Home – New Forums Tech talk Joomla? Too intimidating for the non savvy?

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  • #1105876
    MatthewKeath
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    brayantangler, post: 0 wrote:
    I have observed that there is quantity of very fresh web designers out there who are unacquainted with their own disadvantages.Can you clarify what this means?

    brayantangler, post: 0 wrote:
    So you need to be an advised and discerning customer if you don’t want to get used.True for any industry. Do your home work so you can at least understand what the designer is talking about.

    However, I have clients who have read a couple of articles who think they know it all, and insist on it been done their way when it’s really the wrong approach. As a client you need to be open minded.

    The which CMS is best argument will continue till time eternal.

    Printerboy, post: 118367 wrote:
    Full Ecommerce platforms use:

    Magento (Not as easy to use as WordPress)Some. There are many options rather than Megento, and it costs $20,000 + to develop.

    The open source Megento is very limited which forces most users to the paid version.

    #1105877
    Anonymous
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    • Total posts: 11,464
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    Hi Matt,

    “Brayan” was a spammer, and has been banished now.

    Apologies for the inconvenience.

    Jayne

    #1105878
    alan.donaldson
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    • Total posts: 17
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    A lot of people like wordpress for their sites, because of the way it’s structured and how it is conceptualised. In WordPress, content is, generally speaking, either in the form of a post or a page — and that’s easy enough for people to grasp, hence it’s reputation for being user-friendly … mostly by those who’s site content fits within the concept of either a post or a page, and that is what you’re dealing with primarily. Which is probably about 90% of the sites out there.

    Joomla and Drupal both allow for that as well, but they have the ability to take things in a different direction, and allow you to conceptualize and architect your site as a series of “blocks” (and drupal literally calls them that). So instead of just looking at any given page as a list of posts, or as a grouping of site content as outlined in a template file … you have the ability to construct it as a series of “regions.” Each region of a page has a name, and the administrator has the ability to assign blocks of content to each region. They also have the ability to activate or deactivate certain regions for each page (i.e. home page has header, footer, spotlight, featured products, etc.) … and you have the ability to activate or deactivate regions very easily for each page fairly easily.

    In addition, you can assign different content to the various regions depending on the page: i.e. “On the about page, I want region B to have an image slideshow, while on the company history page, I want region B to have the external links menu, while on the contact page, I don’t want to use region B at all.”

    This is not to say that you don’t have this ability in WordPress. You absolutely do, but it’s just not set up as well for that kind of architecture. It would require more custom code in the template files, along with the creation of some custom content types … and/or the designation of categories or tags to determine where things might be placed on any given page. Either way, it’s just not the most intuitive way to work with WordPress — and that’s not a bug, but rather a feature. For my own purposes, the modular (or “page regions”) architecture works better for certain types of sites, and worse for others. On the plus side, it gives the site admin more granular control … but on the minus side, it can add to the complexity of the site for a less experienced user … or it can make it more complex than it needs to be for even the more experienced user.

    When the novice WordPress user asks “how do I create a custom home page?” … that’s a by-product of it’s less-modular architecture. And that might be the first question from a lot of people coming to wordpress from the world of joomla or drupal. On the flip-side … to those coming from WordPress to Joomla or Drupal, the first question they might ask is “I just want to know how to make a page. That’s all I want to do.” So in a lot of ways it really is 6 or one or half-dozen of the other … not all sites are the same, and no single tool is necessarily going to be the best for every possible job.

    #1105879
    thewpguy
    Member
    • Total posts: 12
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    Hi Andy,
    All CMS based websites come with a decent learning curve to do the things that you want to achieve. Joomla and Drupal for that matter are really amazing CMS platforms but require a bit more time to master than WordPress.

    I am biased to WordPress as I use it all of the time so I’m over the learning curve hump but you need to be aware that none of these options are going to solve you problem overnight.

    I think you might be wise to take your time as once you go down one path its a long way back to the fork in the road.

    Create a wordpress.com account it takes all of 5 minutes and have a look around in the back-end. You have nothing to lose.

    Regarding godaddy, they are ok for domain only hosting but not great for WordPress web hosting long term. I suggest asking around here before getting any webhosting as there are some that work best with each different CMS.

    Kind regards,
    Tony

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