Home – New Forums Tech talk Mac v. PC – OK for business use?

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  • #1022421
    vxd
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    Change is always a great thing. If you have the money then go for it.

    I use both operating system daily and they are both as good as one another.

    As for the graphic design comments how Apple is better for graphics.

    Adobe creative suite are on both operating systems and they run the same on both OS. The most popular design and development suite out there.

    SO NO, They are both good for design and development.

    For heavy business use?
    Bookkeeping? Invoicing?
    There are really good project management and bookkeeping software and like the others have said there are always alternatives programs you can use if they haven’t got a Mac version.

    #1022422
    Chris Bates
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    Mat, post: 26477 wrote:
    Oh and anyone sitting there going “my Mac doesnt blue screen error” then you are correct. But enjoy that beachball spinning around while your system crashes.

    Ahahaha – I can honestly say in the 3 years I’ve been using my MacBook Pro, I’ve only ever crashed 2-3 times. They weren’t so much an issue of OS though, I just pushed the laptop well and beyond it’s hardware limitations, haha.

    The phrase “It just works” doesn’t really relate just to the stability and safety of OS X though. I will be happy to say W7 has come a long way in terms of stability and safety. It is as you say, malicious people target the popular system, THAT is why OS X is perceived as safe, people don’t often attack it.

    I think this will change though, they’re becoming more popular and many users have a false sense of security now.

    “It just works” means more to me the ease of use. Again, it’s a personal thing. I find OS X 100x easier. You may find W7 100x easier, it’s your call.

    #1022423
    tr3nton
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    davdee, post: 26446 wrote:
    I suppose the Windows v Mac argument could go on continuously….

    Ubuntu hasn’t got a mention yet ;)

    Anyway, in the end, it’s up to your personal preference, as you are the one that will be using it.. Anything you can do on one, you can do on the other – I personally don’t find either too difficult to use, with much of a learning curve, but that’s just me. Also, I think mac’s are over priced – given, they do have good hardware in them.

    It was also mentioned earlier on that you can install Windows in a Virtual Machine in your mac – if you intend on using windows software, i think this is rather pointless. Also, you will end up having to purchase another windows license (additional costs). Pick one, or forever hold your peace :)

    #1022424
    vxd
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    Chris Bates, post: 26487 wrote:
    Ahahaha – I can honestly say in the 3 years I’ve been using my MacBook Pro, I’ve only ever crashed 2-3 times. They weren’t so much an issue of OS though, I just pushed the laptop well and beyond it’s hardware limitations, haha.

    Chris Bates, post: 26442 wrote:
    The one downside to Mac’s isn’t the Mac itself. It’s the people that develop software for it.

    Funny thing is when there is a problem with an Apple fanboy’s product they always make up excuse or blame it on something else.
    Sorry Chris I’m not trying to offend you I’m just using your post as an example. I know many Apple Fanboys and they are continently making up excuses or blaming something else when something goes wrong with their MBP or Imac.

    For the 6 Years I’ve been using Mac os x I’ve only seen the beach ball spinning around once and for the 10 years I’ve been using Windows, I have never encountered the blue screen of death.

    I don’t think Ubuntu will sufficient for heavy duty business use.

    #1022425
    Chris Bates
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    BSODs are old, you only see them nowadays in the case of hardware faults. Or a SERIOUS OS error.

    If something crashes nowadays it’s mostly isolated to an application or two. The time you’re forced to physically reset a computer is normally due to impatience waiting for a computer to recover. No system is failure proof.

    There are cons to Macs, as there are cons to Windows, and cons to Ubuntu, etc etc.

    Really we’re just picking arguments at the moment. If the OP wants a more reasonable answer to his question, then he needs to elaborate on his business and it’s usage/tasks.

    #1022426
    mybusinesshelp
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    Well I have used both. Mac is great for design related things although so is a PC.

    If you are running general business, it is easier to use PC for many reasons. Yes Mac have compatible software but not the “real thing” which can frustrate you in time.

    I say PC.

    Amanda

    Louise Masters, post: 26408 wrote:
    I need to buy a new computer, So far I am a satisfied Toshiba laptop user and am now considering a Mac. Is anyone using Mac for heavy duty business use?
    #1022427
    CruzAccountant
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    I have a Macbook Air and it’s my favourite out of my computers. I mostly use it when I go out of the office because of it’s portability, sleek design and … well … because it’s a Mac.

    When I’m in the office, I revert back to the PC because my accounting software is made for PC.

    One option is installing Windows on the Mac. I use VM Ware Fusion and it works great with my accounting software. That’s about all I use Windows for on the Mac. I also have Office for Mac 2008 and I find it better than using Office 2007 on PC (which I’m not quite comfortable with yet). I much prefer Office 2003.

    #1022428
    Anonymous
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    Emroy, post: 26417 wrote:
    Louise,

    What industry are you in?

    There are certain industries that Mac would be a better option (Design for example) but I’ve used one for work in the past and to be honest, it was a nightmare. (It was a design job actually, but I was also the store manager, so I had a lot of other things to do than design on it)

    Perhaps it was just my unfamiliarity with it, but if I wanted to use a new program I had to find a mac version of it (some didn’t have mac versions).

    We are in IT professional services. I am in a sales and marketing management role.

    #1022429
    Chris Bates
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    What are your main tasks?

    CRM as an application, or web based?
    Office I’m guessing?
    Email?

    Worth look at the tasks you do, and what they’d be like on a Mac.

    #1022430
    jdyason
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    I’ve worked a lot with Macs, Windows & a combination of the two. The worst scenario is ending up with mixed platforms in a business environment. (Integrating Open Directory with Active directory looks simple – but is painful!). Think about the following questions:
    – What am I most familiar with
    – What support is available (technical support etc.)
    – How much money am I willing to spend
    – What software is available
    – Is my software available/compatible across platforms? (Windows & Mac etc.)
    – What do my clients use? Does it matter to them?

    Now in my opinion – Macs look great and are Brilliant for home use. They look great in front of clients. But will it be functional for your business use?

    Of course you could always go with virtualisation on the Mac – running Windows virtually on the Mac operating system. Or even Boot Camp to load Windows natively…

    That’s my thoughts…

    JAD

    #1022431
    STRich
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    I’m just going to say this – Windows 7 is everything the Mac had over the PC. With the added bonus of actually working in amongst everyone else in the world without having to convert this that and the other thing so they can view it.

    Also, MS Office 2007 is quite possibly the most amazing piece of software MS has ever ripped out from their behinds. I simply cannot work with any other word processing suite after it.
    FYI – I’ve seen our 400-odd userbase agree wholeheartedly when we migrated to it late last year.

    #1022432
    JohnSheppard
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    lol, windows 7 still comes with IE… *barf* it hasn’t got that over mac :)

    #1022433
    PerfectNotes-Kathy
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    As has been said, one of the ‘deciding factors’ is cost – Macs do seem to be expensive for the power that you get. The other issue is upgrades – almost everyone has a local cheap PC parts store where you can buy extra RAM and other parts and they know how to quickly and easily install the part(s) – this is not the case for Macs.
    Another thing – is it a laptop or a desktop? Will you be travelling with it by car? My partner has a Mac Book Pro, I have an HP laptop. When buying his lappy, we discovered that you can get a charger to let you recharge the Mac on a plane, but there is NO Apple car charger available….?

    Sometimes, it’s about the extras, not the core…

    HTH
    Kathy

    #1022434
    bigambition
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    Mat, post: 26477 wrote:
    The title of this thread is a bit decieving, if the question pertains to which one is ok for business use then the answer is simple, both. Despite the age old argument of which is better I think you need to look at a few factors and work out which one is best for your individual/business needs.

    I find businesses that have a communal computer are much better using PC for the reason that there wont be a transition for most users (nearly everyone can use PC’s but a limited amount of people can use a Mac).

    The next area would be to look at what your doing with the computer. As mentioned earlier if you are looking at using the computer for graphic design purposes then you might be leaning towards a Mac mainly due to the applications available and the speed of the Operating System.

    The last area I would look at is which appliocations you will need. Are they compatibable with each? Can you share files between Mac and PC using this application and have no problems. Do you have clients you need to share files with that have applications only available on either Mac or PC?

    As for the notion that Mac’s dont have problems with viruses well the issue is two pronged really. Most “bad users” aimming viruses/spyware/trojans etc normally target it at the bigger audience which is PC, hence the normal issue with these types of things. However, getting infected with these types of things normally happen because of people clicking on things they shouldnt, opening files/programs that are unreliable or installing what look like generic programs (ie skype, messenger) from dodgey websites. All in all I think the user has a lot more to do with their computer becomming infected than whether its a Mac or PC.

    Oh and anyone sitting there going “my Mac doesnt blue screen error” then you are correct. But enjoy that beachball spinning around while your system crashes.

    Mat has answered some of the basics regarding Macs and PCs for businesses and general use, but there is more to it.

    The only reason why people would go for a Mac is because they can afford the premium in the hardware, software and marketing for it, and this premium leads them to a “nicer” user experience.

    Its like buying an SUV instead of a station wagon for a courier business. Sure the SUV would be much nicer, may even feel safer but it will be at a $20K premium over an equivalent recent model Commodore. Then there’s the insurance, parts, consumable parts and services. It all adds up.

    Is the SUV better than a Commodore?

    Depends on the application.

    If I want to appeal to my clients then yes the SUV may be better.

    If I am concerned about my cost expenses that fuel consumption, on road services, depreciation, performance and handling for the daily road grind became major factors in the running of my business then I would definitely go for a much cheaper alternative.

    It makes business sense.

    With that said, this is the reason why most people choose to go PC instead of the Mac because they do the exact same job at a more affordable cost!

    There is no reason for a graphic designer to choose an Apple over a PC other than the branding and culture associated with it. Most of the current 3D games you see were all created on computers other than a Mac anyway, and this lead to the PC being the better gaming platform. Strange I know but the depth of what PCs can do these days is astonishing.

    They say PCs are not as safe and are more vulnerable to viruses than a Mac. Actually it could go either way. PC users makes up a far larger part of the pie chart compared to Mac users, obviously there are far more activities developed in the PC community than any other, you are bound to meet some bad apples (no puns intended). Crucially, Microsoft used to be crippled with lawsuits following lawsuits with the features they were putting on Windows. If they had a built-in anti-virus software in Windows this will effectively push the competition out of business, just as Internet Explorer once did to Netscape. Apple had no such problems because they had their own hardware to support their software on so they had complete monopoly. Competition is what makes products better, the PC platform had a lot of it which benefitted the community, Apple has less of it (other than PCs themselves) which benefitted them! Of course Microsoft wanted to do the same, basically corporate greed at their best.

    Also important to note is that Apple has an equally poor record of virus attacks on their former and current operating systems including the iPhone due to their increasing inclufences as emerging products. Again, it comes to user base, the bigger it gets the more problems you can expect. OSX do crashes sometimes, they just don’t have a famous screen to represent that other than an icon change that would spin forever and you will need to do a hard boot anyway.

    Luckily its not about the hardware or the software you use, its how you use them that you should be most concerned about.

    You can run a business virus free, problem free on PCs if the correct practice of usage is applied. I have used PCs for over 20 years, I didn’t start using anti-virus software until I got my notebook in 2008 which came with one and even I would turn it off sometimes due to its tendence to run in the background unncessarily. Of course, I can do that because I know what I’m doing, I don’t download something from sources I don’t trust. I don’t visit porn or money making websites.

    And because I know the components of my PC, I also know their strengths and limits. I know that if I needed a system to perform 1080p rendering then I don’t have to buy a completely new computer for that, it will just be change of graphic cards, upgraded RAM and maybe a CPU if I was really concerned about completing the job in 5 minutes instead of 15.

    In spite of their wholesome “one stop solution” outlook, Apple systems may not always perform to your expectations, and buying a new replacement is a terribly expensive way of finding that out.

    However, if you have the means to justify the premium of buying more expensive products, then by all means go for it. Just be prepared to spend more for everything including upgrades.

    #1022435
    siringo
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    john.sheppard, post: 26452 wrote:
    IMO, Stick to what you know, if you know PC’s, use them, if you know Mac’s, use them. The cost to relearn and muck around with software compatabilities far outweighs any productivity gain you might get.

    I’m also of the opinion that if you plan to grow…stick to PC’s…you’ll have to retrain all your staff and that’s rather expensive….I’d say this is why you don’t see any organisations using Mac only across the board.

    My personal choice (which is entirely irrelevant) is the PC camp because all my software runs on PC, I know how to fix it, and I know how not to break it….plus any apple software I’ve ever tried (itunes) has made me want to kill myself……Also mac’s only have one button…PC’s have two….that means twice the efficiency :P

    Besides all that, things change, while it doesn’t appear to be the case any time in the near future, Microsoft may one day wake up from their “Everyone uses Microsoft” slumber…so just stick to what you know until you are forced to change :)

    Yes, BRAVO, I couldn’t have put it better. I don’t mind what anyone uses (Windows, Linux, Mac), but I think if you have to spend time learning to use a new tool to do what you can already do with an existing tool then that is not a wise decision.

    I spent 6 months using Linux and loved it. But I went back to Windows as I found over time that useful little knick knack programs that I wanted to use would only run on Windows.

    The school my kids go to are migrating from Windows to Macs which is something I find completely staggering. I’ve worked in IT support since ’83 and the number of businesses I’ve run into that use Macs can be counted on 1 hand. In my opinion the school is doing my kids a disservice.

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