Home – New Forums Marketing mastery Idea for graffit prevention product

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #967014
    leighatkins
    Member
    • Total posts: 7
    Up
    0
    ::

    I have been mulling over an idea for preventing graffiti which I know is not currently on the market as yet (or last time I enquired).

    Most graffiti-proofing products are self-sacrificing – that is they wash off with the removal of the graffiti itself. They only make removal of the offending material easier but they must be reapplied every time you have cleaned the paint off. Some products will last a few times but will eventually have to be reapplied.

    Have you ever tried to spray paint on a surface with paraffin wax on it? Probably not as I am sure that you are all good law-abiding citizens… Well, it just balls up and runs off, and if you are a graffiti artist (or whatever they call themselves), that is most dissatisfying as you can’t even make a start. You would be more likely to just go somewhere else and not return, which is what we all want, right?

    Well, my idea is to combine paraffin wax with a solvent (I think benzene is the one but I may be wrong) and to spray the surface you intend to keep clean of graffiti eg. train, fence etc. The liquid paint balls up and streams onto the ground etc. in puddles which just wastes their precious medium. A hosing with cold water removes any residue that just happens to have stuck but most times, one cannot even tell that the graffiti artist was even there. The paraffin coating does not come off unless you purposefully remove it with a hot steamer so it is not self-sacrificing. As for how long it lasts, I don’t know that yet because I have not done any extensive testing along those lines. The surface would have to be properly cleaned before application, but that is standard for any graffiti-proofing anyway. It is a completely colourless and transparent coating and it dries pretty quickly after application (one would need protective clothing etc. according to OH&S).

    It would seem to be the ultimate in graffiti-proofing coats so if someone could comment on this and let me know what they think about feasibility etc. I would appreciate it.

    #1022662
    Anonymous
    Guest
    • Total posts: 11,464
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Leigh, and thanks for joining the forum :)

    Wow, you have some very cool ideas! You might like to check out the links in this post from Robert earlier in the week: http://www.flyingsolo.com.au/forums/other-discussions/5284-calling-all-innovators-inventors.html#post26465

    All the best,
    Jayne

    #1022663
    King
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,212
    Up
    0
    ::

    sounds good, especially if it can be spray or roller applied. I have concerns over yellowing over time and the effect of hot summer sun on it, walls can get pretty damned hot and it may have a negative effect.

    Ease of removal and if it penetrates the original surface (creating issues when repainting is needed) are considerations. Maybe a special base coat would be needed first?

    I know there were non-sacrificing products on the market about 20 years ago, but would have no idea now, so your research is likely right.

    #1022664
    leighatkins
    Member
    • Total posts: 7
    Up
    0
    ::

    Re: Idea for graffiti prevention product

    Hi ‘King’
    You have some good points there.
    Parrafin wax is a largely inert substance that your grandma used to seal off her preserves into her jamjars to stop them oxidizing or becoming mouldy in storage. It is used in cheap fast-burning candles and in my experience, remains white/clear for seemingly ever.
    It will act as a sealant and therefore may need 2 to 3 coats on timber fences or bare brick walls etc. as it will soak in and may be uneconomical or undesireable for such uses, but most surfaces would be non-porous ie. colourbond fencing etc.
    Full exposure to the hot sun all day may melt the coating slightly and in theory may even liquify the coating whilst it is hot which would prompt one to ask if there are any compounds out there which can increase the level of melting point (effictively setting it) so that only intentional removal can be carried out.

    #1022665
    King
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,212
    Up
    0
    ::

    hes, thats where your product development will be so important. creating a unique, patentable product maybe!

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.