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  • #973063
    ExecAccess
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    Hi All
    A couple of forum threads over the Easter break (did someone say break?? LOL) have given me food for thought. Particularly how to make our Adwords campaign more cost effective. We are breaking even on the campaign, but need to move this into a positive ROI (thanks Captain Simmo if you are reading for making me examine this).

    One of the things I am looking at is removing key words from my campaigns where we are now ranking organically on the first page. But I am a bit scared of doing this in case it:

    a. effects the organic ranking (but I don’t think it should)
    b. effects any other keywords showing up on the sponsored links.

    For example, I just searched on Bow Ties and we were #6 on Google, and our Adwords ad also appeared at position # 7 in the right-hand side sponsored links. So if I make “bow ties” a negative keyword obviously the ad would no longer appear, but would Google (eventually) penalise us because we were no longer running an ad containing “bow ties” or is it purely our on-site SEO and backlinks etc that gives us our #6 organic ranking?

    And if we make “bow ties” a negative keyword, will it effect other searches that contain the word “tie” or “ties”, eg “wedding ties” or “silk tie”.

    I am also thinking to improve our return on investment, then using Adwords for the higher ticket items is a better plan, ie a bow tie retails for $35-$40 while a silk tie might retail for $75, and a leather briefcase might retail for $299.

    Does that sound like a good strategy? Would love your thoughts.

    #1059526
    Netboost SEO
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    organic search rankings are separate from adwords.

    It is your site’s content and possibly backlinks that cause your page to rank at number 6

    Adding the negative keyword means that you do not wish your ad to show up for queries containing that word – i.e. you may not sell bow ties, you may find that people wanting bow ties are cheap, or you may just think they are silly…

    You won’t be penalised in any manner for using that negative keyword. Your ad rankings are determined by your max cost per click factored against your quality score – a measure of your ad’s click through rate.

    With adwords it is essential to be smart about keywords. Don’t just go for every possible semi-relevant keyword as that will cost you money by lowering your quality score.

    Also I get the feeling that you may not be running your adwords campaign nearly as efficiently as possible. Have you looked at conversion rate optimization? Do you manually adjust your maximum cpc bid to minimise costs? Do you split test ads and their copy?

    Adwords management is a bit of a science and relies on testing, testing and more testing (as well as good instincts on consumer psychology)

    #1059527
    ExecAccess
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    Netboost SEO, post: 73434 wrote:
    organic search rankings are separate from adwords.

    It is your site’s content and possibly backlinks that cause your page to rank at number 6

    Adding the negative keyword means that you do not wish your ad to show up for queries containing that word – i.e. you may not sell bow ties, you may find that people wanting bow ties are cheap, or you may just think they are silly…

    You won’t be penalised in any manner for using that negative keyword. Your ad rankings are determined by your max cost per click factored against your quality score – a measure of your ad’s click through rate.

    With adwords it is essential to be smart about keywords. Don’t just go for every possible semi-relevant keyword as that will cost you money by lowering your quality score.

    Also I get the feeling that you may not be running your adwords campaign nearly as efficiently as possible. Have you looked at conversion rate optimization? Do you manually adjust your maximum cpc bid to minimise costs? Do you split test ads and their copy?

    Adwords management is a bit of a science and relies on testing, testing and more testing (as well as good instincts on consumer psychology)

    Thank you for your comments. You are right we are probably not running our campaign as efficiently or cost-effectively as possible. It is a huge learning curve and I guess we are learning as we go. So any advice is more than welcome.

    We have been manually adjusting the maximum bid, little by little. I guess I am just not sure how low to go. We are currently bidding 50c on most things and paying about 40c.

    I haven’t tried split testing….must find out more about that one!

    Good to know adding a negative keyword won’t also effect our organic rankings. I know they are not supposed to be connected, but Google is a weird and wonderful “being” and you never quite know.

    Going back to the “bow tie” example, I guess my main concern was if I make “bow tie” and “bow ties” a negative keyword, will this effect any other keywords that contain the word “tie” or “ties”, ie “wedding ties”, “mens ties”.

    Thanks again.

    #1059528
    Aidan
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    Hi Wendy,

    100% no effect on your organic rankings – if there was a connection everyone would buy AdWords to improve their organic results!

    You can negative out the EXACT matches for ‘bow ties’ if you like, meaning folks searching for ‘bow ties’ won’t see your ads, though those searching for ‘neckwear’, ‘novelty bow ties’ or some other term might, if you have broad match keywords in your account by default?

    You can exclude the exact term by placing square brackets around the negative keyword i.e. [bow ties] if that is what you are trying to do, or you can exclude the phrase matched terms by putting quote marks around it i.e. “bow ties” (which would stop ads showing for ‘novelty bow ties’ as well as ‘bow ties’)

    I’m assuming you have looked at the search terms used to find your site in a Search Query report (or its onscreen version) and NOT at the keywords you have selected for your ads?

    Hit me up if you need more… :)

    #1059529
    Tony Pfitzner
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    ExecAccess, post: 73423 wrote:
    Hi All

    One of the things I am looking at is removing key words from my campaigns where we are now ranking organically on the first page. But I am a bit scared of doing this in case it:

    a. effects the organic ranking (but I don’t think it should)
    b. effects any other keywords showing up on the sponsored links.

    Hi Wendy

    I agree with Aidan – there will be no effect.

    However, strategically I would not be removing those ads just because you are on the first page – PROVIDED they are giving you some sort of ROI.
    (If you can’t afford to do this it is highly probable that you are losing money on the rest of your Adwords campaign. )
    If you are on the first page of organic results it is likely that these keywords have a high quality score and they are where you should be focusing your attention – definitely not switching them off.

    Shoot for world domination on BOTH ads and organic search where you rank well! Play to your strengths.

    Finally make sure the Quality Score column is turned on in your Keywords report/management interface in your Adwords account, and find out how to use it.

    Regards

    Tony

    #1059530
    ExecAccess
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    Thank you Aidan and Tony. You have both given me food for thought. I need to do more homework :)

    #1059531
    kylehoward
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    It will definitely not affect your organic results at all. And, I definitely recommend you experiment with negative keywords. Obviously you don’t just want as many visitors as possible, you want them to be buyers! So try to filter out everyone who isn’t going to click the buy button.

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