Home – New Forums Tell me straight… Please review my shopping wesite

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  • #989322
    Anonymous
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    I have just launched my website few days ago.
    I haven’t got time to do any SEO for the website, so please ignore this part for now.

    1. What needs reviewing?
    Website layout / structure – is it logical / easy to navigate?
    Products itself
    website responsiveness? does it look alright in different browser or monitor?
    Any error as well as room for improvement that you can see

    2. What does your business do?
    We source unique designer product internationally, from homeware to jewellery. I believe most of our products you couldn’t find anywhere else in Australia.

    3. Who is your target market?
    25-45 mainly women, who love designs rather than mass produced product.

    Thank you in advance.

    Keith

    #1171559
    Craig.Smith
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    Hi Keith,

    I found the website pretty easy to navigate and work out what the purpose of the website is.

    – When you say responsiveness, I assume you are referring to the speed of the website. It is a little on the slow side at 6-7s per page load, ideally you would want to be under 4s. But this still should be ok as a starting point.
    – The website isn’t a responsive design as in you don’t have a tailored UI for mobiles and tablets which makes up a very large proportion of users now. Just for my website, 60% of my traffic from facebook is on a mobile device and 40% from google are on mobiles. It would be wise to ensure these users are catered for.
    – Obviously you have some seo work to do.

    #1171560
    Anonymous
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    Craig.Smith, post: 199200 wrote:
    Hi Keith,

    I found the website pretty easy to navigate and work out what the purpose of the website is.

    – When you say responsiveness, I assume you are referring to the speed of the website. It is a little on the slow side at 6-7s per page load, ideally you would want to be under 4s. But this still should be ok as a starting point.
    – The website isn’t a responsive design as in you don’t have a tailored UI for mobiles and tablets which makes up a very large proportion of users now. Just for my website, 60% of my traffic from facebook is on a mobile device and 40% from google are on mobiles. It would be wise to ensure these users are catered for.
    – Obviously you have some seo work to do.

    Thanks for your advice Craig,

    I will certainly put effort for mobile and tablet user in near future!

    #1171561
    Zava Design
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    2014, your website has gotta be responsive at the very least! Do you have traffic data of how many mobile users are hitting your site?

    And the top I found overly busy, as soon as I scrolled just a little and hid that dark bar at the top it seemed so much cleaner as a design and layout. Too many options can confuse a user, I’d recommend simplifying the top area of the site. At the moment you have all these options for a user to click on which have nothing to do with the core objective of your site: getting people to buy something.

    With the “quick sale ending” message, what sale? There’s no prices or indication of what’s on sale or how much off. This kind of message should be simple and clear.

    #1171562
    Anonymous
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    Zava Design, post: 199217 wrote:
    2014, your website has gotta be responsive at the very least! Do you have traffic data of how many mobile users are hitting your site?

    And the top I found overly busy, as soon as I scrolled just a little and hid that dark bar at the top it seemed so much cleaner as a design and layout. Too many options can confuse a user, I’d recommend simplifying the top area of the site. At the moment you have all these options for a user to click on which have nothing to do with the core objective of your site: getting people to buy something.

    With the “quick sale ending” message, what sale? There’s no prices or indication of what’s on sale or how much off. This kind of message should be simple and clear.

    Thanks for pointing out the flaws, I agree with your points. I will chat with the developer and improve it!!

    #1171563
    Byron Trzeciak
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    keith.z, post: 199172 wrote:
    I have just launched my website few days ago.
    I haven’t got time to do any SEO for the website, so please ignore this part for now.
    http://www.gorgor.com.au

    I know you’ve said to ignore the SEO part of it but SEO, website structure and optimised URLs are critical for the success of your website. I’m seeing this all the time with online stores and that they’re really going to struggle in search engines.

    Get it right from the start, especially with online stores, otherwise it will become a very expensive afterthought to get it right in the future when you’ve got 1000s of products in your stores.

    keith.z, post: 199172 wrote:
    1. What needs reviewing?
    Website layout / structure – is it logical / easy to navigate?
    Products itself
    website responsiveness? does it look alright in different browser or monitor?
    Any error as well as room for improvement that you can see

    2. What does your business do?
    We source unique designer product internationally, from homeware to jewellery. I believe most of our products you couldn’t find anywhere else in Australia.

    3. Who is your target market?
    25-45 mainly women, who love designs rather than mass produced product.

    The home page could definitely be improved. Forget about the “pretty” design features and make sure that it’s clean and simple.

    Some of the products you look at you don’t know what they are just by the image. You should seperate it into categories so i can understand what I’m looking at.

    Your logo looks like it’s badly compressed jpeg. It’s not clean.

    I think the font looks bad, is it times new roman? I think you should change that to something cleaner and more modern.

    Hope that helps.

    #1171564
    EthanBBB
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    My first impressions when viewing your site is that I don’t know where I should be looking first. There appears to be a lot going on at the top of the page, but nothing stands out. I would work on identifying what parts of your page you want customers to see first. This will help with your layout.

    As previously stated by Byron, the logo looks low quality. This should be something that people see first and it is important that it looks professional.

    SEO is extremely important and you need to get started on that as soon as possible. The more traffic that you can attract from this, the less you will need to rely on paid ads, etc.

    Good luck!

    #1171565
    Jake Howard
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    Hi Keith,

    I really like the look and feel of your website. It looks very clean and modern, much like The Iconic website.

    Nice professional looking clean images, good use of icons and I like the big buttons down the bottom for Free Shipping, FAQ’s etc.

    Looking at easy things you could do to further improve the website, I have made a couple of short points below:

    1. The scrolling “We are design enthusiasts” is quite distracting and it competes with the main hero shot section (which is great by the way). When I clicked on it, there didnt appear to be any information, and is definetly not worth drawing people’s attention to. You may like to consider stopping it from scrolling, in fact I firmly encourage you to do so :)

    2. You most valuable section of the website is above the fold (the area visible on screen when you first open the website. You want to make sure your best content is above the fold, as this is what people are going to see when they first visit your website and first impressions last. You have got four horizontal menu bars across the top taking up valuable real estate. You may be able to work out a way to reduce this, so you can move more of the page up into the visible area. Also “Free Shipping” is a great incentive for people to buy from your website, so you may like to make it more prominent within the visible area.

    3. With the Free Shipping, FAQ and Returns Guarantee buttons, you actually have to click on the icon or text in order for the button to work. The entire button should act as a link, so that users can click anywhere to access the page.

    While the above may seem trivial, we recently made all of the above changes to our website 2 months ago and we saw instant improvements in online orders right from the first day of implementing the changes.

    Cheers

    Jake

    #1171566
    Anonymous
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    keith.z, post: 199172 wrote:
    I have just launched my website few days ago.
    I haven’t got time to do any SEO for the website, so please ignore this part for now.
    http://www.gorgor.com.au

    1. What needs reviewing?
    Any error as well as room for improvement that you can see

    Keith

    Hi Keith,

    I think you’ve got a good start.

    However, I want to pick up on the logo because I see this problem everywhere. To me, it doesn’t look very clean. Either it’s been digitised and not cleaned up well, or too much compression has been applied.

    Here’s your logo with a filter applied so you can see what I’m taking about.
    logo.png

    The fuzzy bits around the letters is what I’m on about. I see a lot of logos with the same issue. Depending on the users’ monitor these fuzzy bits can be quite noticeable. I think it makes a site look unprofessional.

    Another thing you’ll notice in the above image is the repeating “H”s. It seems you have a repeating background image that’s not quite white.
    http://gorgor.com.au/images/web_image/header_bg.jpg”

    Whilst it’s not very noticeable, I’d question its necessity. Is this meant to be white? Perhaps this could be replaced by CSS?

    Hope that helps and good luck with the sales!

    Ian

    #1171567
    JohnW
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    Hi Keith,
    Big problems, IMHO.

    You don’t tell us:

    • What you sell.
    • Who you are selling to.
    • Anything about the products.
    • How to pay.
    • You also provide misleading information.

    The answers to the first 4 must be visible above the fold on every site page.

    As to the fifth, providing mis-information is a good way to drive people away.

    “Sharing for free shipping”. It’s not true is it? Unless I misread your “Shipping & Returns” page delivery is only free within Australia.

    Why don’t you feature “free shipping Australia-wide” above the fold on every page instead of misleading us with the Facebook “sharing for free shipping” link.

    Load Speed – Sorry, I think you’re dead!

    90 requests needed to load your Home page and 2+megs of data that needs to be tranferred to view it.

    It takes 7 secs for your Home above the fold to display. The useability studies tell us you get 2 secs before people start hitting their back buttons.

    Combine this with the fact that you don’t tell us what you sell and to whom while other info is loading… I expect visitors will be very savage on back button clicks with your site.

    I went to your Blog. I fail to see any purpose behind this.

    You say you don’t want feedback on SEO. Just as well because there is none and it won’t happen with what we see here. I hope you have a big budget for online advertising because you are unlikely to attract many people to your site without it.

    PS. All the research I’ve seen suggests that shopping carts are less reliant on smartphone users than many other types of sites. The research suggests that Smartphone users are much more likely to use shopping site apps.
    Good luck!
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1171568
    Zava Design
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    PS. All the research I’ve seen suggests that shopping carts are less reliant on smartphone users than many other types of sites. The research suggests that Smartphone users are much more likely to use shopping site apps.

    http://www.digitalbusiness.gov.au/2014/02/25/responsive-design-drives-online-retail-revenue/

    • O’Neill Clothing grew iPhone/iPad revenue by 101.2 per cent, Android revenue by 591.4 per cent (yes, nearly six hundred per cent) and non-mobile revenue by 41.1 per cent.
    • Skinny Ties grew iPhone revenue by 377.6 per cent and total revenue by 42 per cent.
    • Homage grew smartphone revenue by 359.5 per cent and tablet revenue by 178.8 per cent.
    • Plusnet grew smartphone and tablet online revenue tenfold year over year.

    Another pertinent point from the above article:

    “It’s a multi-screen world. According to Google’s Think Insights research study fifty-nine percent of Australians start their shopping on a smartphone, whereas only 24 per cent start on a laptop or desktop.”

    Logic suggests that the more mobile device friendly your ecommerce site, the more likely someone may make a purchase sooner rather than later, especially as they become more comfortable with the idea, just as the did with purchasing online in the first place. There are numerous of REAL WORLD case studies backing up the fact that a well implemented responsive ecommerce site is likely to increase purchases significantly. We really should be past the stage of even needing to debate this fact.

    Joe Smith is NOT going to go to the Play Store and download the app for “Steve Jone’s Watch Store”. They will enjoy using a well executed responsive ecommerce site and as the case studies above indicate (and MANY more like these) are more likely to make a purchase as a result.

    #1171569
    JohnW
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    Hi Zava,
    The Internet’s biggest problems include information accuracy, validity and interpretation.

    IMHO, anecdotal info such as the Digitalbusiness page you reference doesn’t really help. We are not told the time frame nor the sample size. Did it grow from one mobile device order to six orders over the last 7 years? Were these orders placed on Smartphones or tablets? We don’t know so I for one, can’t be impressed.

    In my mind, we must draw a major distinction between the needs of Smartphone users and mobile tablet users when interpreting any user surveys. The reason being that tablets are alternatives to desktops while Smartphones with their usability problems are totally unique.

    IMHO, the Google study you reference has the smell of a PR driven promotion.

    A major flaw in the study (The New Multi-screen World: Understanding Cross-platform Consumer Behaviour) is that this pretty little summary for the media contains no detailed methodology.

    From what I can read, this survey ONLY reports multiple device usage information. It looks to me like any stand alone use of a device is specifically excluded from the study. Does that then exclude most user’s access to the Internet? We are not told.

    Sorry, but I must offer what I believe is a correction to your post.

    What the study does NOT report is that, “fifty-nine percent of Australians start their shopping on a Smartphone”.

    What it reports is that when people are using multiple devices, 59% start “shopping” on a Smartphone.

    It also tells us that then they ALL switch to a desktop (55%) or a tablet (5%).

    Zava Design, post: 203158 wrote:
    that a well implemented responsive ecommerce site is likely to increase purchases significantly.
    The study you quote seems to indicate that people switch from Smartphones to desktops/tablets when they want to order from an ecommerce site.

    Perhaps you can quote us a survey that is relevant to the e-commerce needs of Smartphone users?

    Zava Design, post: 203158 wrote:
    Joe Smith is NOT going to go to the Play Store
    Of course not.

    But the study you reference may provide a clue to where they do go to download a shopping app.

    The study tells us that much of the mobile phone shopping usage is spontaneous and driven by a TV stimulus. It seems likely that some people who are impressed by a retail website are downloading the retailer’s apps direct from their site.

    You may want to check out some other surveys and studies that I found relevant.

    7 Nov 14: “Prediction: a 15% jump in online shopping this holiday season – Adobe

    “Analysis of 20 billion visits to ecommerce websites has led Adobe to predict that Australians…”

    “By the end of the year 8% of all online sales in Australia are predicted to be conducted through phones..”

    “shopping on tablets stagnant at around 11% year on year.”
    It seems to suggest that the e-commerce shopping process on Smartphones leaves a lot to be desired and has a very long way to go.

    I’m guessing it is a combination of tiny keypad, tiny screen, poor visual quality screens, complexity of the ordering process, slow access speed and security that are currently the big inhibitors of mobile phone e-commerce.

    Apps can potentially reduce some of these problems and some retailers are apparently seeing a big use of apps to order online already.

    21 Aug 14: “How often do shoppers use retail apps?

    “App engagement” is a new mobile commerce metric that’s critical for retailers to monitor, and one featured in the new 2015 Internet Retailer Mobile 500, where 42% of m-commerce sales come through apps.”

    “Mobile 500 retail apps with the highest engagement levels include Neiman Marcus (64.3%), Kohl’s (63.6%), Victoria’s Secret (61.7%), H&M (56.6%) and Groupon (47.8%).”

    Hope this helps you keep up to speed or provides you with some balance.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1171570
    MatthewKeath
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    I am confused to the point of this discussion.

    1. A well designed mobile responsive store is a must.

    2. If you are a larger business, then maybe you can convince people to download an app and buy from there.

    Personally, I think a well designed mobile store negates the need for an app.

    But hey, i rarely shop online!

    (I do use online to find what I need though)

    #1171571
    Zava Design
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    This would seem to illustrate your ignorance of the technology behind apps:

    “It seems likely that some people who are impressed by a retail website are downloading the retailer’s apps direct from their site.”

    You cannot simply “download” an app from a website. You download apps from iTunes or from Google Play.

    And as I said, users will not do that for a non-major ecommerce brand, end of story, unless there’s a MAJOR change in user habits that has been consistent throughout the growth of the Internet: If you place obstacles in front of users to get to the information they are seeking you will lose a high percentage of those users. Registering, logging in, downloading special software are all barriers to success, not facilitators. That is never going to change.

    And one of your quotes only reinforces my point:

    “42% of all mobile sales generated by the leading 500 merchants in m-commerce in 2014 will come from mobile apps”.

    As I said, the major players on the online retail space (Amazon, Ebay and the like) will have most people comfortable with downloading and using their app. And those players would make up a sizable percentage of that 42%, as these figures would indicate: http://mashable.com/2014/05/08/amazon-sales-chart/

    So if the major players are taking up the majority of that 42% (which would likely happen even if every ecommerce operator in the world created an app), then that means there are an awful lot of online stores doing very well without an app. And from the case studies that are coming in every day, that seems to be only increasing with the growth of responsive ecommerce sites.

    No interpretation or theories, cold hard facts.

    #1171572
    Zava Design
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    MatthewKeath, post: 203212 wrote:
    I am confused to the point of this discussion.
    So am I, but felt the need initially to respond to some highly subjective opinion being presented as fait accompli to those who may not have quite the depth of experience online.
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