Home – New Forums New here? Share your story Negotiating your best outcome is hard

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #978738
    BondNegotiators
    Member
    • Total posts: 8
    Up
    0
    ::

    There is one aspect of business, management, leadership and entrepreneurism which is never discussed – that happens to be Negotiation.
    Yet success in life and business depend upon it.
    We all think we negotiate expertly, yet this premise itself will be the biggest obstacle to negotiating your best outcome.

    We’ve saved people precious time, days of emotionally agonising turmoil and money, by guiding them in their negotiation, and we do it in a spirit of learning and strategising, so clients can face every subsequent negotiation.

    We work with sales teams facing big clients, we help people get out of legal disputes at about 20% of the cost of using a lawyer to do the same thing, and we get better solutions.

    We want to work with people who see the need to be able to negotiate in every situation, wisely and with a deep awareness of all that is happening. We’ll show you why your people’s approach will always get inferior results.

    We know we cannot prepare you for every situation that arises, but we can show you a way to assess and strategise in every situation that arises.

    Bond National
    Negotiating for best outcomes
    http://www.bondnational.com.au

    #1109164
    Geronimo
    Participant
    • Total posts: 237
    Up
    0
    ::

    Welcome on board Peter. When I saw the topic, I thought it was someone asking for negotiation advice, and was going to recommend a great book, “Getting to Yes” from the Harvard Negotiating project. After reading your post, I had a flick over your website, only to see that you’ve actually done the course. Great to have you around! I’m sure your knowledge and insight will be of value to us all.

    #1109165
    Anonymous
    Guest
    • Total posts: 11,464
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi BondNegotiators (- is it Peter?),

    Welcome to Flying Solo and thanks for introducing yourself and your business to us.

    That sounds like a really valuable service you offer there – and very rewarding work for you too :)

    Nice to meet you,
    Jayne

    #1109166
    MatthewKeath
    Member
    • Total posts: 3,184
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Peter, and welcome to Flying Solo.

    Learning how to negotiate is a skill that every small business needs, otherwise you will find that you end up doing more work with less money.

    At some point in every business, there is a dispute. A lot of small business simply give in to whatever demand are made on them, no matter how crazy and how much time and money is costs them.

    Learning how to negotiate can help you get out of these situations with your dignity intact, boost your confidence, and increase your respect with the warring party.

    I look forward to reading more of your posts.

    Cheers,

    Matt

    #1109167
    BondNegotiators
    Member
    • Total posts: 8
    Up
    0
    ::
    Geronimo, post: 121406 wrote:
    Welcome on board Peter. When I saw the topic, I thought it was someone asking for negotiation advice, and was going to recommend a great book, “Getting to Yes” from the Harvard Negotiating project. After reading your post, I had a flick over your website, only to see that you’ve actually done the course. Great to have you around! I’m sure your knowledge and insight will be of value to us all.

    Thank you for your efforts to recommend this outstanding book.
    Roger Fisher is the field luminary and has contributed such insights through this book and so many other books, academic studies and real world contributions.

    I appreciate your interest in the field. It is vast, interesting and in my view, is the key to much of what happens to us an evolving people.

    #1109168
    BondNegotiators
    Member
    • Total posts: 8
    Up
    0
    ::
    FS Concierge, post: 121427 wrote:
    Hi BondNegotiators (- is it Peter?),

    Welcome to Flying Solo and thanks for introducing yourself and your business to us.

    That sounds like a really valuable service you offer there – and very rewarding work for you too :)

    Nice to meet you,
    Jayne

    Thank you Jayne
    It is indeed rewarding work.
    Allowing people to have full knowledge to make conscious choices is strategic, creative and allows people to be fully in control of their choices, thereby making the business world a far more effective abundant and hopefully harmonious place.

    #1109169
    BondNegotiators
    Member
    • Total posts: 8
    Up
    0
    ::
    MatthewKeath, post: 121446 wrote:
    Hi Peter, and welcome to Flying Solo.

    Learning how to negotiate is a skill that every small business needs, otherwise you will find that you end up doing more work with less money.

    At some point in every business, there is a dispute. A lot of small business simply give in to whatever demand are made on them, no matter how crazy and how much time and money is costs them.

    Learning how to negotiate can help you get out of these situations with your dignity intact, boost your confidence, and increase your respect with the warring party.

    I look forward to reading more of your posts.

    Cheers,

    Matt

    Hi Matt

    You raise great points in your response. Thank you for your comments.
    I maintain that we (as people) do not negotiate well, because the basis upon which we negotiate is from an adversarial perspective. This is simply the wrong approach and mindset.
    And when people are in disputes, it is almost impossible to extract oneself from becoming entrenched in deeper conflict – demonisation of the other side, victim mentality and looking to “fix the other side”, to get the best outcome for a specific situation.
    In addition to small business disputes, there are opportunities to create optimum results and outcomes in almost every situation a small business faces, but we disempower ourselves from taking the path.
    The approach is not easy. As a negotiator, I will always call upon one of my negotiation mentors to confirm that I am not operating on auto-pilot and missing real opportunities.
    This is a field for the future and will be recognised, but will give measurable results for each transaction.
    When my clients measure their outcomes in saved time (up to a year freed up) not having to fight a court battle, half-million dollar negotiated gains or better supplier contracts, they understand the benefit of Bond National.
    Regards
    Peter
    http://www.bondnational.com.au

    #1109170
    David@Verve Recruitment
    Member
    • Total posts: 247
    Up
    0
    ::

    Perhaps I should learn not to comment, however until then…

    I’m not questioning the importance of negotiation, or your ability at the process, however I do object to the assertation that negotiation is always the prefered method of doing business. Sure, I’m adept at haggling, and to an extent I enjoy the process, but at the same time i’d much rather be offered (and offer) a service / product that I find it hard to say no to in the first place.

    Negotiation seems to me a process to reduce an over priced product / service to (at best) a well priced service.

    To make things easier for our clients, and ourselves, we offer what we feel is the best value service of its kind in Australia, in the first instance. No need for haggling. We’re open to offers, but they’d have to be exceptionally good for us to improve on our initial offering which we’ve offered in the first instance in order to be shockingly good. In effect we can’t justify haggling because we’ve already offered the best deal in Australia.

    Dump haggling. Deal with the best service providers. Support them and get the best ongoing service you could desire. Seems the best way to me.

    Also, and I don’t wish to be mean, but it does stike me that that’s the general direction of the economy – both consumer and corporate. People want to be offered the best deal upfront, and will simply say no to over-priced offerings, and thereby choose not to enter into any negotiation process.

    We’re busy. Give us the best deal, or goodbye.

    #1109171
    MatthewKeath
    Member
    • Total posts: 3,184
    Up
    0
    ::
    David@Verve Recruitment, post: 121823 wrote:
    Perhaps I should learn not to comment, however until then…

    I’m not questioning the importance of negotiation, or your ability at the process, however I do object to the assertation that negotiation is always the prefered method of doing business. Sure, I’m adept at haggling, and to an extent I enjoy the process, but at the same time i’d much rather be offered (and offer) a service / product that I find it hard to say no to in the first place.

    Negotiation seems to me a process to reduce an over priced product / service to (at best) a well priced service.

    To make things easier for our clients, and ourselves, we offer what we feel is the best value service of its kind in Australia, in the first instance. No need for haggling. We’re open to offers, but they’d have to be exceptionally good for us to improve on our initial offering which we’ve offered in the first instance in order to be shockingly good. In effect we can’t justify haggling because we’ve already offered the best deal in Australia.

    Dump haggling. Deal with the best service providers. Support them and get the best ongoing service you could desire. Seems the best way to me.

    Also, and I don’t wish to be mean, but it does stike me that that’s the general direction of the economy – both consumer and corporate. People want to be offered the best deal upfront, and will simply say no to over-priced offerings, and thereby choose not to enter into any negotiation process.

    We’re busy. Give us the best deal, or goodbye.I don’t think he mentioned ‘haggling’ for the service / product price. There are a lot of other situations where negotiation skills are important. The price is the price.

    Best value is a fluid concept, and should never be confused with the cheapest. Especially is the service entry. People who think good value mean cheap, and I have had a few Clint’s like that, are more than welcome to go with the cheap price. You get what you pay for.

    #1109172
    David@Verve Recruitment
    Member
    • Total posts: 247
    Up
    0
    ::
    MatthewKeath, post: 121843 wrote:
    I don’t think he mentioned ‘haggling’ for the service / product price. There are a lot of other situations where negotiation skills are important. The price is the price.

    Best value is a fluid concept, and should never be confused with the cheapest. Especially is the service entry. People who think good value mean cheap, and I have had a few Clint’s like that, are more than welcome to go with the cheap price. You get what you pay for.

    Value is determined by a number of factors, and is of course subjective. But let’s not kid ourselves, price is a huge determinant of value.

    You get what you pay for is generally true, but not entirely so.

    Companies in all industries face competition and some will be more competitive than others, and they won’t necessarily have inferior products or services.

    #1109173
    BondNegotiators
    Member
    • Total posts: 8
    Up
    0
    ::
    David@Verve Recruitment, post: 121823 wrote:
    Perhaps I should learn not to comment, however until then…

    I’m not questioning the importance of negotiation, or your ability at the process, however I do object to the assertation that negotiation is always the prefered method of doing business. Sure, I’m adept at haggling, and to an extent I enjoy the process, but at the same time i’d much rather be offered (and offer) a service / product that I find it hard to say no to in the first place.

    Negotiation seems to me a process to reduce an over priced product / service to (at best) a well priced service.

    To make things easier for our clients, and ourselves, we offer what we feel is the best value service of its kind in Australia, in the first instance. No need for haggling. We’re open to offers, but they’d have to be exceptionally good for us to improve on our initial offering which we’ve offered in the first instance in order to be shockingly good. In effect we can’t justify haggling because we’ve already offered the best deal in Australia.

    Dump haggling. Deal with the best service providers. Support them and get the best ongoing service you could desire. Seems the best way to me.

    Also, and I don’t wish to be mean, but it does stike me that that’s the general direction of the economy – both consumer and corporate. People want to be offered the best deal upfront, and will simply say no to over-priced offerings, and thereby choose not to enter into any negotiation process.

    We’re busy. Give us the best deal, or goodbye.

    Hi David

    Your comments and engagement are very welcome.
    The day we stop offering perspective is the day we’re willing to accept less than ‘best outcome’.

    I would like to put some concepts forward for your consideration.

    Negotiation, as Bond National sees it, is a process by which people enter into discussion, consider options and then determine which solution they will pursue together, or if one is not found, just go in their separate ways.

    You may therefore infer from this view, and correctly, that people negotiate almost as much as they communicate.

    People are programmed to negotiate in an adversarial mode and as such, have no way of coming near best outcome. We will always leave unrealised value on the table. To build most value in any negotiation, you have to operate in a problem solving mode, the opposite of our default, adversarial manner.

    Doing this is not an easy task.
    You need to train your own mind into breaking with auto-pilot mode and thinking this way (in the heat of a moment). then you have to attempt to influence your counterpart to think this way.

    That is what we offer at Bond National.
    We have a method (All Things Considered) and interventions which our clients use and only then, attempt to bring their counterpart into problem solving mode.

    That in my view, is why BOND NATIONAL are busy helping people.

    You state that
    “we offer what we feel is the best value service of its kind in Australia, in the first instance. No need for haggling. We’re open to offers, but they’d have to be exceptionally good for us to improve on our initial offering which we’ve offered in the first instance in order to be shockingly good”

    2 questions arise for me, when taking the above approach, if Verve were a BOND NATIONAL client :

    a) Is it possible that there could be clients, who do accept your deals, who just might perceive more value in the services you are offering than that which they are paying for ? (i.e. could more value be built in the deals you’re doing?)
    b) What is it, that those clients who haggle over price, are not seeing in your service offering ? (i.e. what is it that you have not fully understood about them – again, to build more value?)

    Both of these questions can only be answered with a problem solving approach to negotiation.
    For as long as people operate in the competitive and 1-dimensional ‘haggling’ framework, they will leave value which they could have uncovered, in a negotiation.

    Being in a negotiation which you are yet aware of is the worst situation. This also happens to many people.

    When you say, customers state :
    “We’re busy. Give us the best deal, or goodbye.”
    I hope you see that your client is already engaging you in negotiation.
    Right at that moment, you’re in it.
    Unless you’re ready at these moments – and there’ll be many – you may be parting with earnings, unwittingly.

    I like WIlliam Ury’s quote
    “I believe there is a negotiation revolution taking place. Negotiation is fast becoming the pre-eminent form of reaching decisions in the world: it is crucial that we become more creative, acknowledging the paradox that the best way to be competitive in the world is to be co-operative.” – William Ury, co-author of Getting to Yes, The Third Side, and the Power of a Positive No.

    Please keep the dialogue going, if you find it may be of benefit to Verve.
    I love helping people get better outcomes – I hate seeing them miss out on something they did not have to miss out on.

    David, I am very interested to understand why you believe Verve has
    ” the best value service of its kind in Australia”.

    regards
    Peter
    BOND NATIONAL

    #1109174
    Shaukat Adam Khalid
    Participant
    • Total posts: 1,528
    Up
    0
    ::

    negotiation isn’t always about price. Often, it’s about terms and conditions and that’s where the greatest leverage lies.

    Here’s an extreme example. What if you were negotiating on an investment property and the seller didn’t want to budge on the price but was happy to offer an option that could be exercised within 5 years?

    if you knew that the price was going to go up 30% in the next 3 years, the price now sounds like a good deal. you could flip it for a profit before settling on it.

    or how about negotiating the lease on a medical centre that only operated business hours? What if you could secure the right to sublease at the same price? you organise two sub leases. one for a day clinic and the other for a night clinic. you’ve just doubled your revenue.

    I’ve really enjoyed studying the works of conrad levinson, roger dawson, gerry spence, david saunders and the likes. turned out be really useful during my time in real estate as a fresh uni graduate with very little sales experience.

    #1109175
    Rico
    Member
    • Total posts: 137
    Up
    0
    ::

    I just want to share my experience working with Peter across the weekend.

    Reading this thread I decided to contact him regarding some business to business contractual issue. Basically I needed some help to set up a collaboration with a multinational company so to become a main supplier for their new Australian enterprise.
    Of course this US based company was using all their contractual power to try to get the best deal out of me. The price was not the only element in the discussion but also line of credit, insurance requirements, stock levels, shipping times, etc.
    A key element was the timing. I needed to find the right strategy, and I needed to do it fast, before today’s meeting.

    I contacted Peter on Friday afternoon for the first time, and we worked together at very odd hours across the weekend, and we managed to have everything in order by this morning (Monday).

    Thanks Peter, a great experience and some good lesson to remember!

    Rico

    #1109176
    BondNegotiators
    Member
    • Total posts: 8
    Up
    0
    ::
    Khalid Adam, post: 121920 wrote:
    negotiation isn’t always about price. Often, it’s about terms and conditions and that’s where the greatest leverage lies.

    Here’s an extreme example. What if you were negotiating on an investment property and the seller didn’t want to budge on the price but was happy to offer an option that could be exercised within 5 years?

    if you knew that the price was going to go up 30% in the next 3 years, the price now sounds like a good deal. you could flip it for a profit before settling on it.

    or how about negotiating the lease on a medical centre that only operated business hours? What if you could secure the right to sublease at the same price? you organise two sub leases. one for a day clinic and the other for a night clinic. you’ve just doubled your revenue.

    I’ve really enjoyed studying the works of conrad levinson, roger dawson, gerry spence, david saunders and the likes. turned out be really useful during my time in real estate as a fresh uni graduate with very little sales experience.

    G’day Khalid

    Your examples are great stories of thinking beyond a linear approach to negotiating. And I thank you for the references. I love reading and will check out Levinson, Spence and Saunders.

    Are you still in real Estate ?

    regards
    Peter

    #1109177
    Anonymous
    Guest
    • Total posts: 11,464
    Up
    0
    ::

    Thanks for sharing your story with us Rico, and I hope all your discussions with the US business went well.

    And congratulations Peter on receiving such a glowing recommendation :)

    Love your work,
    Jayne

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.