Home – New Forums Money matters Quoting for a large fast-turnaround job

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  • #981401
    BlackCoffeeComms
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    Hi all,

    A big annual report landed on my desk yesterday – 50+ pages plus financials (30,000 words) Will get the raw copy Monday Feb 4 and the PDF needs to be presented to the Vic Parli on March 1- so I am guessing it needs to do to the designer at least a week before then.

    In other words, I will have three weeks to turn it around, which will definitely mean working nights and weekends as I have a few other small jobs already (obviously I won’t accept new work till the report is done).

    Problem is, I have no idea how to quote for it. I know their budget and I figure the fast turnaround and the fact that I will have to shuffle other work is worth a premium on top of my usual hourly rate.

    So do I just quote a flat fee which will cover about three-week’s full time work? I know I have the job anyway (through a friend and desperate since the writer they had engaged pull out at the last minute). Do I break down the quote into research and writing? Do I include milestone payments (It is a university and from my experience larger organisation’s accounts payable units are very unlikely to meet my usual 50 per cent upfront payment).

    I want to get it right (the quote and the report) because it could mean repeat work (ie next year’s report), but, after 18 months of quoting for small jobs only, I really have no idea where to start!

    Help!

    #1130137
    Brent@Ontrax
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    Congratulations on getting the job.

    I suppose in this case they really have no choice in the cost, but as you said you don’t want to be too greedy, as there may be repeat work.

    I would prepare the quote showing a break down, as use your normal pricing, but add a fee for Emergency reaction/Immediate Attention. This way they will know what your rates are (and you don’t have to try and remember what you charged last time) and they also understand that you have charged a bit more cause you have had to drop everything and attent to them.

    Us IT Guys do the same thing (we most of us), we have a standard rate but if you want an Emergency callout, then there’s usually an extra hour charged.

    Good Luck with your project.
    Brent

    #1130138
    Anonymous
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    What a fabulous problem to have Nicole!

    These articles by Julia Bickerstaff might contain some handy tips for you.

    Good luck!
    Jayne

    #1130139
    The Copy Chick
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    Nice one Nicole!! :)

    I think you’re on the right track. Break your quote down into the individual components: research, sample pages (if you’re going to do that), first draft, first draft revisions, second draft, second draft revisions, etc.

    Also include a timefame which outlines when you anticipate to start/complete each portion of the project (subject, of course, to them returning the copy with feedback by the agreed dates).

    If you need to work outside your usual hours to meet their deadline, definitely include a rush fee, or “premium service” fee of some type.

    I think the more detail you can give, and the more you can break it down, the better.

    It’s also worth breaking the project into distinct phases for progress payments. Depending on the final price maybe 4 x 25% (deposit, completion of research phase, completion of first draft, final payment) or if it’s a 3 week job, maybe 3 weekly payments of X amount.

    Hope that helps and good luck!!

    A :)

    #1130140
    BlackCoffeeComms
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    Thanks everyone for input – will check out those articles Jayne.

    It is a bit of a first-world problem, and a good one at that. :) And it has come at an opportune time as part of my 2013 marketing plan is to pimp for annual reports. This will look good on my proposals.

    I think I will break it down by research/drafts of the front section, proofing the financials and then final sign off.

    Thanks again

    Nicole

    #1130141
    KB
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    Hi Nicole

    Congratulations! Great job to land.

    In my experience with government, payment will be on their terms, ie monthly (so make sure you’re prompt with invoicing prior to their payment date).

    I agree with Anna – you definitely need to break it up into sections and provide a timeline (subject to them returning the material on time). Make sure you include costs if having to work out of normal work hours – or increase your hourly rate to cover this if you know that working long hours are a given. Make this very clear if you are working outside of these hours and you have to turn work around to meet deadlines because they were unable to get stuff back to you by agreed times (this is why the timeline is so important – make sure you get sign-off from them that the timeline is appropriate).

    Cheers
    Kathryn

    #1130142
    Shaukat Adam Khalid
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    An annual report is crucial for a business. They have a bigger budget than you think and the only reason they will give you business is the same reason you will give others business ie over delivery and giving them a perspective they never had.

    Nothing to do with price or hours. The more you talk about motivation as to why they need the annual report, what they hope to get out of it, what they CAN get out of it but didn’t know, what would happen if it was not done properly or if it was done in a conventional manner, etc.

    Invest 80% of your consultation time diagnosing the possibilities of turning and ordinary annual report into an extraordinary revenue enhancement and stealth marketing tool.

    Do it right and you will not need to itemise or make a big proposal. They won’t see you as a writer but an alchemist (words that sell).

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