Home – New Forums Marketing mastery How do you use promotional items? (giveaways, etc.)

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #989248
    dangaff
    Member
    • Total posts: 244
    Up
    0
    ::

    Some people of course give away little items with each sale, others for big sellers, perhaps other give away’s for new signups.

    I’m mainly talking about promotional items here, such as; bottle openers, shirts, stubby coolers, mouse pads etc. – how do you guys find the best way to get the most value for the give away?

    I recently got a delivery for 100 stubby coolers which I have a few options in mind but am also keeping the options open.

    I was originally just going to give out a cooler for every new person that signs up and lists an item (auction house type website), but realised it could be inefficient and wasting too much money for little gain. I don’t think it’ll take long to use up all those coolers.
    I’ve seen other things like pre-launch campaigns etc but I don’t think it’ll apply that well in this scenario.

    Looking forward to the replies

    Thanks

    (Additionally, are there any specific promotional items you find people like more than others?)

    #1171207
    JohnW
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,642
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Dangaff,
    Promo items like this are are often used as:

    • Message life extenders
    • Brand awareness & brand reminders

    Medical reps frequently leave pens and note pads after they talk to doctors for these reasons.

    Pens and pads are popular as there is a good chance they will be left on the doctor’s desk for awarenes of the brand name long after the rep has left. You want to use them to extend your message also.

    You are right to pause to think hard about who you give them to.

    I presume you don’t have sales reps making sales and developing contacts.

    Don’t waste them by giving them to list signers.

    You want to give them to people who may influence others to use your services or,

    to people who will be using/displaying them where your potential clients congregate.

    I don’t know your industry. Are there gun clubs, shooting ranges that also hold meetings/events where your promo items could be given away as their prizes? I’d dole them out over a period of time so that they become prizes awarded say, once per month. That would get your brand name/service repeated to groups of potential customers over time. You want a long message time extension because (I assume) any individual gun owner is a very infrequent potential customer.

    In your case, I’d explore promo items that:

    • have a long life
    • may be used in the field (gun club / shooting)
    • are large enough to include your message

    What about pen knives, key rings or torches?

    You also want a simple message on your promo items. Perhaps:

    “(Your name)
    We buy and sell used guns
    (your web address or phone number)”

    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1171208
    arrowwise
    Member
    • Total posts: 641
    Up
    0
    ::

    What are you trying to achieve? build your brand? be remembered? or just create a warm feeling in the eyes of your client.

    First work out what you want to achieve.
    Then focus on a product that will actually be used and kept for a while.

    Too many of these promo items that are given out are turfed in the bin quick fast. Big waste for all involved.

    Of the A to Z of promo items only a handful stand the test of time. Just look around at what you tend to keep around your desk as a starting point.

    #1171209
    MissSassy
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,255
    Up
    0
    ::

    Giving them to potential clients and not just people who are already clients is a way of spreading the word.

    Naturally stubby holders need to go to people who are likely to use them too!

    #1171210
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840
    Up
    0
    ::

    What are you trying to achieve? build your brand? be remembered? or just create a warm feeling in the eyes of your client.

    Realistically, there is only one thing to achieve from promotional products.

    You give a promotional product to a prospective customer, it is in the hope they will buy stuff from you.

    You give a promo product to an existing customer it is in the hope they will stay loyal and buy more stuff from you.

    You give a promo product out because you want people to know about your brand so that they will know what you do and buy stuff from you.

    You stick a promo product with an existing product in the hope it will entice people to buy stuff from you.

    How you cater to each group may differ slightly, but promo products are advertising and unless you get a return from people buying stuff then your advertising dollar is wasted.

    Of the A to Z of promo items only a handful stand the test of time. Just look around at what you tend to keep around your desk as a starting point.

    Sorry, I don’t agree with that. Anything can be a promo product. Yes, the promo product should be useful, but having several useful pens for example, hasn’t made me march out and buy stuff from those companies.

    Here is a story I wrote with my thoughts on promo items and how they are perceived.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140812040105-169973897-what-is-the-value-of-a-promotional-product

    #1171211
    The Fat Badger
    Member
    • Total posts: 1
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Dangaff….. and welcome!

    Promotional items are a difficult marketing investment; primarily because the value generated by them is difficult, if not impossible, to determine.

    I’ve seen thousands of cooler’s and similar items handed out at trade shows; in most cases getting lost amongst all of the other freebies being distributed by other organisations including your competitors. The same applies to other sales environments also.

    You also run the risk of insulting some customers by providing a relatively low cost promotional item and expecting anything more than a thank you.

    One of the best uses of promotional items I have seen is the inclusion of a small low cost item in the box when delivering an order to a customer.
    The item is unexpected and has been delivered in an indirect manner which both acts as a pleasant surprise and also avoids any awkwardness that may arise between giver and receiver.

    I’m aware of one organisation that includes a pack of sweets/candies in each delivery. Employees at the purchasing company look forward to receiving the deliveries and the practice is widely known throughout the company, not just by those in purchasing or stores receiving. It’s not too hard to guess which orders are receipted in first…and are memorable.

    The use of a tactic such as this is, of course, dependant upon your business being based on recurring sales/purchases.

    Some of the best, most effective, marketing solutions are free.

    A simple, hand-written, thank you note delivered within a few weeks after a purchase can do more for customer referrals, loyalty and repeat sales than most paid solutions. It’s also a great idea for businesses which sell items that represent a reasonably significant investment for the purchaser, say from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars.

    My advice, send a thank you note, together with a cooler, to customers a few weeks after they have received/made their purchase.

    Don’t discriminate based on the value of the purchase either; customers often make smaller purchases to test the service and benefits of dealing with an organisation before going on to make larger purchases. You also never know who they know and may refer.

    cheers,

    The Fat Badger

    P.s. If you found this useful then drop by http://www.thefatbadgersguidetosales.com

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.