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  • #1181009
    Will @ ABB
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    Justin Laju, post: 211930 wrote:
    Telemarketing is a very sustainable and solid way to build rapport and introduce yourself to new business owners.

    It does work well for book keeping and accounting services.

    Thanks Justin, I had thought of direct telemarketing before but no idea what sort of cost I’d be looking at. I think we’ll probably try out the letterbox drops and google adwords for the next couple of weeks and maybe look at some different options depending on the results.

    Thanks for the thoughts though!

    #1181010
    Earnie
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    Hi Will,

    Lots of great ideas already here. I’ve been talking in my circles (mostly mums running ‘creative’ businesses) about their dislike of number crunching. Perhaps there are clients in your area that muddle through keeping their books who could benefit from your services?

    I realise this is a very niche potential clientele, but visiting local craft fairs, farmers’ markets, or artists’ co-ops might be useful to get the word out.

    Earnie

    #1181011
    dean11
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    Thanks to Kelly for drawing attention to Lucinda’s comments. I actually copied the “Interact Endlessly” section to my diary.
    If you go to a Chamber of Commerce or Business Association meeting, you will certainly meet lots of other business owners, which is excellent if your aim is B2B, but I used to find it a horrid, phoney experience. I’m not an extrovert, I can’t bound up to a stranger and start yacking, so it felt like a lie and it wasn’t pleasant.
    But now I think even if the other person is in some totally different field, we have a lot in common. We like to be our own boss, to take risks and create. So these people are my natural friends.

    About cold calling. The opposite of cold calling is when you put a sign on your door, or create a website, or get a listing somewhere, and wait for people to come to you. Cold calling is going to them. You ring, or send a flyer, or front up to their front desk. I always feel uncomfortable about it, but it is surprising how often people forgive you for intruding and respond by giving you some work. The best way that I have used in recent years is to send a text message or an email. Both these methods allow the recipient to delete the message, put it aside for later, etc., without having to put time and energy into interacting with you, the uninvited stranger. If the words you write are powerful enough, occasionally they will reach someone who is ready for a change.

    #1181012
    Will @ ABB
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    Thanks Earnie – it does sound like a small niche, but also definitely one worth exploring!


    @Dean
    – I’m completely the same! I am sure that there are loads of opportunities that will pop up through things like cold-calling and networking events, I guess it it just sounds that little bit outside my comfort zone. But I guess that’s what being your own boss is all about, the responsibility that comes with the freedom and opportunity. I really appreciate everyone’s 2cents – has been eye-opening to say the least. Lot’s of different strategies coming up for me in the near future. I’ll post up here what results/successes/failures come out of it all

    #1181013
    ThexArm
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    Once you get few clients then hopefully you could get few more using customer lists of those clients. :-)

    #1181014
    Abcer
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    Will @ ABB, post: 211242 wrote:
    I do like the idea of flyers direct to the business owner but I guess the problem is in identifying where that target market is. It does sound like a lot of time and money to find a needle in a haystack. Any thoughts on how to better target business owners directly?

    The local post office can do a letter (flyer) drop into commercial user post office boxes.
    Just contact your local post office and they will give you the information, costs etc.
    They will also do any adjoining post offices you might want to select.

    #1181015
    Will @ ABB
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    Abcer, post: 212157 wrote:
    The local post office can do a letter (flyer) drop into commercial user post office boxes.
    Just contact your local post office and they will give you the information, costs etc.
    They will also do any adjoining post offices you might want to select.

    I had wondered about this, wasn’t sure what sort of cost they would charge but if it means it’s going solely to commercial users then it will probably be worthwhile. Cheers for the tip!

    #1181016
    Big Note
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    Abcer, post: 212157 wrote:
    The local post office can do a letter (flyer) drop into commercial user post office boxes.
    Just contact your local post office and they will give you the information, costs etc.
    They will also do any adjoining post offices you might want to select.

    They can do this at quite a reasonable price but check the size of your brochure carefully against the Australia Post guidelines. A small difference in size can make a big difference in price. I learnt from experience. An A5 brochure is classified as a large item, but a small difference in size (or format) can save quite a lot.

    Graham Apolony
    Big Note Marketing

    #1181017
    georgeleighton1
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    From my experience with my client’s, LinkedIn is a great introduction tool and follow up tool when combined with event networking. This is due to the specific targeting options advertising has though filters (Industry, job title, Income, Geotargeting etc).

    Let me know if I can help in anyway – http://www.georgeleighton.com

    #1181018
    Chris H
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    ThexArm, post: 211270, member: 62768 wrote:
    Try to target an industry – cafes, restaurants, hair salons, real-estate agencies or dentists etc etc… get flyers printed and do the walk in for 2 or 3 days a week until you get enough clients to keep you busy.

    I love this post so much.
    I am 37yo but as old schools s you can get when it comes to marketing.
    Without a shadow of a doubt I believe I can generate more business in one week of door knocking than a year of social networking, SEO and direct mail. I am not saying you shouldn’t do these other things, but they will only ever represent a fraction of the business required to keep you busy.
    The idea of targeting specific industries with literature is brilliant, in the B2B space you can spend an afternoon in an Industrial area and guaranteed get people to speak. As valuable as the sale is understanding the customer’s business, what is important to them, where past suppliers have let them down. The more you understand your customer the better your pitch.

    I have watched people on here lose their businesses simply because they didn’t want to get out of their comfort zone and pound the pavement. I find it equal measures of tragic and crazy.
    I have a customer to this day that I picked up from a cold call who has ordered millions of dollars worth of equipment.

    #1181019
    Kelly Exeter FS Editor
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    Hey all – thought this most excellent post Jayne Tancred wrote last week adds a bit to this conversation – it’s all about doing the kind of marketing that’s best suited to your personality :)

    http://www.flyingsolo.com.au/marketing/business-marketing/whats-your-marketing-superpower

    #1181020
    thekindconsultant
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    Target, target, target…

    Small business owners in Adelaide is too broad. Do you have a particular interest or expertise? Perhaps you play golf – target businesses in the golf industry. One of the easiest ways to create a target market, other than seeing where market research leads you, is to start on common ground. Me, I am a greenie… Hence, I like to work with environmentally-conscious businesses with my marketing consultancy, The Kind Consultant. Why does this common ground make for good targeting? Well, it’s easier to 1. strike up a conversation with potential leads, 2. through other associations I have access to these potential leads, and 3. I have a good understanding of sub-niches which may be largely untapped by my competition.

    #1181021
    Chris H
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    Kelly Exeter FS Editor, post: 212662, member: 63738 wrote:
    Hey all – thought this most excellent post Jayne Tancred wrote last week adds a bit to this conversation – it’s all about doing the kind of marketing that’s best suited to your personality :)

    http://www.flyingsolo.com.au/marketing/business-marketing/whats-your-marketing-superpower

    Unfortunately, I disagree with the article.
    Running a business is about getting out of your comfort zone, labelling yourself an introvert is excusing yourself from the environment of face to face selling… Which is fine… As long as you don’t mind going broke.

    I would encourage anyone who wants to run a small business to first and foremost focus on their face to face sales ability.

    #1181022
    bb1
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    Chris H, post: 212976, member: 45873 wrote:
    Unfortunately, I disagree with the article.
    Running a business is about getting out of your comfort zone, labelling yourself an introvert is excusing yourself from the environment of face to face selling… Which is fine… As long as you don’t mind going broke.

    I would encourage anyone who wants to run a small business to first and foremost focus on their face to face sales ability.

    So introverts cant run small business’s? and introverts small business’s go broke,?

    This is a vary generalized view of the world, all personality traits have benefits to bring to business, not one trait has everything that is suitable for business.

    #1181023
    Chris H
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    You’re entirely correct and if your business is more than one person you can afford to employ people people who have the skills you may lack as a business owner. I do this myself, I would not however recommend that anyone who was unwilling to do face to face selling start a business.

    My personal experience in business and amongst friends and families is that people make excuses for not going out and knocking on doors… Sometimes their reasons are valid, most of the time they are excuses.

    Their are an incredibly small number of work from home micro-businesses that can make enough money from a passive sales effort (i.e. Web site and social media profile) to be a primary source of income.

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