Home – New Forums Starting your journey How much information should i provide a prospective client?

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  • #984480
    flyer
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    I sometimes find it hard to determine if I am giving away too much before starting out on a project. In the initial specs creating phase, there is usually some research involved. I don’t tend to spend too much time doing it because I am not sure if I end up getting the project but sometimes I tend to get carried away and feel I am using too much of my time researching for the prospective client. How do you guys handle this?

    #1147821
    AgentMail
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    I can only speak from expectation, not experience. But my expectation would be you should do enough research to understand the need/scope of the project, but a full project implementation plan should be charged for.

    The first part of understanding the need is really part of the sales process, and should be treated as such. Beyond this, you are basically starting the project, so it should be charged for.

    If you pitch well after your initial research, you should find the next part is easier

    #1147822
    Chris H
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    My answer would be that it depends on the potential profit of the project and whether the information you are supplying is to your detriment in any way.

    I sell larger ticket items and I always put in massive leg work before a PO has even been hinted at. Larger projects by nature are fragile and sometimes you have to write the business case for the customer to get the project across the line. This means I give away all the implementation plan.
    I am always careful to not give enough away that the customer can cobble their own solution together with my IP.

    Apart from that, it’s just risk vs reward. What is the potential profit of the job and how will not doing the research impact the chances of winning the order. I target 100% closure rates for all inquiries that proceed to order (i.e. if they order with someone it should be me). In reality I would settle for 80%, but this means a lot of work and cost up front.

    #1147823
    PerfectNotes-Kathy
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    Hi flyer,

    I have to agree with the previous two comments – it really depends on the circumstances. I have had some prospects where the amount of effort put in before guarantee of the sale is enormous, and some where a minimal amount is required before the order is received – and some of each have been won and lost. A lot will also depend on who else is working on gaining that sale – you need to do at least the same amount as your competitors.

    Kathy

    #1147824
    MatthewKeath
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    I used to do very detailed proposals before any work started, but I do things different know.

    I do a pre proposal – basically some general info about the project, how I would tackle it, a timeline, and some proposed costings.

    The first phase of my website build it called the ‘Discovery and Planning’ I charge for that instead of a deposit for the project.

    During that I do all the work that is needed to fully complete the project. Often I find things out in this from the client that was never mentioned, and I can change the costings as needed.

    This way I am not a) Working for free and b) Trying to do a full proposal with limited understanding.

    I understand this is how the giant web agencies do it.

    #1147825
    Tony Manto
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    flyer, post: 169572 wrote:
    I sometimes find it hard to determine if I am giving away too much before starting out on a project. In the initial specs creating phase, there is usually some research involved. I don’t tend to spend too much time doing it because I am not sure if I end up getting the project but sometimes I tend to get carried away and feel I am using too much of my time researching for the prospective client. How do you guys handle this?

    I would defiantly spit this process into two parts.

    One would be a free analysis and the second part would be a detail prospective. This would involved a detailed questionnaire that would fee back as report outlining all the steps they need to consider and what your service will do for them. The second part can be a template to reduce time generating it.

    You could also offer a payment refund if they go ahead.

    “We can offer you a full detailed plan for ($197) which we will refund should you take our recommendations.

    Tony Manto
    Strategy Specialist
    [email protected]
    0400 902 717

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