Home – New Forums Selling online Drupal, Joomla or WordPress for a small ecommerce site?

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  • #987884
    emaderam
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    I’m going to build a good-looking business website to sell bicycles, but want the easiest way to build. I’m looking for a user-friendly CMS to create the main structure of my site. If you have a look at http://www.threehosts.com/ratings/wordpress-vs-joomla-vs-drupal.html you can see they have provided a collection of websites created with WP, Drupal and Joomla. How can I know that if these websites are really built with the claimed software? And how can I know if they have used any template for their sites or they have only used the standard features of software? Now I’m uncertain between WP and Joomla. What’s your recommendation? Tnx.

    #1164721
    Greg_M
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    If your primary requirement is Ecommerce, why are you looking at any of them?

    They can all do it, but they are primarily CMS’s, not shopping carts.

    I’d be more concerned about the ability and experience of the people building the site than the platform. The CMS itself won’t save you, there’s hundreds of posts on here of problematic shopping sites on just about every platform out there.

    It’s way too simplistic to go WordPress vs Joomla, that’s a debate that got boring several years ago.

    If you want easy to build and DIY … your chances of success are slim imo, but I’d start with Bigcommerce, Shopify etc etc, all will be superior to a home made, plug in type add on to a CMS.

    Why would anyone even want to scam you on the CMS they’re using? Can’t see any point, but if you go to the source code of the page displayed (view source in your browser) there’ll be plenty of clues to the framework used and the plugins installed.

    As for templates, if you want to reinvent the wheel and have the money and skill to do it, that’s great. Some templates are put together by leading designers that specialise in same, and will exceed the quality of any “B” grade bespoke design.

    Given that there’s nothing wrong with good templates, beware (be very aware) of so called designers flogging you a template (perhaps with minor changes and your copy) and charging for a ground up, bespoke design. Sometimes the give aways on whether it’s a template will be in the page source code as well.

    My 2 cents.

    #1164722
    affgar
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    I would definitely say in answer to your question go for WordPress.

    WordPress is very user friendly, ranks well (when setup correctly with regular blogging), has a huge following & community behind it, is always being updated & improved, loads of plugins & user friendly features that can be added.

    The backend CMS of WordPress is absolutely user friendly & beautiful. Like everything, if you are new to it, take some time to explore. Setup a test website if you like with free templates. WordPress provide free templates that look pretty simple & effective out of the box. Add woocommerce & see how you go. Woocommerce is free … though, you don’t get support unless you pay for an upgrade of a product ie theme, plugin or woocommerce extension.

    The beauty of going with a Theme Developer is that they can help you with problems you face related to theme responding to ecommerce & plugins. Theme Devs will not always help you make wild modifications with your website with their help.

    What I could recommend is this …. take a look at Elegant Themes. They are a great WordPress Dev Company (quite cheap for what they offer) who provide lots of themes for a yearly fee or lifetime package. They can also help you with any questions or problems you face with your website.

    Elegant Themes with Woocommerce is a very sound combination. Then get good SEO plugin (as you upload content, so you can get it right from the start), then you can add a good security plugin etc…

    Starting your website off on a very small budget with no monthly fees for shopping carts etc … is a huge advantage.

    The days of any one CMS being restricted for certain use is really over (for your needs) … If you needed a more powerful backend & database functionality I may make a different recommendation …. But definitely go with WordPress in my opinion.

    It costs nothing to start a WordPress account … take a look.
    Have you got your domain name yet? Sorted out your host company?

    Exciting times ahead. It won’t be easy, there will be many hours put in above what you thought you were going to have to do. And at times you will be frustrated.

    If you have any further questions … fire away. :D

    #1164723
    LucasArthur
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    Hi First Time Poster (would put name but you appear to have not introduced yourself yet),

    This query has been posed many times in the forums, a quick search of the forums will find many recent and relevant posts with lots of info about the sites you are querying (or mechanisms behind them) that may offer much assistance in your quest.

    The answer will ultimately come down to how comfortable you are with it, what platform will it be deployed on, hosting, turn over, merchant set up, etc etc etc

    Wishing you all the best in your adventures..

    Jason

    Jason Ramage | Lucas Arthur Pty Ltd | E: [email protected]   P: 61 3 8324 0344    M: 61 412 244 888
    #1164724
    MatthewKeath
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    This post sounds spammy to me…

    #1164725
    AngusMcKinnon
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    MatthewKeath, post: 190622 wrote:
    This post sounds spammy to me…

    You win :)

    #1164726
    DorothyM
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    affgar, post: 190571 wrote:
    I would definitely say in answer to your question go for WordPress.

    In answering the original question, I’d agree that WordPress is the choice from those three

    affgar, post: 190571 wrote:
    IWhat I could recommend is this …. take a look at Elegant Themes.

    While I agree Elegant Themes are beautiful, I think you need to be more specific. Some of Elegant’s themes are definitely NOT recommended, because they sacrifice speed for beauty. As I’m sure you know, site speed is a critical factor in Google’s algorithm these days. No point in having a gorgeous-looking site if it’s dumped from the SERPs.

    affgar, post: 190571 wrote:
    Elegant Themes with Woocommerce is a very sound combination.

    Sorry, don’t agree. If the OP is starting a website from scratch, then I wouldn’t recommend WooCommerce as a first choice (even though I’m a WooCommerce designer!). There are still issues with admin-ajax.php in WooCommerce which affects its load speeds – again, a potential killer when it comes to search engines. Combine it with a slow Elegant Theme and you’re staring guaranteed failure in the face!

    If the main business of a site is going to be ecommerce, I’d recommend going with dedicated shop software like Prestashop or Opencart instead.

    #1164727
    affgar
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    If the OP is wanting a cheap solution that will work …. my recommendations are very worthy.

    Elegant Themes do have some nice, fast themes. Obviously as with any website if you have heaps of products, lots of plugins etc … the site is going to slow down. Elegant Themes also have good customer service & are very cheap for what they provide. Yes there will be some issues as with any company.
    I am not an affiliate or have any financial connection to ET.

    There are many things that can be done to improve page speed on any website.

    I am a little confused DorothyM …
    You are referencing a rather slow site … with it’s fair share of issues?

    Woocommerce, WordPress … & everything connected is updating & changing all the time.

    My site … which is based on my recommendations proves your point quite wrong … I would think?
    My site is running fairly slow at the moment … I have only taken basic steps to try to improve the speed. My whole site is running on an SSL cert …. & I have more plugins than I need (I would not use any plugins if I were a coder). My site has issues & things I could change & improve of course.

    I am also getting better results in SEO that I could have ever hoped for … I am not aiming too high in the SEO competition though.

    Allowing any business to get online cheaply, but effectively is very good & should not be understated.
    Yes when people are making money & want to spend up on ‘great’ websites they can.

    Why lock yourself into a contract of financial burden if you don’t need to.
    Those who want that approach will appreciate what it can offer them.

    The beauty of WordPress, Woocommerce & ET is that someone can learn to do it themselves …. they can set things up & learn at their own pace & then they can even maintain their own site.
    There are people who just want a great Ecommerce site of the box … they will go a different way …

    I am curious DorothyM … what experience do you have with Elegant Themes & when?

    Thank you for contributing to the overall information provided & topic.

    #1164728
    DorothyM
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    affgar, post: 193700 wrote:
    If the OP is wanting a cheap solution that will work …. my recommendations are very worthy.

    Elegant Themes do have some nice, fast themes.

    They may well have. However several of them are slow. I did have a subscription at one point. I am not an expert but I always test my sites on Pingdom after changing themes and every time I tried an Elegant theme, (no change in plugins etc) there was a speed penalty. Which was a pity because I absolutely loved the way they looked and really wanted to use them.

    affgar, post: 193700 wrote:
    I am a little confused DorothyM …
    You are referencing a rather slow site … with it’s fair share of issues?

    If you mean the BellydanceOz site – yes, I’m aware of that. It’s a site I run for the belly dance community and it uses a directory software which was a bad buy. However the work to transfer to another directory software is just too great, and as it’s not a money-making site I’m not going to put in the effort. It just happens to be where I’ve got my most complete bio right now.

    affgar, post: 193700 wrote:
    Allowing any business to get online cheaply, but effectively is very good & should not be understated.
    Yes when people are making money & want to spend up on ‘great’ websites they can. Why lock yourself into a contract of financial burden if you don’t need to.

    I agree 100%. I don’t often buy WordPress themes or plugins and when I do, I prefer the ones which offer a “Lite” version so I can test before buying.

    Both Prestashop and Opencart are free software which you can learn yourself, just like WordPress. The difference is that they are designed from the ground up as online shops – they’re not blogging software with a shop tacked on. That means most of the functionality is built-in, you don’t need plugins which can slow things down.

    I have built two sites with WordPress/WooCommerce, and for those who need a website or blog with an associated shop, it’s a good solution. However if the main purpose of the site is a shop, I don’t think it’s the best option.

    #1164729
    Barry Moore
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    emaderam, post: 190564 wrote:
    How can I know that if these websites are really built with the claimed software? And how can I know if they have used any template for their sites or they have only used the standard features of software? Now I’m uncertain between WP and Joomla. What’s your recommendation? Tnx.
    You can use something like http://www.wpthemedetector.com to check out WP sites to see what they are using. There may be a similar site for Joomla, not sure.

    I would say a lot depends on the number of products (SKUs) you plan to sell and what strategy you plan to use to market them.

    If you plan to use a content marketing type strategy for a few SKUs then WordPress and WooCommerce would be a good combination for a blog/shop combo.

    If you are going to have a lot of SKUs and a more paid ads type of marketing plan then have a look at something like Shopify or BigCommerce.

    B

    #1164730
    help4bis.com
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    It is mentioned in previous posts, what is the true requirement.

    First some assumptions.
    – Small can get big.
    – OP wants a shop and some content like blogs etc.

    Any of the CMS most likely fits the bill, problem is performance, performance. Being opensource (no or little payments) these solutions are often used with those $ 9.99 pm type shared hosting services. That is where it will fall over.

    It is like setting up your counter, teller and displays in a tent instead of a building, it works all fine if the weather is good…. and can go pear shape very quickly.

    Another poster mentioned what is the REAL requirement… a shop…

    Well in my humble opinion… any of the CMS will not be sufficient in the long run, a shop is not some sort of plug-in. It should be a bit more sophisticated than that, it can be a really hassle and disruption to your business by moving your products, customers, orders etc to a more commercial platform. I done it a few times and I do not like the experience one single bit.

    There are several solutions for e-commerce solutions that allow easy back-end management suitable for any merchant.

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