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  • #982914
    Lahay
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    • Total posts: 34
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    Hi,

    I will start with the story behind my question.

    Last night, my teenage kids came home from a Lee Kernaghan concert, raving about how patriotic they felt & how they were going to visit the country towns in Lee’s songs one day.

    Imagine my dismay, when they showed me the t-shirts they had bought at the concert- made in China!!!!!

    Please know that I am not suggesting that we should only buy Australian- I am merely suggesting that we at least look at buying Australian goods/ services first, without always presuming overseas is cheaper & therefore better.

    So my question is………. how do I convey this passion via Facebook, website etc, without sounding like I am preaching? That is, starting my own mini revolution without alienating anyone that visits my website, Facebook page etc.

    Looking forward to your comments,

    Jocelyn Serone
    Lahay
    http://www.lahay.com.au
    http://www.facebook.com/Lahay

    #1139561
    LucasArthur
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    Hey Jocelyn

    Great observation.. Not that i have a great deal of input on the way to move forward with this ‘movement’.. although i am curious on how you would tackle your inherent bias on this observation.. meaning, you sell Australian Made clothing…

    Just you would not want to be seen as pushing your own product whilst sledging Chinese Made being sold at Aussie Concerts etc….

    Look forward to seeing this grow..

    Jason

    Jason Ramage | Lucas Arthur Pty Ltd | E: [email protected]   P: 61 3 8324 0344    M: 61 412 244 888
    #1139562
    Lahay
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    SimplyReplica, post: 159351 wrote:
    Hey Jocelyn

    Great observation.. Not that i have a great deal of input on the way to move forward with this ‘movement’.. although i am curious on how you would tackle your inherent bias on this observation.. meaning, you sell Australian Made clothing…

    Just you would not want to be seen as pushing your own product whilst sledging Chinese Made being sold at Aussie Concerts etc….

    Look forward to seeing this grow..

    Jason

    Hi Jason,

    Thank you for your comments, although I do want to clarify that I was not “sledging” to push my product out there- believe me, promotional t-shirts by the thousands is not the direction my business is going :)

    My point was that you can buy an iconic R M Williams shirt (or a Lee Kernaghan t-shirt), thinking that you are investing in something Aussie, only to read the tag- made in China. And the only reason for this is economics.

    I am not just meaning buying Australian made clothing (because as you say, I manufacture this), I am meaning furniture, groceries, website deisigning, printing etc.

    I firmly believe that buying Australian, where possible, is better for our economy ( & therefore our kids futures) & the environment.

    Anyway, back to my original question…. how to get your own personal message out there without preaching :)

    Jocelyn Serone

    #1139563
    CindyK
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    Hi Jocelyn,

    With a bit of marketing!!

    Think about the differences between what you see as preaching and what you see as marketing. How many eagle boys ads are on TV or dove soap etc. We don’t generally think of them preaching at us – but they saturate their market, they talk about benefits, they make their point calmly, in lots of different ways. Some times straight on and sometimes on a tangent.

    I always think of preaching as staid, boring and constant. The same message, without a lot of how the actual product, issue, point relates the person that is listening to the message.

    Could you add articles to your website and links to facebook with benefits of buying Australian made? Could you create a nice, succinct philosophy that you want to expound and stick to. Focus on the benefits.
    We love aussie made – why you should too…
    We buy Australian made to support our Australian workers – could you give it a go?

    Sounds better than: Only buy Australian made. Don’t buy from overseas. Etc etc.

    And always remember to win by patiently making your point again and again but not judging the choices of others. For example, I know that often with recording artists, alot of that merchandise comes from their own pocket. They don’t necessarily have the funds to pre-purchase all the gear before the concert. So cheap might be the only way it happens.

    Putting your customers in line with and in a position to help Australian made without over hurting their pockets helps too – where can they shop? What should they look for? What would buying just one piece of Australian made clothing do for our economy?

    Good Luck!!

    #1139564
    Lahay
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    Hi CindyK,

    Thanks for your imput! Lots there to think on.

    I know I started off with the whole buying Australian made theme, but in my head, I was also thinking of things that I believe in e.g. children’s charities & the environment, but am always scared to mention this in my business, for fear of scaring people off & thinking that you are just big noting yourself :) It is a fine line between showing potential customers what your point of difference is & ramming your personal beliefs down their throat!!!!

    But now I have read your post, you have made me realise that it is ok to talk about what matters to me & those in my business, provided it is done in the right manner.

    Thank you for your many useful tips & time,
    Jocelyn Serone

    #1139565
    MatthewKeath
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    Hi,

    Most people when pushed will say they support Aussie manufacturing, but in reality they don’t really care.

    I’m a little more transparent. I buy the product I think is best, and if its made here then it’s a bonus.

    I think the most important thing is to give people a reason the buy your product that is above simply being where it was made. Dick Smith is a good example. His entire marketing strategy was based on the fact his products were Aussie made. When it turned out that most people didn’t care and his sales fell 80% he blamed.

    Those Chinese made shirts you speak of still support Aussies.

    #1139566
    MatthewKeath
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    Oh, I didn’t really answer the question did I?

    Don’t be scared to give your brand values – just be aware that not all people will share your views and this you will attract detractors.

    Whole Foods is a good US example.

    #1139567
    Burgo
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    Most of our Aussie manufacturing has been forced of shore because of spiraling cost here in Australia. You cant blame the manufacturers from doing this as we as a people have forced them to do this.
    We want to buy quality products for a reasonable price. The Manufacturer has to cover his costs and make a profit to survive.

    An example of quality products sold at a reasonable price is “Rivers” but their products are made overseas.

    I was fortunate to have lived in a time when we did manufacture all our own products. They were not necessarilly any better quality than what we have to day, but in those days Factory workers did not earn good wages.
    Things changed slowly and Factory workers started to earn better wages but consumers were not prepared to pay the higher prices so many manufacturers either went broke or sort cheeper production facillities.

    We buy what we need, if is made here great if not I have what i need at a reasonable price.

    #1139568
    bluepenguin
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    Jamie Oliver is a great example of someone that’s enormously passionate about various causes, but has very few enemies. He’s all over social media, so it may be worth seeing how he goes about things. He’s dyslexic, so not everything makes sense…

    #1139569
    Lahay
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    bluepenguin, post: 159401 wrote:
    Jamie Oliver is a great example of someone that’s enormously passionate about various causes, but has very few enemies. He’s all over social media, so it may be worth seeing how he goes about things. He’s dyslexic, so not everything makes sense…
    Great example of what I’m talking about!!!!!!

    Thank you!
    Jocelyn

    #1139570
    Burgo
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    One lesson learnt was the more you try to push your product the less people take notice.
    If your customers push your product , the more business you make.
    The trick is to get your customers to become as passionate about your product and services that they do the hard work for you.
    I still have people trying to get to do their carpets five years after I stopped working

    #1139571
    Johny
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    Great example of what I’m talking about!!!!!!

    But you also have to pick the right battles and have a convincing argument to justify your stance.

    I just looked at some of your comments:-

    Imagine my dismay, when they showed me the t-shirts they had bought at the concert- made in China!!!!!

    And the only reason for this is economics.

    You make clothes, why don’t you go down the path of making mass produced shirts for promotions??

    If you don’t want to go down that path, is there anyone else in Australia that does it? If not, why not and, if you don’t want to do it, why should you be dismayed that noone else is doing it either?

    I don’t know the answers, but I suspect that a part of it is that manufacturers like yourself cannot compete with the imports. And if that is correct, then it is not just an economic issue for the buyers, it is also an economic issue for you and other manufacturers.

    Yes, Jamie Oliver does support some causes he believes in, but he also seems to put his money where his mouth is and gets involved in the physical side of fixing what he perceives as being the problem.

    I know you will look at my comments as a negative take on your view, but that is not my intention. I just have a different take on issues like this as I see it from a completely different angle than many here.

    I see “Buy Australian” as sort of a protectionist stance when we live in a world where everything is just an email away. And I believe that Australians underestimate themselves to a degree in what they could do if they looked outside this mindset.

    If there was as much effort spent finding ways to promote Aussie products overseas that may provide a much bigger boost in employment and earnings than catering to what is essentially a small market.

    You get the same arguments all over the world about people buying based on cost. But there is a much bigger slice of the pie outside Australia than within, and many Australians don’t see it because they are spending all their time looking for reasons to cater to a small market rather than seek opprortunities to grow.

    Doesn’t answer your question, but hopefully offers an alternative view that may also provoke some thinking.

    #1139572
    Burgo
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    Try and buy a decent NZ wine in New Zealand. Heeps of Australian wines even some you cant buy here.

    Promotional material is so often made overseas because you can get bigger production runs at a cheeper price. they are not looking for quality they are looking at making money and that is what has happened in society.

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