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  • #1189775
    thenoduleshoco
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    • Total posts: 10
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    martin.firth, post: 222743, member: 46359 wrote:
    Your home page needs less BS, and more products. People will leave your website in under 2 seconds if they don’t see what they came for.

    Your website will sell five times more if your homepage is http://dev4.technoexponent.net/jollyany/shop/

    Your homepage should be 80% the page above, and 20% the sales spiels you currently use on the home page.

    In my opinion your website would be

    • Slider with picture of nodule shoe (2nd slide of homepage) with 2 sentences in the slider image explaining/selling the product
    • 20 or so products
    • Footer

    You probably have developed a lot of material for your website, and it feels good to get it online and visible. But your website needs to make your visitors happy, not you. Pare it down, and give focus to the products.

    What do you think man ?

    http://dev4.technoexponent.net/jollyany/

    #1189776
    AlexthePayPalguy
    Member
    • Total posts: 4
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    looks great to me..
    one thing i would recommend is rather than the standard PP integration, use express checkout through API, as it is a smoother customer experience, and responsive to mobile devices..
    actually, i’ll give you a quick call about this

    #1189777
    thenoduleshoco
    Member
    • Total posts: 10
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    http://www.thenoduleshoecompany.com.au

    What do you think everyone finally live and happy with my results and hey i have made a few sales already :)

    #1189778
    Dave Gillen – Former FS Concierge
    Keymaster
    • Total posts: 2,566
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    On your slider the buttons say: “Buy Now” and “Get Comfortable”. Buy Now is often the final button to buy something, and Get Comfortable is unclear.

    They both point to the same place (/shop), so they should say the same thing, and there’s no room for ambiguity, so I’d make them say “Browse Shoes” or “See the Shoes” or “Shop” or “Show Me The Shoes” or “Enter Shop” or similar.

    Nice job!

    Dave

    #1189779
    kangaroojosh
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    • Total posts: 64
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    awesome.. congrats on the store.
    the design, photos everything looks good..
    good luck.

    #1189780
    Gizmo
    Member
    • Total posts: 731
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    [USER=49676]@FS Forum Support[/USER]
    Agreed with what you said about buttons.
    But if he is trying to understand what website users prefer, then I can see the need to have different labelled buttons doing the same thing.

    Although Ideally the best way to do this is to randomly present the same heading to different users and analysing this. Doing it this way, while idea is complex and increase costs to implement.

    #1189781
    martin.firth
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    • Total posts: 259
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    Your home page is a trillion times better. If you haven’t already, spend a day getting into the nitty gritties of Google analytics. A lot of new business owners neglect this, and they shouldn’t. It has the answers to everything you’re wondering about your customers.

    In your slider, the buttons are misaligned for me (overlapping the text). This is fairly common with sliders, as they try to be responsive but also let you as the page builder position buttons absolutely, which causes mess ups.

    If you’re not seeing the issue, try zooming in or out to simulate a different screen size (hold Ctr/Cmd and the + key). One solution would be to embed the button into graphic itself, and make the whole slide clickable.

    I’m not sure about that big black bar, it really stands out in an ugly way. I’d be more inclined to try colours similar to the attached photo (very rough). These little design tweaks usually only cost a couple hundred bucks if you hire a designer like me to do it, but they make a world of difference. Good luck!

    #1189782
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136
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    Hi… just one query – the subscribe now and get a % off… does it need to be modal as soon as you open the site? Seems a bit too in your face psychologically… the first thing I did was click it off, because I hadn’t even seen what your site was for yet… and then I wondered how to get it back! :)

    #1189783
    JohnW
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    • Total posts: 2,642
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    The most frequent design problem I see is the expectation that everyone visits a website via its Home page.

    If people’s traffic reports show that all visits are via the Home page then it is a likely sign of an online communications disaster or a site with a very unusual objective.

    E-commerce sites in particular, should to be planned, structured and designed around the needs of new and repeat customers.

    Let me give an example of a site that sells infrequently purchased consumer products in the price range of hundreds of dollars each. A site summary:

    • Age: 6 years old
    • Size: 270 pages
    • Online marketing: Generic SE referrals (84% traffic)
    • New visits: 80% of all traffic

    The main types of site pages could be described as:

    • Home page
    • Product category pages
    • Brand category pages
    • Individual product pages

    Following is a breakdown of site traffic for the month of Nov 15:

    1. Home page

    Visits to Home: 15% of all visits
    Site entry at Home: 9% of all visits

    If they didn’t land on the site’s Home page, only 6% of visitors intentionally visited it.

    2. Product category pages

    Product category pages: 6
    Total site entries at a product category page: 30% of all visits

    Product category pages are usually the most important page type for delivering generic or paid search engine referrals.

    3. Brand category pages

    Brand category pages: 20
    Total site entries at a brand category page: 14% of all visits

    The importance of brand/manufacturer names in search terms no doubt varies dramatically with any product. Business owners should research this parameter and be also aware of brand/manufacturer advertising campaigns that may impact on online communications.

    4. Individual product pages

    Individual product pages: 230 (approx)
    10 top product pages: 10% of all visits
    220 other product pages: 32%

    In any market there will likely be a small number of brand leader products that will attract most brand search referrals. E-commerce sites need to know what these are and implement specific tactics to support them.

    Thenoduleshoco,
    It looks to me like you need to do a lot of work on designing/structuring your site around where visitors may enter it and the info they may need on each landing page. Some items that I’d want to see on every product category page:

    • Where are you? (At least country)
    • Is any shoe in a product category on special?
    • Free shipping (if true)
    • Moneyback guarantee
    • Credit cards accepted – display above the fold
    • What are shoes made of?
    • Are brand names relevant?
    • Why not split testimonials along product category lines?

    Good luck and regs,
    JohnW

    #1189784
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136
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    JohnW, post: 225191, member: 6375 wrote:
    The most frequent design problem I see is the expectation that everyone visits a website via its Home page.

    If people’s traffic reports show that all visits are via the Home page then it is a likely sign of an online communications disaster or a site with a very unusual objective.

    E-commerce sites in particular, should to be planned, structured and designed around the needs of new and repeat customers.

    Let me give an example of a site that sells infrequently purchased consumer products in the price range of hundreds of dollars each. A site summary:

    • Age: 6 years old
    • Size: 270 pages
    • Online marketing: Generic SE referrals (84% traffic)
    • New visits: 80% of all traffic

    The main types of site pages could be described as:

    • Home page
    • Product category pages
    • Brand category pages
    • Individual product pages

    Following is a breakdown of site traffic for the month of Nov 15:

    1. Home page

    Visits to Home: 15% of all visits
    Site entry at Home: 9% of all visits

    If they didn’t land on the site’s Home page, only 6% of visitors intentionally visited it.

    2. Product category pages

    Product category pages: 6
    Total site entries at a product category page: 30% of all visits

    Product category pages are usually the most important page type for delivering generic or paid search engine referrals.

    3. Brand category pages

    Brand category pages: 20
    Total site entries at a brand category page: 14% of all visits

    The importance of brand/manufacturer names in search terms no doubt varies dramatically with any product. Business owners should research this parameter and be also aware of brand/manufacturer advertising campaigns that may impact on online communications.

    4. Individual product pages

    Individual product pages: 230 (approx)
    10 top product pages: 10% of all visits
    220 other product pages: 32%

    In any market there will likely be a small number of brand leader products that will attract most brand search referrals. E-commerce sites need to know what these are and implement specific tactics to support them.

    Thenoduleshoco,
    It looks to me like you need to do a lot of work on designing/structuring your site around where visitors may enter it and the info they may need on each landing page. Some items that I’d want to see on every product category page:

    • Where are you? (At least country)
    • Is any shoe in a product category on special?
    • Free shipping (if true)
    • Moneyback guarantee
    • Credit cards accepted – display above the fold
    • What are shoes made of?
    • Are brand names relevant?
    • Why not split testimonials along product category lines?

    Good luck and regs,
    JohnW

    Love your posts, John. They’re always so informative, and inpire many questions.

    The following questions spring to mind when I just read your message… your advice is very strong. Where does the data come from that you use to make it?

    Not asking you to provide the data, but rather simply explain some information around it: how many data points you have to provide your recommendations. Perhaps you could do this on your website for the curious-minded such as myself so you don’t have to repeat yourself. This will give your recommendations more credability.

    (The reason is that it’s hard to know where to place the advice you give. If it’s the result of a few websites results, or if it’s the result of 1000’s of sites results – what were the results, etc.)

    Many Thanks

    #1189785
    JohnW
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,642
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    getcontented.com.au, post: 225194, member: 72814 wrote:
    Love your posts, John. They’re always so informative, and inpire many questions.

    The following questions spring to mind when I just read your message… your advice is very strong. Where does the data come from that you use to make it?…
    Many Thanks
    Hi Julian,
    The example above uses Google Analytics stats from one website.

    The general trends are true based on my 20 years experience in observing all manner of large and small websites. (My current domain name can be tracked in the Wayback machine to as early as 1999.)

    There must have been hundreds of sites I’ve checked, audited and/or provided online marketing support to over this time.

    An advantage of being in the game so long is that I’ve seen info from all those years when we had much more detailed data and from many now defunct measurement tools about search terms and SE traffic than we get now from Google.

    The picture I paint of traffic to websites should come as no surprise to anyone who knows search engines, marketing principles, how people search and use a website and who have seen a SE optimised website. I.e. One that targets the widest range of relevant searchers and the search methods they use as they progress through the purchasing process.

    IMHO, people looking to increase generic SE referrals to their site should forget “frequently used keywords”. To me, that is a metric devised by Google to generate it more revenue per click on an Adword ad. It seems to have worked well as I see the average cost per click is now running around $2 when it started life at only $0.10. Not a bad increase for G since 2002!

    PS to the above…
    The same client ref’ed above has another website promoting the same products but with different page content. That one relies on $2,000 per month of G Adwords and attracts less than half the traffic of the generic SE site.

    At one point the Adwords site’s traffic was doubled for the same Adwords budget by creating search topic relevant landing pages and more relevant ads.

    Business owners and web designers/developers need to learn how critical is the process of targeting website visitors and providing the info they want on specific internal site pages.

    Adwords marketing still needs the same groups of product category and brand name landing pages for its different ads to accommodate how people search.

    PPS: Julian,
    I don’t publish stuff on my website. It’s only a single page with my contact details on it. As a one person business, I find my time is occupied with consulting support to web designers/developers and online marketing/SEO training for small business owners. Please send me a PM if you want a Skype chat to answer your questions in more detail.
    best regs,
    JohnW

    #1189786
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136
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    JohnW, post: 225200, member: 6375 wrote:
    Hi Julian,
    The example above uses Google Analytics stats from one website.

    The general trends are true based on my 20 years experience in observing all manner of large and small websites. (My current domain name can be tracked in the Wayback machine to as early as 1999.)

    There must have been hundreds of sites I’ve checked, audited and/or provided online marketing support to over this time.

    An advantage of being in the game so long is that I’ve seen info from all those years when we had much more detailed data and from many now defunct measurement tools about search terms and SE traffic than we get now from Google.

    The picture I paint of traffic to websites should come as no surprise to anyone who knows search engines, marketing principles, how people search and use a website and who have seen a SE optimised website. I.e. One that targets the widest range of relevant searchers and the search methods they use as they progress through the purchasing process.

    IMHO, people looking to increase generic SE referrals to their site should forget “frequently used keywords”. To me, that is a metric devised by Google to generate it more revenue per click on an Adword ad. It seems to have worked well as I see the average cost per click is now running around $2 when it started life at only $0.10. Not a bad increase for G since 2002!

    PS to the above…
    The same client ref’ed above has another website promoting the same products but with different page content. That one relies on $2,000 per month of G Adwords and attracts less than half the traffic of the generic SE site.

    At one point the Adwords site’s traffic was doubled for the same Adwords budget by creating search topic relevant landing pages and more relevant ads.

    Business owners and web designers/developers need to learn how critical is the process of targeting website visitors and providing the info they want on specific internal site pages.

    Adwords marketing still needs the same groups of product category and brand name landing pages for its different ads to accommodate how people search.

    PPS: Julian,
    I don’t publish stuff on my website. It’s only a single page with my contact details on it. As a one person business, I find my time is occupied with consulting support to web designers/developers and online marketing/SEO training for small business owners. Please send me a PM if you want a Skype chat to answer your questions in more detail.
    best regs,
    JohnW

    Agreed! I wasn’t doubting the truth of what you were saying. I was simply explaining the questions that arise in the mind of someone who *doesn’t* understand that you have a huge amount of experience in this stuff.

    What’s most interesting to me, I guess, is the quality of pages for specific aims… maximizing the pages that are helping to achieve specific targets that website owners set up, and experimenting with varied “nets”. Without targets, sheer numbers means little. (For example, while a page about “Five Seconds of Summer” on a shoe sales site might bring in a large amount of traffic, this might not be very beneficial to people wanting to buy shoes, and so doesn’t do the shoe sales site much good.)

    There’s no doubt in my mind that having many pages with a lot of information is better for search engine optimisation. It always has been. It makes complete sense, because by having more pages with more content your website is a bigger surface area, and a bigger percentage of the total number of pages on the internet. This is, effectively, using content about products or services to drive marketing by widening one’s sales funnel.

    Like you say, web designers and business owners usually focus not on what their core aims are, but rather on whether a site looks nice, uses the latest “new fangled” technological gizmos, or has the right layout… rather than the basics, which are the things that bring in customers and money – building keyword-focussed content, putting each piece of separate info on a separate semantic externally accessible URL: pages to educate, enlighten or attract the attention of customers with the aim of funneling them into sales – to maximize the effectiveness of keyword searches – to whatever degree the customer has interest. To encourage the ability to avail the further spread of that information by visitors, (“social network” / link- capable / encouraging) and to connect the business with as much of the web (to do with the content relating to the subject matter of that business) as is possible.

    As to your own site, a website needn’t *only* be about attracting customers, or making sales. It can be a reference work for clients (prospective or existing) – to save you rewriting the same content again and again, and to build authority by allowing you to back up your advice with facts and figures. Whatever works well for you, though… at the end of the day :)

    Thanks

    #1189787
    JohnW
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,642
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    Hi Julian,
    Sorry for misunderstanding your comments and therefore waffling on about my experience…

    To add to your next comments and this is only opinion offered to help our thread starter…

    Displaying your info in situations where you don’t/can’t target your audience or in a situation where they are not interested in your info is a waste of time and resources, IMHO.

    I believe we can see this in many different surveys and studies:

    • web eye tracking studies
    • the difference in click through rates of SE vs. social media ads
    • the difficulty in assessing ROI of social media
    • the downloads of ad blocking software
    • online ad blindness studies
    • and more…

    I’m reminded of one client who spent $500 testing Facebook ads. The budget was spent in a week and a lot of people clicked the ads but the entire campaign had a 100% bounce rate on his website and that bounce was so fast that it registered as “0” time on site for the lot.

    Rule 1 of advertising: Information must be relevant to the target audience.

    That is one of the reasoins why site owners need to consider the different info requirements of potential clients vs existing clients.

    There is a bunch of info that potential clients need that existing clients already know.

    Potential clients are most likely to find sites in SEs. They need to know where you are, who you are, can they trust you, do you have the products they want, how do they pay, what are your returns policies, what are your delivery costs and mechanisms, etc.

    Repeat clients already know most of what a new client needs to know.

    Repeat clients may respond better to email programs and social media programs. Repeat customers are likely to respond to incentives, discounts and loyalty programs. If you intend to go into these types of programs, you will need pages on your site to support them. Where are you going to put them? It seems to me there is no advantage to a new site featuring these on its Home page as it doesn’t have existing clients.

    A new e-commerce site may use its Home page to provide answers that new potential clients want.

    A new e-comm site should expect its audience targeting needs to change with time and that should mean overhauls of its Home page and other internal pages will be required. With time, it may make sense to change its Home page targeting from new clients to existing client’s info needs and that could mean featuring discounts and loyalty programs on Home.

    I’m drawing a conclusion from your post that may be wrong but it sounds like you are treating the SE value of web pages as separate and unrelated entities. I believe they are not.

    If we Google search for: womens shoes

    We find that every top 10 result is a product category page from a very large retail website. There will be many more “womens shoes” pages on these sites than on our thread starter’s entire site. She has no hope of competing in the SEs for this search term with these mega sites.

    SEO starts with identifying where a new site can hope to compete in search results to attract new clients.

    A lesson that small business e-comm owners need to take on board is that they are incapable of servicing the demand of the Internet.

    If our poster was to instantly rank #1 for “womens shoes”,

    • her web server could collapse under the demand,
    • she would be hit with a demand she could not supply,
    • she would then be hit with an unbelievable volume of complaint emails and
    • requests to cancel orders and reverse credit card charges.

    The admin demand could put her out of business.

    Now try a Google search for: womens shoes Newcastle

    There is not a single domain with a page in this top 10 result as there was for the search for “womens shoes”.

    I’m not saying the thread poster should target “womens shoes”, I’m just using this as an example of the SEO process and the importance of defining target client relevant search terms.

    Small business e-com can compete with the big online stores but they need to be clever about it. Avoid their competitor’s strengths then identify and maximise their own.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1189788
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136
    Up
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    JohnW, post: 225220, member: 6375 wrote:
    Hi Julian,
    Sorry for misunderstanding your comments and therefore waffling on about my experience…

    To add to your next comments and this is only opinion offered to help our thread starter…

    Displaying your info in situations where you don’t/can’t target your audience or in a situation where they are not interested in your info is a waste of time and resources, IMHO.

    I believe we can see this in many different surveys and studies:

    • web eye tracking studies
    • the difference in click through rates of SE vs. social media ads
    • the difficulty in assessing ROI of social media
    • the downloads of ad blocking software
    • online ad blindness studies
    • and more…

    I’m reminded of one client who spent $500 testing Facebook ads. The budget was spent in a week and a lot of people clicked the ads but the entire campaign had a 100% bounce rate on his website and that bounce was so fast that it registered as “0” time on site for the lot.

    Rule 1 of advertising: Information must be relevant to the target audience.

    That is one of the reasoins why site owners need to consider the different info requirements of potential clients vs existing clients.

    There is a bunch of info that potential clients need that existing clients already know.

    Potential clients are most likely to find sites in SEs. They need to know where you are, who you are, can they trust you, do you have the products they want, how do they pay, what are your returns policies, what are your delivery costs and mechanisms, etc.

    Repeat clients already know most of what a new client needs to know.

    Repeat clients may respond better to email programs and social media programs. Repeat customers are likely to respond to incentives, discounts and loyalty programs. If you intend to go into these types of programs, you will need pages on your site to support them. Where are you going to put them? It seems to me there is no advantage to a new site featuring these on its Home page as it doesn’t have existing clients.

    A new e-commerce site may use its Home page to provide answers that new potential clients want.

    A new e-comm site should expect its audience targeting needs to change with time and that should mean overhauls of its Home page and other internal pages will be required. With time, it may make sense to change its Home page targeting from new clients to existing client’s info needs and that could mean featuring discounts and loyalty programs on Home.

    I’m drawing a conclusion from your post that may be wrong but it sounds like you are treating the SE value of web pages as separate and unrelated entities. I believe they are not.

    If we Google search for: womens shoes

    We find that every top 10 result is a product category page from a very large retail website. There will be many more “womens shoes” pages on these sites than on our thread starter’s entire site. She has no hope of competing in the SEs for this search term with these mega sites.

    SEO starts with identifying where a new site can hope to compete in search results to attract new clients.

    A lesson that small business e-comm owners need to take on board is that they are incapable of servicing the demand of the Internet.

    If our poster was to instantly rank #1 for “womens shoes”,

    • her web server could collapse under the demand,
    • she would be hit with a demand she could not supply,
    • she would then be hit with an unbelievable volume of complaint emails and
    • requests to cancel orders and reverse credit card charges.

    The admin demand could put her out of business.

    Now try a Google search for: womens shoes Newcastle

    There is not a single domain with a page in this top 10 result as there was for the search for “womens shoes”.

    I’m not saying the thread poster should target “womens shoes”, I’m just using this as an example of the SEO process and the importance of defining target client relevant search terms.

    Small business e-com can compete with the big online stores but they need to be clever about it. Avoid their competitor’s strengths then identify and maximise their own.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    John,

    Excellent comments, as always. I agree wholeheartedly with all of it.

    No apologies needed. Should be very helpful to everyone :)

    I really do think you should write some of this down on a website, ebook or something though. Would make a good read.

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