Home – New Forums Marketing mastery How do you tell someone their website looks like crap!?

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  • #982882
    BrettM33
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    Sometimes I come across business websites that look AND function terrible; the business really could do with a new website built for them.

    I’m not a big fan of cold calling/emailing in the first place, but how do you email a business & say something like “Oh, your website looks like crap, how about I build you a new one?” without them being offended lol

    So they first have to get past the fact you’re marketing to them via email to try and sell them your services, but then you’re also telling them their website looks awful.

    #1139413
    Brent@Ontrax
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    1. Don’t tell them their website looks crap. You know it and they “may” know it but if you start off by being negative then the mood is set for the email already, and the chances are they will delete it immediately.
    2. Introduce yourself (briefly) and state how you came about finding their site and that you found it difficult to navigate and find what you were looking for.
    3. Prepare a quick image of how it could look and then present them with a jpg. A picture tells a thousand words.
    4. Then actually ask for some information on a product, turns the focus back on them to reply as they release that you aren’t just trying to sell your services but really you are.

    Remember to always Thank them and have your contact details as well as a link to your website in your email signature, so they can research you.

    Hope this helps.
    Brent

    #1139414
    BrettM33
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    That’s some good advice – thanks Brent! :)

    #1139415
    John Romaine
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    Put a simple email together that outlines what you do and how it can be beneficial to the customer. Sell the result.

    Copy and paste that sucker into as many contact forms as possible.

    Brent@Ontrax, post: 159092 wrote:
    1. Prepare a quick image of how it could look and then present them with a jpg. A picture tells a thousand words.

    I wouldn’t do this.

    You can be sitting around all day creating “nice” mockups, but that’s not going to put money in your pocket.

    Move quickly.

    #1139416
    NathanB
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    For the best response avoid talking about the “look/design” of the website altogether. (it’s gibberish to most site owners and many of them already know what they have isn’t necessarily a premium product).

    When prospecting the a new customer, ask them leading questions and give them an opportunity to talk about themselves – people love this (usually).

    Ask them what sort of lead generation/conversion they are achieving and what that means to their business in the context of the over all marketing mix and bottom line…

    Once you have that information, you are in a very good position to pitch them a significant improvement in the bottom line (not just their website looks).

    #1139417
    LucasArthur
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    Hey C

    Not that i am in this field… although the first thing i must say is that telling somebody that what they already have is CRAP may actually be insulting the owner of the business..

    Imagine if the owners kids built the site because they are web site designers (apparently)? Not really a good way to start an attempt to sell somebody something as you already have them off side.

    Best bet would be to offer them some free advice, send them a link to an article on your own web site outlining the BEST things to implement on a web site should you be considering altering it.. maybe you have several pages, one for ecommerce, one for tradies, one for retail (no ecom) etc etc and the link is tailored to the business you are trying to woo over…

    Maybe the tag could be “are you currently satisfied with your return or sales from your current web site”.. going on to “with a few minor tweaks and little if any cost, this could be improved’… and offer some free advise on how they can tweak the web site themselves and in most cases they will not have access to the back end which will then potentially lead to a call or email to yourself to offer some further advice…

    Its all about engaging and having them see you as the ‘expert’ and becoming the ‘go to person’ with knowledge, this eventually builds trust and leads being generated for you.. hopefully..

    Again, i am certainly not an expert so feel free to pic through my comments.. although it tends to be a nice sales process if you put the time and effort into it.. because with the lead up to the sale, the client who finally makes the time to contact you re his web site has pretty much already decided to GO WITH YOU due to the hard work and advice you have already exhibited..

    Cheers
    Jason

    Jason Ramage | Lucas Arthur Pty Ltd | E: [email protected]   P: 61 3 8324 0344    M: 61 412 244 888
    #1139418
    BrettM33
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    Thanks for all the response guys. Some good advice.

    @SimplyReplica: Well I would never tell someone their website looks like crap haha, hence the post! ;)

    #1139419
    MatthewKeath
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    When I first started in this industry, I though that there would be so much work because so many peoples websites are awful!

    Alas it was not to be.

    #1139420
    FindYourIdealCustomers
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    NathanB, post: 159128 wrote:
    For the best response avoid talking about the “look/design” of the website altogether. (it’s gibberish to most site owners and many of them already know what they have isn’t necessarily a premium product).

    I like this point Nathan but will expand on my thoughts.

    I have spoken with dozens of clients that have had wonderful looking websites designed, they love them, their friends love them but they don’t provide what a good website needs, better conversion rates.

    A website is simply a tool to generate new business. Most business people see it as an expense. Why should they spend $3k to get a fresh new website? This money can be used generate traffic to the site. In you only build nice looking websites, it might be a tough slog… but if you focus on building websites that increase conversions rates then this is how I would go about it.

    I would suggest you need to be putting a business context to why investing in your services would be beneficial. Anyone can build a website, I can buy a fancy template for $45 from the internet. If you convince them they need a new site, they will shop around.

    Good example would be:

    A case study: We completed a new website for XYZ and the result was a 100% increase in number of website leads form 25-50. The net result for that business was increased monthly revenues of $25,000 month one.

    Most businesses can relate to the number of leads they get each month. Investing $3k to get back $20k changes the mind set to incurring another expense to making a smart business decision.

    You are also differentiating yourself as more that a run of the mill web designer.

    #1139421
    LucasArthur
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    CondorCreative, post: 159159 wrote:
    @SimplyReplica: Well I would never tell someone their website looks like crap haha, hence the post! ;)

    Cant stop laughing, almost fell off my chair.. ;)

    You would never know these days,,, LOL.. so many people have foot in mouth disease that it can be dangerous…….

    Actually, i know you wouldnt cos i think you have visited mine and i haven’t had a message telling me yet! :confused:

    Take it easy mate, glad you see the marginal humour i have deployed…

    Jason

    Jason Ramage | Lucas Arthur Pty Ltd | E: [email protected]   P: 61 3 8324 0344    M: 61 412 244 888
    #1139422
    Shaukat Adam Khalid
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    All you have to do is ask them about their roi and offer a better return and guarantee it with a money back option.

    Business owners in the main only care about sales. The website is a means to an end and it’s likely that the website is not performing so they just left it at that.

    Talk sales and profits and you will always have a business owner’s attention.

    #1139423
    BrettM33
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    FindYourIdealCustomers , post: 159167 wrote:
    I like this point Nathan but will expand on my thoughts.

    I have spoken with dozens of clients that have had wonderful looking websites designed, they love them, their friends love them but they don’t provide what a good website needs, better conversion rates.

    A website is simply a tool to generate new business. Most business people see it as an expense. Why should they spend $3k to get a fresh new website? This money can be used generate traffic to the site. In you only build nice looking websites, it might be a tough slog… but if you focus on building websites that increase conversions rates then this is how I would go about it.

    I would suggest you need to be putting a business context to why investing in your services would be beneficial. Anyone can build a website, I can buy a fancy template for $45 from the internet. If you convince them they need a new site, they will shop around.

    Good example would be:

    A case study: We completed a new website for XYZ and the result was a 100% increase in number of website leads form 25-50. The net result for that business was increased monthly revenues of $25,000 month one.

    Most businesses can relate to the number of leads they get each month. Investing $3k to get back $20k changes the mind set to incurring another expense to making a smart business decision.

    You are also differentiating yourself as more that a run of the mill web designer.

    Well it’s good that you mention that as that’s one thing I try and focus on with my clients; not just building the website, but doing more to try and make the site successful.

    SimplyReplica, post: 159187 wrote:
    Cant stop laughing, almost fell off my chair.. ;)

    You would never know these days,,, LOL.. so many people have foot in mouth disease that it can be dangerous…….

    Actually, i know you wouldnt cos i think you have visited mine and i haven’t had a message telling me yet! :confused:

    Take it easy mate, glad you see the marginal humour i have deployed…

    Jason

    How could your website be crap when it has a “naked” woman on it!? :p

    Khalid Adam, post: 159205 wrote:
    All you have to do is ask them about their roi and offer a better return and guarantee it with a money back option.

    Business owners in the main only care about sales. The website is a means to an end and it’s likely that the website is not performing so they just left it at that.

    Talk sales and profits and you will always have a business owner’s attention.

    Being a small business it’s pretty hard to offer a guarantee like that; nor would I want to.

    #1139424
    Brent Foster
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    CondorCreative, post: 159080 wrote:
    Sometimes I come across business websites that look AND function terrible; the business really could do with a new website built for them.

    I’m not a big fan of cold calling/emailing in the first place, but how do you email a business & say something like “Oh, your website looks like crap, how about I build you a new one?” without them being offended lol

    So they first have to get past the fact you’re marketing to them via email to try and sell them your services, but then you’re also telling them their website looks awful.

    As a Business Analyst, I believe that it is important to be honest and transperant in your approach. You should be tactful of course, however as a service provider is it important to provide the customer with constructive feedback.

    I would present them with a problem / opportunity statement, a list of the drivers for fixing their website (ie. bad functionality is preventing customers from making it to a shopping cart etc), and the quantifiable / measurable benefits ($$) that will be achieved as a result of your service. If they can clearly see the benefit and return on investment, then they are more than likely going to accept the proposal.

    I recently lead the business analysis activities on the redevelopment of a major corporate website. The project was driven by the marketing department, so it was naturally assumed that the benefits would all be ‘warm and fuzzy’, however I managed to identify the quantifiable benefits (both in failed sales as a result of poor funtionality, and additional staff required to provide IT support to customers), and was able to secure a project budget of $1mil.

    The $$ benefits really drive the level of investment that a customer is willing to make, so your feedback should be well receieved if you can back it up with those 3 things– drivers, solution, benefits.

    Hope this helps!

    #1139425
    JohnTranter
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    I was listening to a podcast yesterday about duplicate copy on websites and one of their suggestions was never to sound accusatory

    i.e. instead of saying
    You have a crap website because…”

    you say
    “Whoever did your website, was crap because…”

    The first one will lead to an argument.
    The second one will lead to agreement.

    I’ve never tried this myself however!

    #1139426
    The Copy Chick
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    Maybe put together a slick whitepaper… something along the lines of “The Elements of a Successful Website” and use this to address all the things that web owners get wrong and how it ‘should’ be. Finish it with a checklist so they can score their own site against an ideal site.

    You could then send an email outlining what the whitepaper is about (eg. “Is your website working as hard as it should for you? Find out with our free checklist. Download today and also discover how to fix any problems your site might have.”) and the people who are interested in maximising the potential of their site will (hopefully) download it and get in touch once they realise they need to do a bit of work.

    Saves having to have that awkward conversation.

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