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  • #995362
    nameunknown
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    Hi everyone

    I’ve had a staff member with me for several years now who handles my sales. We have never really set any form of KPI but we have managed to sail through with jobs closing on a regular basis.

    My skill set is ten times that of his, and it’s not an understatement and I pay myself the same as I pay him. I’ve been doing this so we can grow the business. But I’m starting to feel as though Im being taken for granted and the benefit of his skills are starting to wear thin.

    I’ve been reviewing everything of late and I’m starting to feel as though I’m doing all the work and he simply processes a few quotes here and there, reviews a few projects and checks off payments into our accounts system.

    My biggest gripe is that I work massive hours 4:30AM start to 9PM finish and he does a 40 hour week, I do all the interstate travel and wow all the clients we bid for, while he just fills in quotes from his remote office location.

    We were friends before I started this company which makes it hard. But as I feel I do 90% of the work and management and carry all the risk, what should I set as a KPI to be realistic.

    I’m looking for how to structure a KPI on a remote sales person so he can do his job and can potentially be rewarded for it, but on the same token actually make a success of it so I’m not doing all the work….

    And if that KPI isn’t met, how many chances do u give someone to live u to it?

    Thanks in advance

    #1201420
    Rohan@TD
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    Hi [USER=85046]@nameunknown[/USER],

    I think there are a few key issues worth examining. My quick thoughts:

    • Consider updating your employee’s expectations. In writing cover exactly what you expect from them. Your business has grown, and with that growth its needs (from employees) have changed. Clearly communicate them to your employees. Employees perform to a higher standard when they understand exactly what is required from them.
    • Issue smart goals. Provide further guidance on your expectations by developing SMART goals with your employees – Link them to your business goals and objectives to streamline performance. Goals have a range of benefits over KPIs. In particular they will increase commitment and allow you to improve their performance over time – rather than a single ‘shock’ KPI introduction approach.They should not only cover the sales expectations you have, but also their development. If your skill set is ’10 times his’, consider investing in his development to improve his performance. We have a SMART goals guide here, which may help.

    My biggest gripe is that I work massive hours 4:30AM start to 9PM finish and he does a 40 hour week,

    • There is nothing wrong with an employee doing 40 hours a week. This may be an unpopular opinion here, but it’s the truth. Unless you left something out of the above, there is no reason why they should be doing more hours as an employee. It’s your business, which is why you’re putting in more effort. Hours worked should never be a metric by which we assess performance. Instead focus on outcomes people produce. Goal setting will aid with this.
    • Don’t ignore the source of this. Reflect on how you got here. You have had an employee under perform for a while now. How did this happen in your business? How can you stop it from happening again? Why did it take so long to address? It will help improve your personal and business’s performance in the future. It very well be the employee is the issue, but it might not be
    • It’s important that business leaders treat remote staff like people who work in their office – as closely as possible. That includes knowing exactly what they are up to, what their priorities are etc. etc.

    Reach out if you want me to explain anything further. I hope I haven’t seemed to critical – which wasn’t my intention.

    #1201421
    bb1
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    I read this and I think to myself, are you just expecting unreasonable things from this person because you are working ridiculous hours yourself.

    Often the owner will go the extra mile, but forget that others are just an employee working what are reasonable hours. Gee what is wrong with them doing only 40 hours I ask.

    Also who sets the wages, I guess you as the business owner, so there is a simple solution to that part, pay yourself more. Again it is not this persons fault that you don’t pay yourself enough for the effort you put in.

    #1201422
    nameunknown
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    thanks for the replies, All taken on board. I guess I just feel that the performance level by this individual isn’t up to scratch, and needs a review. if not a review, possibly a new direction / replacement.

    I could quite possibly be unreasonable in my expectations, which is completely fair, but the business could have evolved so much I’ve been employing the wrong person for the last few years.

    Im going to take the points you outlined and have a good think about it properly

    many thanks

    #1201423
    Voetsek01
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    Hi Mate

    Just read your post and I feel your frustration. If you’d allow me to mention some resources that helped me through a couple of similar issues I had in the past.

    The first I’d look at is a site I found http://www.trueleaders.com.au and the guy I spoke to was really helpful and knowledgeable. He seems to be fairly young, around 35-40 I guess. But what I can say is that he is really helpful and knows where to find the info he is looking for. He didn’t charge me for the short consult which I thought was really good, maybe he’s building relationships or something. He did sort my issues out right there and then. I will hire him if there are issues that I have in the future that I can’t resolve with the resources on his site and I would pay for the services. Don’t know what he charges though, didn’t come up.

    The second is a company in the US called Entre Leadership, they do webinars and videos and things. Also really helpful.

    There are many leadership development sites around so take a look at those you have time for. I did find that many were psychologists and seemed to be kind of not in touch with what we needed and all they wanted was to do a bunch of surveys. I don’t understand that woo woo stuff, just call a spade a spade with me. But it’s up to you at the end of the day. So find someone you feel you can trust and have a good first chat with them. You do need to get along with them if this ends up being a long term investment for your company. Just my opinion and experience.

    Wish you all the best with finding the help you need

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