Home – New Forums Tech talk Safari on iMac query

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #972534
    fredfarcle
    Member
    • Total posts: 181
    Up
    0
    ::

    I’ve just set up an iMac for the business I share an office with.

    Have tried help files in Safari but can’t find a way to get “Fullscreen” short of dragging the browser handles, either in the menu or keyboard shortcuts.

    I normally use Linux and F11 gives fullscreen in all compatible browsers, F11 does volume on the Mac.

    Is there a way to do this in Safari easily.

    Cheers

    #1056661
    victorng
    Member
    • Total posts: 626
    Up
    0
    ::

    Unfortunately not. Fullscreen has never been possible on Safari. I read an explanation of why once but it didn’t really make sense and I can’t even remember the reason now.

    There are plugins you can use to make Safari go fullscreen. Saft is one.

    Cheers,
    Victor

    #1056662
    fredfarcle
    Member
    • Total posts: 181
    Up
    0
    ::

    Thanks for that, guess they’ll have to get used to it.

    Apart from that a mighty impressive machine, never used one before, makes a Macbook Air even more tempting.

    Currently there’s an argument going on over who gets to use it, it’s already converted 2 hardcore XP users in a hour.

    Browser quirks will soon be forgotten.

    #1056663
    John C.
    Member
    • Total posts: 439
    Up
    0
    ::

    Yeah I don’t fully understand the reason why there is no full screen in Safari either. I think the intention is that clicking the “maximise” button will make the window as large as it needs to be based on the content of the window, so there’s no reason for full screen.

    Firefox has a full screen option in the View menu and a keyboard shortcut of Command-Shift-F does the same thing. In my opinion it’s a better browser too, but that’s subjective.

    I bought my first Mac laptop about 18 months ago and love it. After a lifetime of PCs I only go to my PC desktop when I really need to now.

    Cheers,
    John

    #1056664
    victorng
    Member
    • Total posts: 626
    Up
    0
    ::
    bitsa, post: 69571 wrote:
    Apart from that a mighty impressive machine, never used one before, makes a Macbook Air even more tempting.

    Yes, do it!

    My primary machine is a 13″ MacBook Air (hooked up to two monitors when in the office) and it sings along beautifully. Even runs a Windows 7 VM no trouble.

    #1056665
    fredfarcle
    Member
    • Total posts: 181
    Up
    0
    ::

    I’ve used nothing but Linux as a primary OS for over 4 years now, primarily Ubuntu on both desktop and laptop.

    The move to “Unity” instead of Gnome as the desktop on Ubuntu is very Mac in feel but nowhere near as slick.

    Have been trying to move a couple of clients away from Windows (got sick of trying to help them maintain their machines) Ubuntu was a step too far for them, mainly an addiction to Microsoft office, so the Mac was a nice compromise, they’re now fighting amongst themselves as to who gets stuck with the remaining Windows machine.

    It’s also given me a chance to play with a Mac.

    I’ll let them persevere with Safari for a bit, it’s a good lesson in coming to grips with more than one browser and making an informed judgement on which is better for them, rather than just using IE because it’s familiar, after they’re fully weaned I’l suggest they try Firefox or Chrome.

    I actually use Chrome as my default browser now and find all the others a bit top heavy, it integrates well with Google Apps and my only real add on’s are speed dial and mail notification.

    #1056666
    Michael [The Mac Experts]
    Member
    • Total posts: 40
    Up
    0
    ::

    “Full screen” isn’t a user interface paradigm that makes sense, in my opinion. It always bazoosles me when I see Windows users working in full screen mode for absolutely no benefit, and it frustrates me even more when they are constantly wasting a few seconds switching between windows.

    The notion of full screening an application is to make available the maximum amount of the interface available, but no more, which is exactly what the maximus buttons on most Mac OS X application do.

    Think about it this way: why would you want to maximum a website to full screen just to have 40% of the edges of your screen with absolutely no value of use whatsoever?

    Therefore “maximum” will make adjust the browser window to an optimum width (maximum) of the website to adequately fit in the content, leaving you room to fit other useful applications.

    #1056667
    fredfarcle
    Member
    • Total posts: 181
    Up
    0
    ::
    macexperts_michael, post: 69701 wrote:
    “Full screen” isn’t a user interface paradigm that makes sense, in my opinion. It always bazoosles me when I see Windows users working in full screen mode for absolutely no benefit, and it frustrates me even more when they are constantly wasting a few seconds switching between windows.

    The notion of full screening an application is to make available the maximum amount of the interface available, but no more, which is exactly what the maximus buttons on most Mac OS X application do.

    Think about it this way: why would you want to maximum a website to full screen just to have 40% of the edges of your screen with absolutely no value of use whatsoever?

    Therefore “maximum” will make adjust the browser window to an optimum width (maximum) of the website to adequately fit in the content, leaving you room to fit other useful applications.

    I agree up to a point, especially if the browser is smart enough to do this, a lot of it is habit on small screens, eg laptops.

    To me the benefit of a large screen is to have more than one document open but sometimes, say if building a webpage, I like to check it in fullscreen because I know a percentage of users view this way.

    One thing that I do find useful in Linux is multiple desktops, I usually have at least two and sometimes four on the go, especially on a laptop.

    Might sound a bit silly but if I’m working in something like Ruby on Rails I’d have 2 terminals running, an editor come file manager open, a web browser plus a reference guide.

    I also measure a lot of construction drawings off the screen. The PDF’s have to be at 100% to scale properly and fullscreen (on a 24″ monitor) only gets about half the page and I might need to have three or four open at once, so fullscreen does have some legitimate uses.

    #1056668
    Michael [The Mac Experts]
    Member
    • Total posts: 40
    Up
    0
    ::

    You’re aware that Mac OS X has Spaces?, which is equivalent to multiple/virtual desktops on Gnome/KDE.

    Apple -> System Preferences -> Expose & Spaces.

    Sorry if you knew that, I’m just assuming from the tone of your post that you wish Mac OS X had some type of equivalent feature, which it does.

    #1056669
    John C.
    Member
    • Total posts: 439
    Up
    0
    ::
    macexperts_michael, post: 69701 wrote:
    “Full screen” isn’t a user interface paradigm that makes sense, in my opinion. It always bazoosles me when I see Windows users working in full screen mode for absolutely no benefit, and it frustrates me even more when they are constantly wasting a few seconds switching between windows.

    The notion of full screening an application is to make available the maximum amount of the interface available, but no more, which is exactly what the maximus buttons on most Mac OS X application do.

    Think about it this way: why would you want to maximum a website to full screen just to have 40% of the edges of your screen with absolutely no value of use whatsoever?

    Therefore “maximum” will make adjust the browser window to an optimum width (maximum) of the website to adequately fit in the content, leaving you room to fit other useful applications.

    One reason that full screen is a better option for me, than the “maximise to the required size” feature available in Mac OS X, is that often I’ll maximise a browser window with a dozen or so tabs open, and it maximises to the correct size for the active tab, which is not necessarily large enough for subsequent tabs that I click on. Why should I have to maximise again for each tab?

    The second reason that full screen is often a better option for me, is that it removes the distraction of any desktop items or other windows when I’m trying to focus on the content of a single website.

    I love Mac OS X, and think that many aspects of it are far superior to what’s available on Windows, but this “feature” is one which I can’t see any sense in. It’s only my opinion though (and that of maybe a dozen or so of my customers and friends), and not that big a deal in the grand scheme of things.

    #1056670
    IgniteDM
    Member
    • Total posts: 99
    Up
    0
    ::
    macexperts_michael, post: 69728 wrote:
    You’re aware that Mac OS X has Spaces?, which is equivalent to multiple/virtual desktops on Gnome/KDE.

    Apple -> System Preferences -> Expose & Spaces.

    Sorry if you knew that, I’m just assuming from the tone of your post that you wish Mac OS X had some type of equivalent feature, which it does.

    Took me a while to get used to Spaces, even when Ive been a dedicated Mac user for more than a year now. But once I got the hang of it – OMG ! Awesome !

    Dont use it as much now im on a 27″ iMac with a 24″ monitor hanging off that as well as I have plenty of screen space. But when using my 13″ macbook, its a total winner !

    P.S safari is balls – stick to Firefox 4 – its awesome !

    #1056671
    fredfarcle
    Member
    • Total posts: 181
    Up
    0
    ::
    macexperts_michael, post: 69728 wrote:
    You’re aware that Mac OS X has Spaces?, which is equivalent to multiple/virtual desktops on Gnome/KDE.

    Apple -> System Preferences -> Expose & Spaces.

    Sorry if you knew that, I’m just assuming from the tone of your post that you wish Mac OS X had some type of equivalent feature, which it does.

    Total Mac experience can be measured in minutes, so I didn’t know, will check it out next time I can get near the machine.

    I need to explore the directory structure too, I’m assuming being Unix cousins it’s similar to Linux.

    There is a couple of folders on the task/app launcher but I’m not sure if they were created by the MS Office install done by the sales guy.

    Looking more and more like I’ll have to get one of my own to play with.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.