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  • #1000438
    Nickbuilder94
    Member
    • Total posts: 1

    Hi all,

    Coming from a trade background, me and my business partner have recently aquired a builders licence to perform renovations here in victoria. We are able to complete some of the work ourselves which helps keep the price fair and competitive, however without a kitchen showroom it is difficult to compete with larger companies to win projects and I am also wanting to manage and step away from the tools – as is usually done by larger companies.

    My first question is –
    Do you have any creative ideas on what type of services to offer? – for example, kitchen or bathroom specific renovations, handyman service as well, complete home renovations, free designs etc.

    Second Question –
    How would we compete with projects from larger renovation contractors or companies that may have a show room.

    Third –
    How do I compete with a Marketing budget from another company that is beyond my own budget?

    Finally –
    How would I take the business from ‘building contractor’ mode, to ‘management of renovations’, note this would require a higher margin to pay for trades and to compete succesfully it would put us in the same price range as a company with a show room which I think would make it difficult to remain competitive and win projects as we don’t have one.

    thanks everyone

    #1224361
    Paul – FS Concierge
    Keymaster
    • Total posts: 3,183

    Hi and welcome to Flying Solo Nick!

    Thank you for joining and posting today.

    Some suggestions:

    1.
    A. Complete kitchen and bathroom renovations in hi-rises. Market them to a price point.
    b. Enclosed decks with windows, fans, TV’s kitchens or BBQ’s etc
    c. Look at the government incentives and work up some ideas around the minimum threshold that the government incentive kicks in.

    2.
    A. Have a great website that showcases your ideas, then as you get jobs do web diaries of Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 etc Tell the customer story and how happy they are with the finished product.
    B. See 1 above. Find a niche and don’t compete directly.

    3. Target the niche so that your marketing spend is lower but has higher impact and ROI

    4. Great businesses are built over time, not overnight. Stake Steps 1 & 2 & 3 before 8,9,10. Keep long term plans in mind but stage them. This is something to think about being ready to do in possibly a few years time and there are a million and one problems you will have to solve first. Operate for 6-12 months and come back to this idea.

    Good luck Nick

    Cheers
    Paul

    #1224362
    bb1
    Participant
    • Total posts: 4,485
    Nickbuilder94, post: 271257, member: 119405 wrote:
    Second Question –
    How would we compete with projects from larger renovation contractors or companies that may have a show room.

    Quality, customer service, quality and even better customer service. Big business’s all fail at this.

    Nickbuilder94, post: 271257, member: 119405 wrote:
    Third –
    How do I compete with a Marketing budget from another company that is beyond my own budget?

    If you achieve the quality and customer service angle you wont need a advertsing budget, word of mouth will have you over run with work. Sadly most business’s fail on the quality and customer service angle, and therefor fail at word of mouth.

    #1224363
    Dave Gillen – FS Concierge
    Keymaster
    • Total posts: 2,560

    [USER=119405]@Nickbuilder94[/USER] Some ideas…

    1) Start where you have the most experience, and are the most knowledgeable. You can use this experience in your marketing, and your conversations with clients.

    2) If you do the above, you’ll naturally be a strong choice. Even without a showroom, you can showcase your past work (with photos, videos, or even by describing the work and the problems you solved for the client). Use each proposal/quote to show how many different aspects of the job you’ll take care of for them.

    3) Now that you have a focus, and an area of expertise, you can focus your marketing on these certain job types or certain customers. You don’t try to compete with larger marketing budgets, just find a small patch of turf to win.

    4) Maybe work up to this last one, once you’ve proven yourself and managed some small projects. Once you can showcase your projects and your happy customers.

    Good luck!
    Dave

    Dave Gillen - Client Acquisition | Brisbane | (07) 3180 0288
    #1224364
    SME Design
    Participant
    • Total posts: 14

    Hello Nick,
    I can report on my experience with a couple of clients in this niche but one in particular. This client of mine previously performed all home renos and handyman work.
    He now focuses on Bathrooms and will do Laundry at the same time.
    Why? Higher margin and focus on these specialist areas.

    I will answer based on my clients experience not my opinions.

    My client has 3-6 months work ahead of him. All work is from his high ranking website and word of mouth.
    He did advertise, but when the website started ranking number one for the major searches, further advertising was not required.
    We focused on his experience of 20 years as a carpenter specialising in renos.

    No showroom required.

    The website has copy such as
    Saving You Money – Low Overheads
    Another thing I can tell you is that our overhead costs are kept low. We accomplish this in a couple of ways.
    First, we don’t have a huge warehouse with a giant showroom displaying millions of dollars of inventory to impress you. The savings from that gets passed on to you.

    Our reputation and that of the exceptional products we use on my bathroom renovation projects allows me to pass even more savings on to you.
    Consult directly with the proprietor.

    How would I take the business from ‘building contractor’ mode, to ‘management of renovations’

    I would suggest expanding slowly and have a look at how the building companies do it.
    You would slowly become less “on the Tools” over time.

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