Home – New Forums Wellbeing & balance How did you find your passion?

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #994301
    tahliamaynard
    Member
    • Total posts: 18
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi there,

    I am putting together a bit of a guide to helping people find their passion for my personal blog. So many people struggle to answer the question: “What are you passionate about?”. I was one of these people not so long ago.

    Before I get too deep into providing this advice to my readers, I’d love to hear if anyone heard any specific advice or experience anything moving that led them to find their ‘passion’ so to speak. For example; I was once asked ‘If you won the lottery and were set for life what would you spend your days doing?”.

    I also think the word ‘passion’ is used too much and is getting a little cringe-worthy, does anyone have another word they like to refer to it as?

    Thanks a bunch!

    #1195954
    writeNOISE
    Member
    • Total posts: 68
    Up
    0
    ::

    I’ve been struggling with that question myself lately – feeling that my passions were disconnected from what I do in my business. (And I’ve also been asking myself: “is there anything necessarily wrong with that?) I dug up some notes from a course I did 12 years ago via Passion Maps. I was quite shocked to realise that the things I’d connected with back then are the main things I’m still passionate about now. Thing is, to answer that question of what I would do if money were no object … they’re either idealistic “let’s change the world at the coal-face” volunteer/humanitarian/activist things, or they’re things I don’t want to do for a living (like spiritual practices or playing with crystals and aromatherapy).

    Coincidentally, I’m currently brainstorming ways to integrate more of my passions into my work, like the fairly obvious “seeking out clients with similar values/interests to mine”.

    I agree ‘passion’ is pretty hackneyed these days. You could use ‘purpose’, ‘calling’, ‘meaning’.

    I hope some of that helps. Good luck with your venture!

    Virginia

    #1195955
    JamesR
    Member
    • Total posts: 10
    Up
    0
    ::

    For me, the passion for owning/running my own business comes from a few sources:

    • family time — I have a young family, and a big desire to be there for them during this time while they’re growing up. Being in the office working for a boss 9-5 doesnt offer me that flexibility, as I do have running my own business.
    • office politics – I hate office politics. Running my own business means I have more control over who I choose to do business with.
    • earning potential – my earning potential was pretty much capped whilst in the office environment. Whilst working for myself I have the uncapped potential !
    • building a future for my kids – I hope to build a business that I can leave for my kids (should they choose to follow in my footsteps). Its a very uncertain world out there, and in my mind, having a business to step into for my children is an excellent Plan B !
    #1195956
    DamienDeveloper
    Member
    • Total posts: 9
    Up
    0
    ::

    The dictionary definition of ‘success’ is the accomplishment of an aim or purpose, which would be different for everyone. My personal definition of success is “To have the greatest amount of control and influence over my life that is possible, while growing my net worth and maintaining a relevant skillset at all times.”*

    *Reserve the right to change this definition at any time.

    #1195957
    Kelly Exeter FS Editor
    Member
    • Total posts: 241
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hey Tahlia – I wrote about this in my book Practical Perfection – here’s the relevant excerpt – feel free to use whatever you like (with appropriate credit) :)

    Eight ways to identify your Passions

    #1: Open your eyes

    I can’t find anyone who explains this better than Mark Manson. So please excuse the language and listen to what he says to the hundreds of people who have asked him for help on this topic:

    “You already found your passion, you’re just ignoring it. Seriously, you’re awake 16 hours a day, what the fuck do you do with your time? You’re doing something, obviously. You’re talking about something. There’s some topic or activity or idea that dominates a significant amount of your free time, your conversations, your web browsing, and it dominates them without you consciously pursuing it or looking for it.

    It’s right there in front of you, you’re just avoiding it. For whatever reason, you’re avoiding it.”6

    #2: Understand yourself better

    Another way to find out what your Passions might be is to try some personality typing. Some people love this stuff, and some people hate it. Personally I’m in the ‘love’ camp because it helped me understand and better accept certain aspects of my personality.

    For years I tried to overcome my quietness, inflexibility around daily routines, and the fact that having to follow any kind of instructions makes my brain want to explode. I thought all these things made me a bad person and were flaws that needed to be overcome.

    Then I did some personality typing, and discovered those traits are hardwired into me.

    After that I became a lot more self-accepting, and learned to work with my strengths instead of getting angry at myself for being too ‘weak’ to properly address my perceived ‘flaws’.

    There are a lot of ways to determine your personality type. Here are four of the more popular tests, and while they can be expensive you can often find free versions on the Internet:

    · StrengthsFinder 2.0

    · DiSC Profile®

    · Sally Hogshead’s Fascination Advantage Assessment

    · Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI®)

    My personal favourite is the MBTI. It taught me that my particular personality type (INFJ) is full of contradictions. The Introvert (I) in me needs to be alone to recharge, but the Feeler (F) side of me loves deep and intense connections with people. And while the Intuitive (N) side of me loves taking a big picture view of things and doesn’t like getting bogged down in details and processes, the Judger (J) in me needs to be highly organised. No wonder I feel at odds with myself so often!

    INFJs are also hard-core idealists and have a need to help the world. Most specifically, INFJs love helping people bring order to their lives.

    Finding out all this (and more) gave me an intimate understanding of what drives me and makes me happy. It also gave me huge clues as to where my Passions lay, and how I could make room for those Passions in my life without depleting my energy levels.

    For example, as much as I love feeling connected to people, in-person human interaction drains me very quickly. So my capacity for helping people that way is limited. But helping people through books and blog posts, podcasting and reaching out on social media is a different story. I have almost unlimited energy for that so that’s what I tend to stick to.

    Want some similar insights into your personality type? In 2013 I collaborated with Carly Toomey from Type-Coach (type-coach.com) on a series of blog posts identifying what makes each personality type particularly ‘buzzy’, complete with case studies of each type. You can check out that series of blog posts by visiting this page on my website: kellyexeter.com.au/personality.

    #3: Ask yourself, ‘What am I willing to experience a lot of discomfort for?’

    Are you prepared to stand in line for hours to get the latest Apple device before everyone else? Will you get up at 5am every day for six months to train for an Ironman triathlon? Do you think nothing of spending eight hours researching, writing and editing a single blog post before hitting ‘publish’?

    These are all clues. But what they suggest about you isn’t always what you think. For example:

    · The girl who lines up for the first crack at the latest iPhone isn’t necessarily passionate about Apple products. She’s probably more passionate about being an early adopter and staying ‘ahead of the curve’.

    · The guy training for the Ironman triathlon is probably more passionate about pushing physical boundaries than he is about triathlon itself.

    · The blogger who spends eight hours on a single post could be more passionate about the ideas they’re trying to communicate than the actual writing.

    #4: Ask yourself, ‘What am I curious about?’

    Here’s Elizabeth Gilbert (author of Eat, Pray, Love). In her wonderful creative manifesto, Big Magic, she urges us to follow our curiosity and see where it leads us. The beauty of curiosity is that it:

    “… only ever asks one simple question: “Is there anything you’re interested in?” Anything? Even a tiny bit? No matter how mundane or small? The answer need not set your life on fire, or make you quit your job, or force you to change your religion, or send you into a fugue state; it just has to capture your attention for a moment. But in that moment, if you can pause and identify even one tiny speck of interest in something, then curiosity will ask you to turn your head a quarter of an inch and look at the thing a wee bit closer. Do it. It’s a clue. It might seem like nothing, but it’s a clue. Follow that clue. Trust it. See where curiosity will lead you next. Then follow the next clue, and the next, and the next. Remember, it doesn’t have to be a voice in the desert; it’s just a harmless little scavenger hunt. Following that scavenger hunt of curiosity can lead you to amazing, unexpected places.”7

    For a lot of people this focus on ‘curiosity’ really hits the mark as it removes the sense of desperation that tends to go with finding your Passions.

    #5: Ask yourself, ‘What am I good at?’

    Oliver Emberton believes passion comes from success. He says:

    “All of our emotions exist for good reason. We feel hunger to ensure we don’t starve. We feel full to ensure we don’t burst. And we feel passion to ensure we concentrate our efforts on things that reward us the most.

    Imagine you start a dance class. You find it easy. You realise you’re getting better than others, and fast. That rising excitement you feel is your passion, and that passion makes you come back for more, improving your skills, and compounding your strengths.”8

    We’re all good at something, or know a lot about something. Unfortunately, we tend to think that because we’re good at that thing or know about it then everyone else must be good at it or know a lot about it too. But nine times out of ten they aren’t, and they don’t.

    A good way to identify what you’re good at (stuff you might be taking for granted) is to ask your friends and family. You might also want to pay attention to the things people come to you for advice about.

    They’re all clues.

    #6: Ask yourself, ‘What’s one thing that always lifts my mood when I do it?’

    The next time you feel particularly ‘buzzy’ or ‘high on life’, pay attention. What are you doing? And why does it make you feel that way?

    Again, the answer is usually beyond the obvious.

    For example, I always feel really high after speaking or giving a presentation. Is it the act of speaking that makes me buzzy, or the opportunity to share my ideas with a large and captive audience?

    When I finish a running race and I have a big, silly grin from ear to ear, is it the act of running that excites me or the thrill of competition?

    By taking the time to look below the surface of your excitement you’ll find there are multiple ways to get that ‘passion hit’. It was exciting to find out there were other ways I could experience the thrill of competition besides running, and that public speaking was just one of many ways I could get my ideas out into the world.

    #7: Ask yourself, ‘What can’t my friends shut me up about?’

    We’ve all experienced that situation where we’re chatting with friends and they all get a look on their face that says, “Here we go. She’s on her soapbox again”.

    Don’t let their soapbox ‘comment’, or the fact their eyes have started glazing over, deflate you. Own it, and then find a more receptive audience.

    I have a real passion for self-improvement. But it’s not something my friends or family really care about. That’s why I have a blog—so I can share my ideas and passions with people who do care.

    #8: Ask yourself, ‘What legacy do I want to leave this world?’

    In his stunning essay The Moral Bucket List written for The New York Times, David Brooks looks at people who’ve achieved a real sense of inner peace and contentment and tries to divine the difference between them and him:

    “Commencement speakers are always telling young people to follow their passions. Be true to yourself. This is a vision of life that begins with self and ends with self. But people on the road to inner light do not find their vocations by asking, what do I want from life? They ask, what is life asking of me? How can I match my intrinsic talent with one of the world’s deep needs?”9

    #1195958
    JbytheBay
    Member
    • Total posts: 38
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Tahlia, the only thing I can possibly add to this thread is perhaps if a person don’t know what their passion is, it is possible they may not yet have discovered it.

    For me the discovery came only 3 years ago and it was a web analytics course I did with Avinash Kaushik. I would prefer to call it an “extreme or strongly driven interest” more so than a passion.

    #1195959
    arrowwise
    Member
    • Total posts: 641
    Up
    0
    ::

    Don’t like the word “passion” either. You could be passionate about cooking but not really relevant to your true existence and purpose.

    “Follow your heart and the money” will follow is a great quote.

    If not obvious to yourself then other close to you can help identify the ‘why’ factor. There are some good books that explore this in greater detail, but fundamentally are all centred around the same concepts.

    For most it should be clear but isn’t obvious. Therefore it may never be clearer until later in life due to many factors including the wrong conditioning and mindset from earlier in life. No simple answer…

    #1195960
    cshiel
    Member
    • Total posts: 34
    Up
    0
    ::
    arrowwise, post: 230857, member: 54026 wrote:
    Don’t like the word “passion” either. You could be passionate about cooking but not really relevant to your true existence and purpose.

    I love cooking for friends and family but wouldn’t want to ruin it by doing it for money. Same with wine, I’m fairly passionate about that. At least whilst drinking it.

    #1195961
    earthseacreative
    Member
    • Total posts: 96
    Up
    0
    ::

    Here’s another dynamic to add to the mix.
    The notion of being a multipotentialite! Emilie Wapnick delivered an amazing TED Talk, and after watching the talk it gave me clarity around my many different talents & passions.
    My love for food & creativity struck at 6. It took a 27yr journey to return to using creativity professionally and I was serious about becoming a chef until a personal crisis struck in my late teens.
    Along the way I gained qualifications in Human-Centred Counselling, Community Welfare Work & Youth Work. Plus experience as a corporate Personal Assistant.
    And the sum of these experiences make me a proud multipotentialite!

    Hope this helps your research :)

    #1195962
    tahliamaynard
    Member
    • Total posts: 18
    Up
    0
    ::

    Wow, thank you so much for all of your input. It’s clearly something we all have identified as an important aspect of our lives at some point or another. I went with the term ‘purpose’. As I can relate to some of your comments, and I too don’t feel like I actually have a particular ‘passion’ but I definitely know my ‘purpose’.

    I took away some gems from all of your feedback and have successfully completed my guide.

    You can check it out here if you’re interested: thefreedomproject.me/free-stuff/

    Thanks again for taking the time to respond.

    Tahlia

    #1195963
    Calcul8or
    Participant
    • Total posts: 481
    Up
    0
    ::

    For me, the main three reasons I’m in business for myself are because:

    1. I’m a bit of a lone wolf (and I like it that way)
    2. Reasons I need to do something have to make sense. Too many times in my professional experience working for someone else, this hasn’t always been the case, which to someone like me, can be unbearably frustrating.
    3. I’m a nerd.

    The third point above is probably where my “passion” lies. Many moons ago, in my nearly forgotten childhood, I remember being introduced to a calculator for the very first time. It belonged to a classmate who wasn’t even my friend, but found himself with no choice but to be my friend when I suddenly became a constant companion out of the blue! lol

    I was completely fascinated by that little gadget, which always replied unfailingly with exactly the right answer whenever you asked it a question. My fascination quickly became obsession, as I began vainly trying to communicate with it, convinced that there was more than a tiny circuit board behind that screen with the illuminated digits that never blinked as they stared at you, unless the battery was nearly out.

    The best efforts of my friends to console my failure by showing me funny words you could spell if you looked at the screen upside down didn’t help very much. But the one thing my tryst with that calculator instilled in me was the realisation that numbers never lied.

    Of all the things in the world, numbers were the one immutable source of absolute truth and fact, and my obsession turned into a full blown love affair that continues to make me dizzy with excitement!

    Programmer. Analyst. Nerd. Calcul8ors.com.au Custom Software & Collaboration
    #1195964
    Cindy1875
    Member
    • Total posts: 1
    Up
    0
    ::

    My passion for making swimsuits has come from my best friend’s inspiration! She is an Australian lady; as many Aussie women who are plus size, she found it quite difficult to find flattering bathers (that made her look good and feel comfortable in them) from brick-and-mortal shops. She came to see me one day and asked me: “I know you have a fashion design skill, why don’t you design swimwear for us?”
    And from there I started a new plus size swimwear range for large size women and started selling them on my website (curvysea.com). My online business is small and I keep it that way because I want to serve my customers better and also to keep balance between running the business and looking after my family.


    Cindy at Curvysea Plus Size Swim Wear
    Tips and tricks, How to… for large women’s swimwear http://www.curvysea.com/blog/

    #1195965
    GeoffD
    Member
    • Total posts: 27
    Up
    0
    ::

    For me it has been a process of inadvertently revaluating and refining what I originally believed my ‘passion’ or purpose to be. For instance, when I first started my business 19 years ago I thought my purpose was just to make a lot of money and lead a great lifestyle (greedy, wasn’t I?)…several years down the track I developed a bit more empathy for others and believed my purpose (and that of my business) was to help our customers to recover from disasters (we managed Insurance claims)….years later, after selling that business and becoming a consultant, I felt my purpose was to help small business owners to grow their profitability and value of their business.

    Recently, I’ve been thinking that my purpose may actually be to do whatever I can to help prevent business owners from suffering from mental health issues due to the stress of running a poorly performing business. Still a bit of a ‘work in progress’ but I am certainly finding myself being drawn to that pursuit.

    Perhaps, when you are open to it, your true purpose or ‘passion’ slowly and somewhat inconspicuously presents itself?

    #1195966
    AndyWillis1960
    Member
    • Total posts: 29
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hey Tahlia
    I’m too late to provide feedback as you have now finished the guide, I did however just sign up to receive it (btw the confirm email went to my junk folder).
    I totally agree that “passionate” is an overused term and I’m so glad that you went with “purpose”. Purpose is a much more powerful force in your life than passion, you can have passion without purpose but you can’t have purpose without passion.
    The other important thing to consider is that it’s often best not to be impatient or overthink it, instead let it come to you. There is a skill in identifying and being aware of this happening though.
    Looking forward to reading your guide.
    Carpe Diem

    #1195967
    AndyWillis1960
    Member
    • Total posts: 29
    Up
    0
    ::
    JbytheBay, post: 230824, member: 77347 wrote:
    Hi Tahlia, the only thing I can possibly add to this thread is perhaps if a person don’t know what their passion is, it is possible they may not yet have discovered it.

    For me the discovery came only 3 years ago and it was a web analytics course I did with Avinash Kaushik. I would prefer to call it an “extreme or strongly driven interest” more so than a passion.

    Totally agree with “if a person don’t know what their passion is, it is possible they may not yet have discovered it”

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.