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  • #999244
    Viknan
    Member
    • Total posts: 2

    Hello Soloists and FS Team,

    I would like to say thank you for accepting my sign up and I look forward to navigating my through the site and learning new skills. I am nervously embarking on a new sideline as a grant officer/consultant to the sole trading/small businesses here in rural SW QLD as well as the community organisations. I see the potential of what my support can do, I have been successful in obtaining grants and I feel confident I understand my demographical area and obligations required for the funding.

    Many businesses are too busy battling drought and other personal and business matters to seek and apply for grants or assistance and some are not technology confident.

    So here I am…but I need help if anyone on FS can spare some knowledge I would appreciate the advice. I won’t be a free service and I’m battling to get my head around a fair fee that can benefit everyone.

    Thanks for the opportunity to introduce myself. Looking forward to collaborating with the community

    Regards
    Vik

    #1218572
    bb1
    Participant
    • Total posts: 4,485

    Your fee like any other business will be based on your costs to run your business, provide the service, how many hours its takes, and still leave enough money to pay yourself an income to feed yourself and your family (?).

    Not the answer you really wanted, but it is hard for anyone to really say you should be charging X $’s, because that may not cover your requirements or costs.

    Do a google search (or your favourite search tool), as there are calculators around for how much you should charge per hour based on your input costs, and other things.

    Just from my understanding of applying for a grant not all are the same, so it’s not as if you can have a simple flat fee, so you may need to look at an hourly rate. Or at least know your hourly rate, so that when you do an estimate on the job you can work out how much.

    #1218573
    Viknan
    Member
    • Total posts: 2

    Thanks for your reply Bert

    I have goggleboxed around but most of the sites are American based. I do know some businesses who provide grant services do have a flat fee set to various funding amounts. I will search for a calculator and do some number crunching.

    #1218574
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840

    Surely anyone in need of a grant (assistance?) shouldn’t have to pay money to receive it.

    If they do, doesn’t it mean the process is far to complicated/rigorous? Shouldn’t that be fixed rather than applicants essentially losing a %age of the money they apparently need?

    #1218575
    RunicConvenience
    Member
    • Total posts: 186

    Not really Johny. not everyone is patient or willing to go out and deal with all the things they need. using someone else a third party is not a reason to assume the process is too hard.

    even people who can’t nagivate to specific websites without having there “IT” set shortcuts for the bank/gmail/facebook access on the desktop. may have other skills that work well for them in areas I could see myself paying them to do so.

    alas my opinion is my own.

    #1218576
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840

    Not really Johny. not everyone is patient or willing to go out and deal with all the things they need. using someone else a third party is not a reason to assume the process is too hard.

    In a general sense you get my full agreement.

    Here we are talking about people who consider they are in that much need they are seeking provision of taxpayer money.for support – and they don’t have the patience to do the work to get it?

    If they are prepared to ask for $100, but payout $20 for someone else to do the legwork, then they don’t need $100.

    even people who can’t nagivate to specific websites without having there “IT” set shortcuts for the bank/gmail/facebook access on the desktop. may have other skills that work well for them in areas I could see myself paying them to do so.

    If someone can’t navigate a website then either they shouldn’t be in business, or, as mentioned, the process is too complicated.

    I should say I fully agree with people getting support in circumstances such as drought as I have seen the result, not only from primary producers, but the effect it has on small communities. But that then requires the money going to where it is intended.

    Mate, we all have opinions so that’s fair enough. It would be boring if they were always the same.

    #1218577
    bb1
    Participant
    • Total posts: 4,485
    Johny, post: 263655, member: 34822 wrote:
    If they do, doesn’t it mean the process is far to complicated/rigorous? Shouldn’t that be fixed rather than applicants essentially losing a %age of the money they apparently need?
    If it’s our tax dollars going to someone they should have to justify getting the money, and as such it should be a very rigorous process with many stages of justification
    #1218578
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840

    If it’s our tax dollars going to someone they should have to justify getting the money, and as such it should be a very rigorous process with many stages of justification

    Granted.

    Clarification – Rigorous in terms of being too complex for the average person to be able to do themselves.

    #1218579
    bb1
    Participant
    • Total posts: 4,485
    Johny, post: 263659, member: 34822 wrote:
    Granted.

    Clarification – Rigorous in terms of being too complex for the average person to be able to do themselves.

    Think of it like a business case, back in my IT life, I could document all the technical benefits to my group or to the end customer, but the business case manager could flush out all $ benefit’s and other non technical stuff. Remember grants could be for many many thousands of dollars.

    One grant I was involved with everyone on the community group could list all the benefits, but not to a point where their was any real tangible benefits to the community, whereas we managed to enlist a friend of a friend, who made our wish list into a must have benefit. Remember most community and even small business’s have skills in a defined area directly with there core function, not skills at selling those benefits to the wider world.

    #1218580
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840

    No different from applying for a bank loan. Provide details, tell your story, it gets assessed.

    As far as I am concerned, if you have to spend money (you don’t have or you wouldn’t be applying for it) to be able to get support there is something wrong. For me it requires fixing the system, not increasing/deflecting/charging more to do it.

    #1218581
    bb1
    Participant
    • Total posts: 4,485
    Johny, post: 263661, member: 34822 wrote:
    No different from applying for a bank loan. Provide details, tell your story, it gets assessed.

    Bank loan you only have to convince the bank that you can pay them back, or have sufficient collateral for them to sell to recoup their money.

    A grant you are basically never going to pay it back (money for nothing), so you need to prove a lot harder that their is community (or other) real benefit, how you intend to spend it, what the benefit is (tangible and intangible), who is responsible, etc, etc, etc. A bank doesn’t care about any of that just that they get their $’s.

    #1218582
    Paul – FS Concierge
    Keymaster
    • Total posts: 3,173

    Hi And Welcome to Flying Solo [USER=113349]@Viknan[/USER] . It is great to have you!

    Thank you for joining our community and posting today.

    Applying for Grants is definitely a skill unto its own and the benefits of receiving a grant are self evident so there should be a business in there to assist other businesses obtain them.

    Another pricing option is to have a hybrid model of a “package” that gets XYZ and an additional hourly rate that kicks in when a threshold is passed.

    Cheers

    #1218583
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840

    Think of it like a business case

    Why?

    If you are selling a grant based on a business case you would rarely get one approved. That’s the essence of what a grant is – providing a benefit because you can’t support it on a business case. If you do have a business case, you get a loan.

    #1218584
    bb1
    Participant
    • Total posts: 4,485
    Johny, post: 263684, member: 34822 wrote:
    Why?

    If you are selling a grant based on a business case you would rarely get one approved. That’s the essence of what a grant is – providing a benefit because you can’t support it on a business case. If you do have a business case, you get a loan.

    Community groups don’t take out loans, they are funded from other means and are generally not for profit.

    The business case in this instance is the community benefit rather then the ability to pay back the loan.

    But in either case you need to substantiate the benefits.

    #1218585
    Johny
    Member
    • Total posts: 840

    In the end Bert, there are different types of grants for different types of things.

    If a community can’t highlight the reason for/benefits of the grant they want, then I go back to my original comment. Either the process is too complicated and/or you question the competence of those in the community.

    Remember most community and even small business’s have skills in a defined area directly with there core function, not skills at selling those benefits to the wider world.

    Rubbish. Any decent small business person has a large number of skills. They are constantly selling themselves, their products etc.If you have a local council, a rotary club and all manner of different places within a community, and can’t come up with a resource/s to structure a request, then got to wonder. (Enlisting a friend of a friend for example?)

    Back in the mid 90’s I worked in one of the worst drought affected areas in Qld. I was constantly writing reviews about farmers who had to alter repayment arrangements, restructure finance etc. Somehow they managed to apply for govt grants at the time, in some cases 10’s of thousands of $$, and they managed to do it all by themselves. (People whose core function is planting stuff and then cutting /picking it after a few months.)

    Those were of course the days where we would get local community groups asking us to audit their books, which we did as individuals for nothing – you know, mucking in as part of a community. That seemed to work well until the rules were changed and they had to be audited by paid professionals – taking money out of the hands of the relevant group – ie meaning less they could use to support their cause.

    If a grant is required, in a case like drought were the applicant relies on it for survival during a tough period, then the reason and benefit are simple. It will take a lot to convince me that part of those funds should go to someone to write the application. I would even go as far as saying it shouldn’t be allowed.

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