Home – New Forums Tech talk Google drops local search 7 pack to a 3 pack

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  • #1186813
    Snakeman
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    John in relative terms “yes”. In absolute (numerical) terms “no”.
    Hope this helps give you my perspective.
    Of course I reserve a right to change my mind, if and when the percentage of people who block ads goes up.
    All the best

    #1186815
    JohnW
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    Snakeman, post: 219393, member: 14458 wrote:
    Of course I reserve a right to change my mind, if and when the percentage of people who block ads goes up.
    All the bestHi Snakeman,
    I don’t know where it will go either but I’m watching the area closely.

    It seems consumers are very adverse to ads occupying their screen space.

    There seems to be a tacit war on between Google and the blocker software folk. I gather the blockers do something that G then counters, and around we go again etc. I read that a blocker company has developed its own browser…

    The small screen (mobile phone) may open a new war front.

    Then there is Apple…

    I came across this recent Aust. article on the subject…

    10 Aug 15, Financial Review:

    Ad-blocking warning as take-up soars
    “The dramatic take-up of ad-blocking software by Australian online users is quickly approaching 4 million, outnumbering Twitter’s base in Australia and triggering warnings of an imminent shake out for advertisers and digital media companies.”

    “Apple’s iOS9 Safari web browser update in September will also include an ad-blocking option which British Vogue’s digital creative solutions manager Emma Gearyhas described as the “most disruptive update yet“‘

    Seems ad blocking software installs are really rocking in Aust. Since we started this chat it seems they have already doubled to “twice virtually no one” in Aus. ;)

    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1186816
    Stephen Forde
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    Ad blocking is great for organic!

    That City Move case is interesting. Bit of a blue print for taking down a competitor, not that I condone that, but plenty of business owners would do that.

    Funnily enough I saw a bad review on a clients g+ recently. After Googling I found the same bad review posted n whirlpool and after checkingit again it’s a different user name…So does that mean ACCC will start writing a cheque? :)

    #1186817
    Snakeman
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    Thanks as always JohnW – you definitely have your finger on the pulse.
    All the best

    #1186818
    JohnW
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    Aidan, post: 219046, member: 2298 wrote:
    Hey John,

    Did you also notice that in the US those 3-pack listings are starting to morph into paid placements? A search for ‘plumbers san francisco’ is bringing them up for me. I think Google is becoming more and more a pay to play medium.
    Hi Aidan,
    I believe there may be a paid G trial underway.

    We’ve also seen the total failures of previous G trials of paid USA Business Listings in the past.

    Now we’ve got G with huge problems in gaining ad revenue from mobile phone ads because so many are delivered by social media sites and apps. Add to that its problems with mobile hardware and software and it gets even more interesting.

    What would happens if Apple developed its own search engine for its mobile users and locked out Google?

    At the end of the 90s, no one could see Alta Vista being toppled!

    Would I be too provocative to suggest we could be seeing the first signs of G’s demise?

    “May you live in interesting times”.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1186819
    Snakeman
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    John (and others),
    Yes I agree things can change very fast in internet land, (e.g. is Alta Vista still in business?) but Google appears way stronger at the present time.
    Having said that I am astounded that none of the other big guns have really given search a run for its money.
    One can only assume that sooner or later Facebook, Apple and the like will do their own search and try hard at it, if only for the ad revenue.
    But I should add that I read somewhere that search was treated as a loss making exercise, which I found hard to believe.
    All the best

    #1186820
    bb1
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    JohnW, post: 220313, member: 6375 wrote:
    Would I be too provocative to suggest we could be seeing the first signs of G’s demise?

    JohnW, that is definitely not a provocative statement, in fact looking back over history, I would say it WILL happen. If you take google as an example it is really just another tool or form of technology, and like a lot of other things in this world an even better way will come along, and instead of me saying to my children “back when I was your age we had the yellow pages or the encyclopedia Britanica””, they will be saying to their children back in our day we had “”google””, and their children will look back with a blank stare and think what are you waffling about.

    And an even more provocative statement from me, just like a heap of other professions, which have disappeared over the years, one day people will be asking what did an SEO expert do, as they are no longer needed. But just like all the other professions, SEO’s will morph into TNP’s, and continue on but doing something different.

    #1186821
    JohnW
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    Snakeman, post: 220315, member: 14458 wrote:
    John (and others),
    Yes I agree things can change very fast in internet land, (e.g. is Alta Vista still in business?) but Google appears way stronger at the present time.
    Having said that I am astounded that none of the other big guns have really given search a run for its money.
    One can only assume that sooner or later Facebook, Apple and the like will do their own search and try hard at it, if only for the ad revenue.
    But I should add that I read somewhere that search was treated as a loss making exercise, which I found hard to believe.
    All the best
    Hi Snakeman,
    Alta Vista started life in 1997. I believe it got sold off several times after Google dominated. It ended up with Yahoo and was shut down in 2013. That’s an 18 year life. Google is only up to 15 years so far…

    I don’t understand the piece you read about “search was treated as a loss making exercise”. Since its short forray into mobile phone ownership has ceased, it will be back to 90+% of revenue from online ads.

    16 billion searches per month are the drivers of its ad revenue.

    • More searches = more ad revenue.
    • No searching = no ad revenue.

    Feb 14: Apple, Google, Microsoft: Where does the money come from?
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1186822
    JohnW
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    bb1, post: 220322, member: 53375 wrote:
    JohnW, that is definitely not a provocative statement, in fact looking back over history, I would say it WILL happen. If you take google as an example it is really just another tool or form of technology, and like a lot of other things in this world an even better way will come along, and instead of me saying to my children “back when I was your age we had the yellow pages or the encyclopedia Britanica””, they will be saying to their children back in our day we had “”google””, and their children will look back with a blank stare and think what are you waffling about.

    And an even more provocative statement from me, just like a heap of other professions, which have disappeared over the years, one day people will be asking what did an SEO expert do, as they are no longer needed. But just like all the other professions, SEO’s will morph into TNP’s, and continue on but doing something different.
    Hi Bert,
    It’s Father’s Day. How come you’re posting on FS?

    IMHO, there is an interesting war emerging over the online ad market. Last year it was reported that Google’s share of the $82 billion online market was $59 billion.

    The battle lines are drawn around:

    • Entertainment
    • Communications
    • Information retrieval
    • Functionality

    Entertainment includes the likes of Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube

    Communications includes Twitter, Skype and many aps

    Information retrieval – this is currently Google and daylight

    Functionality is in its early days. This is the “Internet of things” (IOT) and “beaconing, etc. (I’m not even going to try to guess where the IOT may go.)

    Most of the online ad dollar is directed at consumers.

    Most of the big budget, worldwide consumer companies can’t use “information retrieval” – no one’s interested to search for their products. The likes of Coke and McDonalds have never been able to use Google to deliver their essentially image driven marketing messages. Social media has given them various channels.

    Search is the world of bricks and mortar businesses, smaller and local businesses, online only businesses and B2B.

    Then along came smartphones in 2007…

    Mobile is a huge problem for G. There are now more mobile searches than desktop. These searches are looking for info that is largely very different to desktop searchers. The bulk of the web is not smartphone-friendly (fast) and often does not provide the info that smartphone users want.

    Many smartphone searchers are now in a technical environment where the phone supplier (i.e. Apple) could dictate the ads supplied when users seek info.

    I would not be surprised to see a new world order emerge within 5 years where:

    • Facebook and YouTube owns the entertainment user world
    • Google owns the desktop search and some mobile search ad market
    • Apple becomes a major player in the mobile search ad market

    PS I hope SEO dies as a term. I’ve always preferred Internet marketing consultant.

    PPS. What’s the acronym TNP? I looked it up and found one definition was “The New Pornographers”.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1186823
    bb1
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    JohnW, post: 220335, member: 6375 wrote:
    Hi Bert,
    It’s Father’s Day. How come you’re posting on FS?

    LOL, I was waiting for the kids to get up to make me breakie in bed, I got the breakfast but not in bed, oh well that’s life.

    JohnW, post: 220335, member: 6375 wrote:
    PPS. What’s the acronym TNP? I looked it up and found one definition was “The New Pornographers”.

    Oops I should have searched before I made up a brand new acronym… TNP – The Next Profession. Made it up to indicate when online search is dead and all SEO’s are looking for their next adventure.

    #1186824
    Aidan
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    The death of online search? You mean a time when people won’t look for stuff online?

    I can’t see it myself, at least not anytime soon but these days most digital marketers are across a number of disciplines – organic, paid advertising, design, conversion optimisation, market research, outreach, social engagement… and more…

    If search was to die they’d most likely still be in business on the other aspects :)

    #1186825
    bb1
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    Aidan, post: 220349, member: 2298 wrote:
    The death of online search? You mean a time when people won’t look for stuff online?

    :)
    No I didn’t say that people wont look for online stuff, but there will be new and better ways of doing it.
    Remember there was a time when you had to hand code a bootstrap loader into a computer, or paper tapes, etc. Back then people said there is no other way to do it. Who hand codes 1’s and 0’s into a computer anymore.

    #1186826
    JohnW
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    Google intends to scrape as many answers as it can from our websites so people don’t need to click through to them.

    Mar 15: Optimising Google’s Knowledge Graph – #SMX Munich
    “Currently, Google returns Knowledge Cards for 19% of the questions that are being asked. Stonetemple did an impressive case study using a dataset of 850.000 questions: Google Provides Rich Answer Results to 19% of Queries Used in Our Test”

    IMHO, another nail in the coffin for SEOs who charge based on frequently used keywords.

    Businesses will start to realise that more meaningful results will be needed than simple ranking parameters.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1186827
    mypresences
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    I am also watching to see what google do in the paid local ads area .. they are also going as far as building their own marketplace in some markets:
    http://blumenthals.com/blog/2015/07/29/google-testing-home-services-marketplace-snak-paks/

    If they go fully pay to play then I would home something comes along to shake things up a bit .. it sounds like apple will be doing something big in this area so that might help.

    I can also see the emergence of the virtual assistant crowd with Siri, google now, cortana and facebook m posing a big threat to their ads revenue as they mature as less and less people need to go to an archaic search engine and type their query and choose a result.

    Could they be making a dash for cash while they still can?

    Will be interesting to see how they plan to monetise this change with less and less UI and more tasks being handled purely by voice. Maybe their future revenue will be more about actions rather than impressions.

    #1186828
    bb1
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    mypresences, post: 223045, member: 43660 wrote:
    I

    I can also see the emergence of the virtual assistant crowd with Siri, google now, cortana and facebook m posing a big threat to their ads revenue as they mature as less and less people need to go to an archaic search engine and type their query and choose a result.

    .

    Just out of interest are Siri and Co. really posing a threat, I am hearing that they are buggy, give dodgy results and still need you to look at the screens. Just wondering if people have really taken to them,

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