling them, only over the phone you can cover more ground.

    Rejection smecksion! You are not out there looking for people who don’t want your services. You are only looking for those that do want you, or might have cause to require your services in the future. So, a rejection from someone that doesn’t want it – has no power. It only has the power that you give it. It may build upon you when you are getting rejection after rejection, though, even when they are not quality prospects. That is a deep subconscious remnant of our “herd mentality” ancestors – we have an unconscious desire to be accepted – but holding strong and positively reinforcing yourself will convert that.

    So, yes it can be a great way to build your business.

    Jumping on the phone can be even better though, as you can cover more ground. You can also follow up via email , database easier, and get organised, systematic, consistent and more stable.

    Whatever approach works for you really, but throw caution to the wind when it comes to old fashioned. Warren Buffet, the worlds most successful investor doesn’t even use a computer.

    #1143772
    Chris H
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    Hi Deb,

    I really admire your enthusiasm and if you knock on doors, I am sure you will succeed.
    For me “knocking on doors” is not a “maybe” or “sometimes” proposition but it should ALWAYS be part of any business.
    I sell equipment to a variety of businesses from “Mum and Dad” operations through to multinationals and orders in the vicinity of a million dollars have resulted from a knock at the door.

    My normal approach is to enter the reception and explain who I am and what I do, before asking who the best person in the organisation would be to send my material to. In some cases I have had a chance to meet MD’s on that first visit and at least 90% of the time people will give me the card of the right person to speak to. In some cases their Business card will be in a stand on the reception counter. This simple contact is like gold, the most important piece of information you need in any sales process is the right person to talk to.

    My normal mode of operation is to get the card and email or post relevant information and then follow it up with a phone call to make an appointment.

    Knocking on doors also is a great tool for measuring the success of your pitch and refining it. It may be my crazy side coming out but nothing fills me with energy and enthusiasm like a successful cold call.

    Good luck Deb, go knock ’em dead!

    Cheers,

    Chris

    #1143773
    Janella
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    It’s a great idea. If you have beautiful handwriting, it might be worth grabbing attention with a handwritten note to pass on to the boss.

    #1143774
    MH08
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    I don’t think face to face will ever become old fashioned, I also believe most business owners revert to technology as a easy way out and in my eyes, down right lazy.

    One of the best PRO’s to a face to face, you can see why the rejection is happening, whilst over the phone you can only work off the tone of voice and the call could be taken in a place that’s out of the prospect’s element.

    More often than not rejection can be avoided by first qualifying if the prospect needs your service/product before wasting another breath.

    I’m all for face to face meetings.

    #1143775
    Divert To Mobile
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    Could be old fashioned which is perhaps why I like it.

    Frankly if someone walked into my office and said “Hi Im Deb, I specialise in short term admin work in this local area and remote. I have an abn and am GST registered. Could I leave you a brochure ?”

    Id say absolutely and if I wasnt in the middle of something I’d probably offer you a cup of coffee and have a chat to gauge if you would be someone I could work with or recommend to others.

    My opinion. Go for it.

    Steve

    #1143776
    Kerryellen Studios
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    Would you believe, I’m in the process of doing this to promote my business. As a designer in a regional area, I won’t get picked up if nobody knows I’m there, and in fact it is common that the city designers will get the job. I’m in construction, and I’ve found it a really positive experience to me
    et architects and builders face to face. I call them up first, tell them who I am and what I do, and arrange for a time to meet them face to face so they know who I am in the community. Most times it’s a quick ten minute chat in the office, sometimes a meet over coffee. I hand them a brief letter covering my services and prices which has been received really well, and now for the next step – turning it into business! I think this is now where I go back to the desk and follow up with the good old email.

    Kerry
    http://www.kerryellenstudios.com.au

    #1143777
    Upward Dog
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    Great discussion…

    My partner and I are in the startup phase of a new business. My last venture was a retail operation that was 95% online and the rest at special events. In hindsight, I can see that the effort I put into the digital side was much greater than the face-to-face side. If I had shifted the focus, it likely would have grown beyond what I might have imagined. With this new enterprise, we are focused on community, which means, first and foremost, relationship. While we are both still tied to devices, I think that for us, the writing is on the wall that things like listening and engaging with customers directly is much more valuable in our situation than trying to get more “likes” or buying email lists. This is still the nature of many small businesses, and more will, over time, come back to their “old-fashioned” roots to find success.

    Best wishes, Deb.

    #1143778
    Anonymous
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    sacredimagining, post: 166082 wrote:
    Great discussion…

    My partner and I are in the startup phase of a new business. My last venture was a retail operation that was 95% online and the rest at special events. In hindsight, I can see that the effort I put into the digital side was much greater than the face-to-face side. If I had shifted the focus, it likely would have grown beyond what I might have imagined. With this new enterprise, we are focused on community, which means, first and foremost, relationship. While we are both still tied to devices, I think that for us, the writing is on the wall that things like listening and engaging with customers directly is much more valuable in our situation than trying to get more “likes” or buying email lists. This is still the nature of many small businesses, and more will, over time, come back to their “old-fashioned” roots to find success.

    Best wishes, Deb.

    Hi Deb,

    Just wanted to thank you for sharing your experiences here, and to welcome you to Flying Solo. :)

    When you get a moment, we’d love it if you’d pop over to the New members section of the forum and introduce yourself and your business. (I love you forum name, by the way ;)

    Great to meet you,
    Jayne

    #1143779
    Trish4
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    Hi Deb

    Not unlike you I am too about to embark on a similar idea having completed a full time 6 month contract and needing to ramp things up again. As with many of the other contributors, I think that the personal touch is appreciated these days (at least I am counting on it). It’s encouraging to hear that others feel the same.

    Whilst the face to face interaction may or may not bring immediate results, it still puts your name out there and creates some personal credibility for what you offer. I rehearse for these conversations regularly. Try practising in front of the mirror before you go out. It is really hard to do but a great way to tweak the message.

    I hope it all goes really well for you.

    Trish

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