Home – New Forums Tech talk How do you choose the website platform?

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  • #1130721
    JohnTranter
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    Zava Design, post: 148294 wrote:
    See, this is the concern I have for this example, that because someone is only using one platform, they’ll be tempted to recommend that platform on occasions when it’s not the best option. I mean, if you don’t have much business on, it would be tempting, no?

    I understand where you’re coming from and do agree with you to an extent.

    So far I’ve been lucky in that my e-commerce clients are on at least their 2nd e-commerce website and have approached me with the express intent of either having a Magento website built, or fixing their existing Magento website.

    I do make sure my advertising is for Magento, rather than e-commerce.

    #1130722
    JohnTranter
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    estim8, post: 148267 wrote:
    I don’t know enough about .asp, .net or any proprietary code to pass comment on how good they are at their job … I’m just not keen on being limited to one supplier.

    As a developer asp.net is great. C# is a flexible and powerful language and the Microsoft IDE’s are some of the best I’ve used. IIS is easy to setup and configure, MSSQL Server is powerful and has a far better UI than anything I’ve found for MySQL.
    Obviously I’m a big fan but asp.net is really for enterprise customers and, as a soloist, that’s a hard market to be in.

    For years asp.net used the webform model, so websites were designed around submitting information and receiving results on the same page. In the last few years, mvc has taken hold and it’s becoming more of a traditional web platform.

    Price is the big factor. The tools are expensive, hosting is more expensive, the licenses are expensive.

    #1130723
    Shaukat Adam Khalid
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    Easy.

    Flip a 3 sided coin but it only works If you chant out loud the following in one breath – and before the coin hits the floor:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dK2qBbDn5W0&feature=youtube_gdata_player

    Oh one more thing, you’ve got to record yourself doing the above.

    Looking forward to the video

    #1130724
    Divert To Mobile
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    estim8, post: 148267 wrote:
    Sorry, was a bit obscure, LAMP … Linux (server) Apache (web server) Mysql (database) and Php (server-side programming) … basis of majority of hosting options and free CMS’s.

    Not obscure at all, LAMP is well known.
    I was referring to your comment about moving away from the LAMP stack and I presume you meant windows – the only other alternative I can think of to windows or linux would be SUN now Polaris (of which I’ve never personally used)

    Steve

    #1130725
    Greg_M
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    Divert To Mobile, post: 148313 wrote:
    Not obscure at all, LAMP is well known.
    I was referring to your comment about moving away from the LAMP stack and I presume you meant windows – the only other alternative I can think of to windows or linux would be SUN now Polaris (of which I’ve never personally used)

    Steve

    I thought you’d know what lamp was … I wasn’t talking so much about the OS at the bottom of the stack (but I prefer unix based) but the options that are becoming available in the other areas … changes in the way servers and hosting are set up, eg. EC2, Heroku, Cloudshift and lot’s more.

    I haven’t used an FTP client for over a year, don’t even have one installed on any machines.

    Maybe a lot of it’s just new to me … but a typical “stack” for what I do now, consists of using version control like Git, locally and remote, and only accessing servers from the command line with SSH keys. I now pay for “workers” or “gears” or “compute time” (whole new language), no more bandwidth or RAM as such.

    The number of available servers is changing rapidly, especially for delivering Ruby, usually tied to Apache or Nginx.

    Databases are changing too, if you use Google App engine, there is no traditional database with tables and traditional “queries” just a “big table” every object is unique and floating in what appears to me to be digital soup.

    #1130726
    Zava Design
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    JohnTranter, post: 148308 wrote:
    Obviously I’m a big fan but asp.net is really for enterprise customers and, as a soloist, that’s a hard market to be in.
    Yep, it’s not a soloist’s or small business client’s area to be in.

    I spent 10 years project managing .NET projects for major clients, and with most projects being in the 20k+ bracket, it’s pretty obvious why I (and others) saw a large gap for smaller clients who couldn’t afford 20k for a site. ;)

    And you think it’s hard finding a good php/open source developer? Try finding a good .NET developer, rare as hen’s teeth! Hence why the good ones can command an excellent salary.

    #1130727
    JohnW
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    Zava Design, post: 148293 wrote:
    Or find a developer who knows how to build an SEO optimised site.
    Hi Zava,
    Next one I find will be the first one. ;)

    Seriously, they must be out there but they’re damn hard to find.

    The real problem is the business owner won’t know how to identify them – every man, women, child and dog claims to know SEO.

    Zava Design, post: 148293 wrote:
    This comes down to the lack of skill of the developer. The admin interface for WordPress can be customised very easily to make it simple for any non-technical user to easily manage their site.
    Interesting that all of the WP sites I’ve had to SEO with have only had the default GUI.
    Is this the norm or am I seeing a biased sample?
    Regs,
    JohnW
    #1130728
    JohnTranter
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    Zava Design, post: 148349 wrote:
    Yep, it’s not a soloist’s or small business client’s area to be in.

    I spent 10 years project managing .NET projects for major clients, and with most projects being in the 20k+ bracket, it’s pretty obvious why I (and others) saw a large gap for smaller clients who couldn’t afford 20k for a site. ;)

    And you think it’s hard finding a good php/open source developer? Try finding a good .NET developer, rare as hen’s teeth! Hence why the good ones can command an excellent salary.

    5 years as a C# .Net developer until I moved out of the city. (I was using Delphi before that if that means anything to anyone)
    I actually managed to work remotely for 2 years until my old company decided I was too expensive compared to the Ukrainians they were using (who I admit were very good at their job)
    There’s not much enterprise work in the rural areas and getting a new remote job was not that easy, so turning to php/apache/mysql and going solo was a necessity for me.

    Anyway, the new challenges of running my own business and learning a different technology set has kept me busy! :)

    Are we getting slightly off track?

    #1130729
    Zava Design
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    JohnW, post: 148360 wrote:
    Hi Zava,
    Next one I find will be the first one. ;)

    Seriously, they must be out there but they’re damn hard to find.

    The real problem is the business owner won’t know how to identify them – every man, women, child and dog claims to know SEO.

    Interesting that all of the WP sites I’ve had to SEO with have only had the default GUI.
    Is this the norm or am I seeing a biased sample?
    Regs,
    JohnW
    Well you know how I mentioned above it’s hard to find a good .NET developer….? Well it’s also difficult to find “good” WordPress developers.

    The good and the bad about WordPress having a low entry level for creating a basic site:

    The good:
    – Someone with limited experience & skills can create a basic site fairly easily.

    The bad:
    – Someone with limited experience & skills can call themselves a “web developer”, when they’re not really anything of the sort.

    #1130730
    JohnW
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    Zava Design, post: 148370 wrote:
    Well you know how I mentioned above it’s hard to find a good .NET developer….? Well it’s also difficult to find “good” WordPress developers.
    Hi Zava,
    I know it’s true of every brand of cms/cart specialist developer.

    The standard CMS manual these days seems to be “(Insert your CMS name) for Dummies” and then the “developer” seems to be only one page ahead in the book.

    The longer I’m in this game the higher the incidence of dumbed-down and stuffed up websites I see.
    I get no pleasure telling a business owner that their cheapest approach to SEO is to start all over again and redesign, restructure and reconfigure their site’s publishing system

    For a start they don’t want to believe you so they fumble around trying to find someone who will offer an alternative solution – usually more money and time wasted.

    I’m trying to help rescue a 6 month old Magento disaster at present. The client had spent $16k with the now sacked developer.

    It took the client 5 months to give up trying and come back to me for help.

    The problem for small business owners is how to assess which people have the necessary skills? That applies to designers, developers, copywriters, social media specialists and especially to SEOs.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1130731
    Zava Design
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    JohnW, post: 148382 wrote:
    Hi Zava,
    I know it’s true of every brand of cms/cart specialist developer.

    The standard CMS manual these days seems to be “(Insert your CMS name) for Dummies” and then the “developer” seems to be only one page ahead in the book.

    The longer I’m in this game the higher the incidence of dumbed-down and stuffed up websites I see.
    Yep. And unfortunately in the pursuit of supposedly saving a few dollars, they can end up losing far more in the longer term.

    The problem for small business owners is how to assess which people have the necessary skills? That applies to designers, developers, copywriters, social media specialists and especially to SEOs.

    References and referrals from previous clients, and websites that you can see and use. It’s really the only way to gauge someone when not having the technical skills yourself to do so. Same as you would engaging a builder, you’d want to see his previous work, speak to his previous clients. If any service provider can’t provide you with this information – and enough of it so you know he’s not hiding mostly bad feedback – then look for somebody else.

    I wouldn’t let a mechanic touch my car unless I had been told be a few people that they did good work. Why on earth would someone risk their business – their livelihood – for anything less??

    #1130732
    LisaK
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    It would be almost impossible for a web site developer to be able to offer all platforms unless they are out sourcing the majority of the work, and even in that case they would have be be proficient enough to quality check the work.

    We used to develop all our clients sites by hand coding them, but in the end it all comes down to the $$$ we couldn’t produce 1/2 of what developers could offer for the $$$. So with a lot of research we now use a few different platforms.

    We generally would recommend WP of course as it’s easy for the client to use and update themselves and is great for SEO.

    A Joomla site for more complex sites that want more growth potential.

    In saying that however to give the client the best service if we find these options are not the best for them we have a variety of other website designers we recommend to clients.

    Hope that all make sense…..

    #1130733
    arvoApp
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    I’ve used Joomla and WP as CMS. After a little while I found WP more suitable for small businesses who just want a simple website that is SEO friendly and they can quickly learn how to update content themselves.

    I like how quickly you can set up a WP powered website. Yet it can be highly customized to suit the client via plethora of premium or even free themes. With a small fee it’s also possible to schedule automated backups.

    Based on my experience WP sites require little maintenance. When setting it up though make sure all the security measures are implemented and only install a handful of plugins from trusted developers.

    #1130734
    ozneilau
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    Brent@Ontrax, post: 148224 wrote:
    How does everyone choose the correct website format, CMS solution or platform for your clients? Do you as a Web Designer/Developer consider the clients full requirements or do you just stick with what you know and sell them that solution? … What is the preferred medium for the SEO’s? As this process should be done before a website is even designed and/or written.

    Hi Brent,

    To be good at what I do, I tend to concentrate on one CMS. The CMS system I prefer seems to be versatile enough for all of my clients needs who are small to medium businesses.

    I don’t understand how anyone can be an expert in two or three different CMSs. Things change so quickly with new versions and new extensions being constantly released etc, it’s hard enough keeping up with one!

    I have occasionally referred clients elsewhere if I thought that a different CMS would be more suitable for their particular project or if they are particularly keen on a CMS that I’m not familiar with.

    As far as SEO goes, I think each CMS has their own quirks and preferred extensions to help with SEO and service seekers should try to find a CMS expert who is also an SEO expert in the particular CMS or an independent SEO expert who is familiar with the particular CMS at least to do the on-site SEO.

    Neil.

    #1130735
    Paul Warren
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    Any CMS can be optimised for search engines.

    These days it’s more what you are pointing at a site, than what you do to a site anyway.

    Anyone who says otherwise, has no write to claim they know how to do SEO.

    And you rarely, if ever, need to completely scrap a website, to get a site ranking well.

    If someone tells you that, find someone who knows what they’re talking about.

    It’s a money making exercise for them.

    – Paul.

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