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  • #990926
    JaycKay
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    Hi Guys,
    We are a small business in Australia and growing fast.

    We are looking to venture into the US but I need to make it a little more user friendly for them to contact us. At the moment we receive a lot of Australian calls but none from the US , rather a lot of emails that we struggle to convert to sales.
    Currently we have our Australian number on our Website and seems to confuse people over in the states who don’t know how to dial international numbers. Yes its true.

    So my question is, what is the best system to put into place to make this easier for our customers in the US to contact us and make them feel like we arent a million miles away.

    I have heard that I can get VOIP which allows us to obtain a US number and get the calls diverted to our number. Has anyone had any experience or has been in this situation?

    Is there an internationally recognised number or should I be considering 1300 or 1800 numbers? I want to try and bypass the international dialing code and I dont mind paying for the calls made to us.

    We are also looking to add a introduction message to our phone system so any advice regarding a service that can do all of this together would be greatly appreciated.

    Sorry for all the questions and thanks upfront for any advice.

    Jason

    #1179160
    Dave Gillen – Former FS Concierge
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    Hi Jason,

    Welcome to Flying Solo!

    Good luck with the phone situation – hopefully some of our members have used a similar service. It certainly seems like having a US number and diverting it seems to be the go.

    Great to have you here. :)

    Dave

    #1179161
    mylesagnew
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    Currently we have our Australian number on our Website and seems to confuse people over in the states who don’t know how to dial international numbers. Yes its true.

    Skype has a business service Skype Connect you can get a number from them in any country (I have 3 numbers in various countries. For both inbound and outbound calling)

    List of phone systems compatible with Skype Connect:
    (Any IP PBX that support’s SIP should connect)

    • 3CX
    • Avaya
    • Cisco
    • Freetalk
    • Grandstream
    • LG Ericsson
    • NEC
    • ShoreTel
    • Siemens
    • SIPfoundry

    If you currently have phone system call your supplier and ask them is module to connect to IP telephone systems.

    #1179162
    Gizmo
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    Hello Jason,

    MondoTalk can certainly help and with out global coverage we can certainly help connecting clients easily to you.

    The Cloud PBX service my team and I developed is a great fit for your needs.
    Here is a link for you:
    http://business.mondotalk.com/phone-systems/mondotalk-phone-system/

    If you are still looking please let me know via a PM.

    #1179163
    MichaelDigital
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    All good suggestions, you could also get a Twilio number that has international reach – so you rent a kind of voip number and this can be called from anywhere globally – you can also integrate SMS messaging to customers, which actually has a far higher open rate than email, for continued marketing – the Twilio system can be plugged into ‘openvbx’, i operate this system and it enables considerable communications applications.

    #1179164
    Gizmo
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    MondoTalk has a similar range of API’s if you are looking to make Twilio type integration with your own application or connect it to your own PBX.

    Twilio is a good solution if you are located in the US. However for Australia its not that good due to the potential delays in the voice. This is because media/voice is a real time communication and having media bounce out of the use is not what I would consider business quality.

    I’m saying the above based on experience as we have ex twilio customers with who were experiencing poor audio and voice dela this issue which MondoTalk solved.

    So if you are looking for Twilio type integration for voice, sms and more please consider the Australian alternative designed to have business grade not just locally but globally too, MondoTalk.

    #1179165
    MichaelDigital
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    Gizmo, post: 211135 wrote:
    MondoTalk has a similar range of API’s if you are looking to make Twilio type integration with your own application or connect it to your own PBX.

    Twilio is a good solution if you are located in the US. However for Australia its not that good due to the potential delays in the voice. This is because media/voice is a real time communication and having media bounce out of the use is not what I would consider business quality.

    I’m saying the above based on experience as we have ex twilio customers with who were experiencing poor audio and voice dela this issue which MondoTalk solved.

    So if you are looking for Twilio type integration for voice, sms and more please consider the Australian alternative designed to have business grade not just locally but globally too, MondoTalk.

    I appreciate that you are promoting – but that is quite frankly untrue, Twilio operates in Australia also, digital voice data travels at the speed of light – you are not going to detect any delays any more than in any VOIP system , which of course is vulnerable to internet bottlenecks, which accounts for occasional dropouts in any VoIP-based system – it is commonly experienced. My system which resides on Amazon servers is actually very good, and equals anything offered – I support quite a few clients on it .

    #1179166
    Gizmo
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    MichaelDigital, post: 211143 wrote:
    I appreciate that you are promoting – but that is quite frankly untrue, Twilio operates in Australia also, digital voice data travels at the speed of light – you are not going to detect any delays any more than in any VOIP system , which of course is vulnerable to internet bottlenecks, which accounts for occasional dropouts in any VoIP-based system – it is commonly experienced. My system which resides on Amazon servers is actually very good, and equals anything offered – I support quite a few clients on it .

    Sorry if that upset you.
    Its what I have found from experience, i.e. customers who were on Twilio and moved over to MondoTalk.

    Please also check your facts, the Internet (digial voice data) does not operate at the speed of light.

    #1179167
    TehCamel
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    MichaelDigital, post: 211143 wrote:
    digital voice data travels at the speed of light
    Actually, no. A more correct term would be “speed of wire” – naturally, it depends on the inter-connects betwen the IP phone and the SIP endpoint.

    Quote:
    – you are not going to detect any delays any more than in any VOIP system ,
    While you may not necessarily “hear” a delay – the voice service is still packaged up in TCP and/or UDP so it’s still subject to the same requisite delay that any other TCP/UDP packet is subject to on an local or wide area network.
    It’s quite simple. If I run a ping between my local connection and mondotalk’s SIP server based here, and the same ping between here and Twilio’s US SIP endpoint, there will be a difference in response time (or delay, which is what ICMP measures)
    So, naturally, yes – there is most definitely a communication delay that occurs when one end-point is located further away than another. Whether it’s enough to notice in the speech, is a different matter.

    Quote:
    which of course is vulnerable to internet bottlenecks, which accounts for occasional dropouts in any VoIP-based system – it is commonly experienced.
    Well, yes, of course. All VOIP services are vulnerable to bottlenecks (or QoS) as it’s all constrained by the lower layers on the stack. Doesn’t really matter how to try to spin it – bottlenecks or something else.
    Regardless – the same internet connection at my end-point, suffering congestion, will still experience better performance to a local server than an international server (unless of course, the congestion is close to the server node, rather than close to me.)

    Quote:
    My system which resides on Amazon servers is actually very good, and equals anything offered – I support quite a few clients on it .
    Yep, which Amazon servers? I’d be interested to spin up a couple of identical EC2 instances in the SEA region and also in the US East and US West region and actually run traceroutes and ping tests but I’m almost certain that you’d see slower response times to USW and USE than SEA.
    #1179168
    Gizmo
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    TehCamel, post: 211148 wrote:
    So, naturally, yes – there is most definitely a communication delay that occurs when one end-point is located further away than another. Whether it’s enough to notice in the speech, is a different matter.

    Correct. Also I can assure you that you can hear the difference.
    That is the whole reason I put a global network in place, to remove that delay and create business quality calls.

    TehCamel, post: 211148 wrote:
    Well, yes, of course. All VOIP services are vulnerable to bottlenecks (or QoS) as it’s all constrained by the lower layers on the stack. Doesn’t really matter how to try to spin it – bottlenecks or something else.
    Regardless – the same internet connection at my end-point, suffering congestion, will still experience better performance to a local server than an international server (unless of course, the congestion is close to the server node, rather than close to me.)

    You know your stuff :)
    But to add to it if I may. The more hops there are between the two end points in a VoIP communication, the more likely you will have issues. That is because every hop has the possibility to introduce jitter or packet loss.
    As soon as jitter or packetloss is incurred it no longer matters how far away the server is. At that point the quality has most likely been impacted. Having a close server only minimize the chance of more packet loss or jitter.
    But must importantly have a closer server node if designed right will reduce the latency, i.e. a delay in your phone call conversation.
    I understand this importance and because of this the network I put in place is designed to reduce the chances of packetloss and jitter, while at the same time ensuring that the two people talking do not hear a delay in their conversation.

    TehCamel, post: 211148 wrote:
    Yep, which Amazon servers? I’d be interested to spin up a couple of identical EC2 instances in the SEA region and also in the US East and US West region and actually run traceroutes and ping tests but I’m almost certain that you’d see slower response times to USW and USE than SEA.

    Let me know how this test goes.
    My guess is you will see about 250ms to US servers and about 100ms to SEA severs.
    if you decide to test voip over it I can tell you that you will hear the difference as a longer delay in the conversation, well I could when I did similar tests.

    #1179169
    MichaelDigital
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    The Amazon global network, as you may know, has regional access nodes, the one servicing Australia is the Sydney based one – this is what makes AWS services so efficient, fast and scalable – not to mention very economical – voice data is digitally identical with any other data. You will always experience variations in the throughput in accordance with the infrastructure, backbone e.t.c
    the variations in actual user experience is going to minimal – as it stands even the public switched network produces echo, and delay in some international calls; so the VoIP call quality is not much different overall.

    #1179170
    Gizmo
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    MichaelDigital, post: 211342 wrote:
    The Amazon global network, as you may know, has regional access nodes, the one servicing Australia is the Sydney based one – this is what makes AWS services so efficient, fast and scalable – not to mention very economical – voice data is digitally identical with any other data. You will always experience variations in the throughput in accordance with the infrastructure, backbone e.t.c
    the variations in actual user experience is going to minimal – as it stands even the public switched network produces echo, and delay in some international calls; so the VoIP call quality is not much different overall.

    Just to add. Voice data is only identical from the point of view its a data packet.
    But at the application level its very different.
    Voice data is MUCH more susceptible to networks with Jitter and Packet loss.
    I would not reccomend running voice over infrastructure that can add to this.
    Typically these are infrastructures that timeslice CPU, RAM, Harddisk and Network resource across multiple clients. This time slicing can add jitter and this then increases latency due to the need of jitter buffers. Or even worse if the jitter is big enough it leads to packet loss or bad audio as after a certain length of delay in jitter then at the application level the data is disregarded as its arrived to late.

    Coneptually its like this (not exactly but this is an easy to understand example) You say hello into a phone.
    This gets digitized into data. Lets say 5 packets one for each letter ( this is the conceptual part).
    A delay is then encountered while Amazon systems fire up more resources for your server or as it slices in someone else’s request.
    This happens when the letter “e” data packet is trying to be processed.
    This then means all the packets arrive around the same time to the person listening to you.
    They system cannot wait for the “e” as its taken too long already.
    The net result
    1) A delay
    2) An incomplete word leading to bad audio.

    #1179171
    arrowwise
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    I would be interested to test the call quality via this Amazon overseas VOIP system versus that of a local Australia tier one business grade VOIP provider. If there is a test call I can make to some-one on that network let me know.

    The average business / customers doesn’t even know what a business grade call should sound like, and unfortunately many are putting up (or unknowingly accepting) substandard call quality compared to a rock steady traditional PSTN phone system.

    #1179172
    MichaelDigital
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    arrowwise, post: 211369 wrote:
    I would be interested to test the call quality via this Amazon overseas VOIP system versus that of a local Australia tier one business grade VOIP provider. If there is a test call I can make to some-one on that network let me know.

    The average business / customers doesn’t even know what a business grade call should sound like, and unfortunately many are putting up (or unknowingly accepting) substandard call quality compared to a rock steady traditional PSTN phone system.

    That is very true – often customers are led by the nose into using VoIP phone systems when the publicly available choices are more than adequate – it just depends what you want to do – in my own case I offer SMS services so this little system allows me to do that without incurring massive costs. Checksum, it is a wonderful little component of the IP protocol, very old, but works like a charm for stray packets ;) Anyway – when we have done parading our learning, what was the question?

    #1179173
    Gizmo
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    Hi,

    I’m not sure why others are leading people to VoIP when compared to a local PBX/Phone System connected to PSTN lines with the major telcos.

    For me, I lead customers to the Cloud PBX VoIP solution I offer for the following reasons:

    1) The service costs less to set up than a traditional phone system
    2) The service is features rich
    3) The service gives more flexibility
    4) The service reduces the current phone bill costs
    5) We offer excellent customer support

    I see it as the natural progression of phone system technology. Industry and market analysts agree with this outlook and believe that Cloud PBX services are what most businesses will be using for their phone system within the next 10 years.

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