Home – New Forums Tech talk Is IT worth it?

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  • #978841
    Uncomplicating
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    After some comments on Windows 8 for $40 I’m inspired to start a new thread.

    IT is expensive up front. Of that there is little doubt. Hardware, software, training, inefficiencies post implementation and so on, all contribute to the over all spend. But over time, these should be negated by the opportunities provided by the solution

    The purpose of computerised systems is to deliver efficiency and/or functionality. We might have a system that allows to do a job 2 times quicker, saving wage costs in the long term or perhaps helping us be quicker to market. Or, we may have a system allows us to work out more accurate stock requirements, something we’d never have done before, freeing up valuable cash resources for other projects.

    Regardless, the systems should provide a benefit of some sort, but I get the feeling that that’s not always the case.

    So, who gets value for money out of their BUSINESS IT solutions, and perhaps more importantly, who doesn’t?

    #1109875
    Divert To Mobile
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    There is no simple or uncomplicated answer to that :)

    #1109876
    Anonymous
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    IT is just another business expense and like all expenses should be viewed on what value does it bring to the business.

    Depending on your business the purchase and use of a computer system can be of value, in keeping track of stock or managing your accounts, but before you purchase any computer system for your business you need to know what you want the system for.

    For example you would not buy a Double B if all you need is a delivery van. A computer system is no dfferent, why pay for an expensive system if it’s not required.

    Just my 2cents worth.

    #1109877
    JohnTranter
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    Ok, to try and get things rolling, here’s two of mine that didn’t work:

    My tablet was bought for the purpose being able to write blog entries, watch IT videos, do online learning. In reality I’ve used it for reading books, buying presents and checking facebook in front of the t.v. It’s fantastic, but for work purposes it’s been a failure.

    When I started being self employed, I used an online project management system. After a while I realised that I spent plenty of time entering data and the results were basically a reproduction of the data I had on my computer. People I work with prefer emails and dropbox for sharing ideas and files so it wasn’t used; I was the only one using it.
    Now I just organise my computer better (and make backups)

    #1109878
    yourvirtualboard
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    IT should be an enabler and not a blocker is how I see it and my own personal philosophy is to keep things simple and am in agreement with Clive – fit for purpose and this shouldn’t be left to the salesman to advise as that usually results in features that might be nice to have but generally don’t get used to any benefit. For me advice from an expert would be my first step and then I can make an informed choice. I’ve seen businesses spend $250K plus on ERP systems that don’t quite do what they want / expect but once installed it’s a little late to be finding out.

    #1109879
    bluepenguin
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    I’ve had the same experience as JohnTranter with a tablet: I purchased it with the intention of using it as a sales tool, but it has now taken up residence on my couch at home. That said, I could not live without it.

    In my profession, Adobe pretty much dictates what software and hardware we need. Their products from 10 years ago do almost as much as their new offerings, but they make sure that they are not backwards compatible, and so I have to fork out more and more money so that I can open files made by kids with the latest pirated copy.

    I try not to complain though, as I am often reminded of a time where people forked out $5,000 for computers that had only a fraction of the power of today’s most basic mobile phone.

    #1109880
    Uncomplicating
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    yourvirtualboard, post: 122534 wrote:
    For me advice from an expert would be my first step and then I can make an informed choice. I’ve seen businesses spend $250K plus on ERP systems that don’t quite do what they want / expect but once installed it’s a little late to be finding out.

    I started my business because I saw far too many people act out of ignorance and spend big on things that simply weren’t necessary.

    All too common sadly.

    #1109881
    TehCamel
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    bluepenguin, post: 122564 wrote:
    I’ve had the same experience as JohnTranter with a tablet: I purchased it with the intention of using it as a sales tool, but it has now taken up residence on my couch at home. That said, I could not live without it.

    In my profession, Adobe pretty much dictates what software and hardware we need. Their products from 10 years ago do almost as much as their new offerings, but they make sure that they are not backwards compatible, and so I have to fork out more and more money so that I can open files made by kids with the latest pirated copy.

    I try not to complain though, as I am often reminded of a time where people forked out $5,000 for computers that had only a fraction of the power of today’s most basic mobile phone.

    consider looking at Adobe creative cloud ?
    http://www.adobe.com/au/products/creativecloud/faq.html

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