Home – New Forums Starting your journey How can I avoid the perils of part-timing?

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  • #968654
    Plaintext Copywriting
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    Hi everyone,

    I’ve been getting work through freelancing sites for a few months, and I’m now at a stage where I want to start establishing my copywriting business in the ‘real world’. The trouble is, I’m still working full time and can’t afford to leave that security just yet.

    I’m worried that potential clients will be deterred by the fact that I’m not a full-time freelancer. Also, because I’m stuck in my employer’s office from 9-5 every day, I can’t attend meetings with potential clients. Meetings aren’t necessary for me but I know some clients need that face-to-face contact for peace of mind.

    I’m hiding my freelance work from my employer, and also feel I need to hide my wage slave job from my potential clients.

    Has anyone else been in this situation? I’d love to hear any tips for this transition period. It’s starting to feel like an insurmountable impediment.

    Thanks,
    Ren

    #1034432
    Melinda B
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    Work online. You don’t need to meet your customers in person so it won’t matter what hours you work. They’ll never know that you’re part time and have a normal job unless you tell them.

    If you’re after some resources, have a look at these sites:

    http://menwithpens.ca/

    http://www.procopytips.com/

    http://www.copyblogger.com/

    http://www.directcreative.com/copywriter-information-center.html

    #1034433
    HRnet
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    Hey there, I was in the same situation prior to starting http://www.hrnet.com.au. Apart from a little work ‘on the side’ I was totally up front with my employer. Although the same industry, I was not competing with them at all and was fortunate enough to negotiate a part time arrangement, where I worked on my ‘salaried’ job for 3 days per week and started my business on the remaining two.

    It did require constant personal reminding that when I was working for them, I needed to stay away from my own business (which I did)…but for a three month period prior to resignation, they were happy as they had someone in the role for a transitional period, and I had some income whilst starting my now successful venture.

    It’s of course on a case by case basis – but could it work for you?
    Stu

    #1034434
    Plaintext Copywriting
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    Thanks Melinda and Stu; I enjoy hearing how others manage the move into working for themselves.

    Online work is ideal (preferable, in fact) for me, but it seems that some clients are still uncomfortable engaging the services of someone they haven’t at least had a phone conversation with.

    Stu, I think when I feel more financially ready I’ll do as you did. While I know my employer couldn’t reduce my role to part time on an ongoing basis, you’ve made me realise that they would actually benefit from a lengthy handover as I transitioned out of the role.

    Thanks again for the suggestions.

    Ren

    #1034435
    Melinda B
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    Ratkins, post: 41371 wrote:
    Online work is ideal (preferable, in fact) for me, but it seems that some clients are still uncomfortable engaging the services of someone they haven’t at least had a phone conversation with.

    Yup, I know. That Men with Pens link that I posted – they work totally online. James doesn’t use the phone at all. I’m pretty sure he’d be happy to answer questions about how he does it – if you do email him tell him that Melinda suggested it. :-)

    #1034436
    Plaintext Copywriting
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    I love the idea of not using the phone! Thanks again, I’m going to look into this a bit more.

    #1034437
    Hugh Thyer
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    From one who’s been there…

    – Use webmail to reply to emails during the day
    – Sit in your car and make phone calls
    – Deal with clients mainly with email
    – Don’t tell clients you work, but NEVER DENY IT

    These things got me through.

    And one thing I found useful was to use work time for work, and outside hours for my business. It’s hard to mix them up too much. Sure, there’s some crossover but keep one as separate from the other as possible.

    If you aren’t abusing your employer then you’re not doing anything wrong by them.

    #1034438
    Plaintext Copywriting
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    Thanks for sharing your own experiences and tips, Hugh. It’s always good to be reminded that people actually make it through this tricky transition period, and I’m feeling more confident now that I can juggle the two for a while.

    I’m far too busy at work to be tempted to attend to my own business, so at least that’s not going to be a problem!

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