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  • #992797
    TehCamel
    Member
    • Total posts: 873

    If I understand correctly (and it’s highly possible I don’t) – content is particularly important to site rankings.

    I have a pre-canned site, that has approximately 40 posts. These are cross-linked to twitter, so when they post, it tweets with a link.

    My question is, am I better off just publishing them all at once, or on a schedule, like one a week, 2 a week, one a fortnight

    #1188204
    kangaroojosh
    Member
    • Total posts: 64

    I’ll give you my opinion on this. I think its better off scheduling posts to have some sort of activity alive on the blog regularly. However, I am not a huge fan of pre-canned content published on to a blog unless they are throughly keyword researched articles capable of at least driving long tail traffic on to the blog or engaging readers.

    I think it would be a great idea to have a writer adding blog posts onto the blog with immediate relevance and engaging users to stay subscribed, driving engagement and lower bounces.

    cheers,
    Josh

    #1188205
    John Romaine
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,104

    I’m not sure what you mean by “pre-canned”?

    Without writing a 2,000 word response about the importance of content and how it is critical to SEO, I’m going to just answer your questions…

    TehCamel, post: 220626, member: 7341 wrote:
    If I understand correctly (and it’s highly possible I don’t) – content is particularly important to site rankings.

    Yes.

    You should be publishing extremely high quality content that –

    • demonstrates your expertise and knowledge within your field
    • answers and addresses your customers most frequently asked questions, and pain points
    • pre sells your products and services (here’s a problem, here’s how I can solve it)
    • provides clearly actionable guidance and advice

    “Good content” is not enough. You’ll want to be creating what I call “linkable assets”. That is, content, or resources that leave a visitor saying “Wow, that was incredibly useful, I’ll have to share this OR link to this”.

    I say “resources”, because quite often, site owners limit their thinking to “written content” only. Instead, you’ll want to be thinking much broader and be providing –

    • Videos
    • Podcasts
    • Checklists, cheat sheets, PDFs
    • Online tools, calculators
    • Free software
    • Interactive surveys, games etc

    Essentially, you’ll want to absolutely destroy your competition and hog any chances of acquiring inbound links because your stuff is 10X better than anything your competitors are doing.

    With the right strategy, and approach this is doable.

    TehCamel, post: 220626, member: 7341 wrote:
    My question is, am I better off just publishing them all at once, or on a schedule, like one a week, 2 a week, one a fortnight

    Frequency. Good question….

    Forget about publishing to a schedule that might satisfy Google and start publishing to a schedule that will help your readers.

    The worst thing you can do is publish 40 blog posts, then go quiet for a year. I see this all the time and its pretty sad. Go look at any business blog and many will show their latest blog post being over a year or more older.

    Inconsistency will kill you.

    Get into a habit of publishing as frequently as possible, but don’t sacrifice quality. You’re much better off publishing something that is absolutely incredible once a month, as opposed to publishing crap every 30 minutes.

    Always put quality ahead of quantity.

    Hope this helps. Trust me, this is the very short version.

    #1188206
    JimmyD
    Member
    • Total posts: 23

    Hey Teh,

    I like Neil Patels approach on this one. Here is a scheduling picture of when to post: image233.png

    #1188207
    John Romaine
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,104
    kangaroojosh, post: 220631, member: 59996 wrote:
    …unless they are throughly keyword researched articles capable of at least driving long tail traffic on to the blog or engaging readers.

    This might surprise you given that I work in the SEO space, but I never perform keyword research ahead of publishing an article or recording a podcast. I always publish the best, most useful piece of content I can, thinking only of my audience.

    Upon publishing though, I use a strategy called “keyword mashing” which I won’t go into here, but it allows me to optimise a natural piece of content for many phrases.

    Always publish for humans and optimise for search engines, not the other way round.

    #1188208
    JimmyD
    Member
    • Total posts: 23
    John Romaine, post: 220635, member: 39536 wrote:
    This might surprise you given that I work in the SEO space, but I never perform keyword research ahead of publishing an article or recording a podcast.

    Do you mean in terms of optimizing it before you publish it? I tend to do keyword research to know what I want to write about. I completely agree with you making your content completely user friendly as your first goal.

    #1188209
    John Romaine
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,104
    JimmyD, post: 220636, member: 53447 wrote:
    Do you mean in terms of optimizing it before you publish it? I tend to do keyword research to know what I want to write about. I completely agree with you making your content completely user friendly as your first goal.

    I publish strictly for humans. I might do 2 minutes of keyword research AFTER I’ve published in order to add relevant terms to my meta description tag.

    Don’t use keyword research to find inspiration for content.

    It will bore you to tears. Instead look at what your competitors are doing, and what active discussions are happening within your industry.

    Much like this one :)

    #1188210
    kangaroojosh
    Member
    • Total posts: 64
    John Romaine, post: 220635, member: 39536 wrote:
    This might surprise you given that I work in the SEO space, but I never perform keyword research ahead of publishing an article or recording a podcast. I always publish the best, most useful piece of content I can, thinking only of my audience.
    .

    Good point John, but this is very subjective in my option! Your approach certainly makes sense because you already have your audience and its more important to write for your audience. But imagine a new blog or a website trying to tap into or enter a niche through blog posts. With less authority wouldn’t it be smarter to keyword research to identify those micro niches, topics that has demand but lesser quality supply? An extensive keyword research can surprise you with the search volume and again surprise you with the quality of the top ranking results (lower competition).

    Such pockets are great entry points compared to writing content that are already dominated with good resources. Especially for low authority, relatively new websites.

    John Romaine, post: 220635, member: 39536 wrote:
    Upon publishing though, I use a strategy called “keyword mashing” which I won’t go into here, but it allows me to optimise a natural piece of content for many phrases.
    .

    Agree! Post publishing, its definitely a solid approach to analyse the attention you are receiving and what your content is ranking for and further fine tune.

    And totally agree about writing for your readers! But keyword research can certainly pave path for entry points to your website and then guide them to comprehensive articles that cant stand competition but offer great value which might organically attract more authority later.

    Cheers
    Josh

    #1188211
    John Romaine
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,104
    kangaroojosh, post: 220638, member: 59996 wrote:
    Your approach certainly makes sense because you already have your audience

    You build your audience through becoming known in your space. That comes about via many ways –

    • being where your audience already is
    • doing good work
    • helping people
    • publishing exceptionally high quality content and resources
    • outreach and guest appearances
    • networking
    • not moving the lollipop (ask me)
    kangaroojosh, post: 220638, member: 59996 wrote:
    wouldn’t it be smarter to keyword research to identify those micro niches, topics that has demand but lesser quality supply?

    Not really.

    It makes much more sense to reverse engineer what your competitors are doing that’s already proven in your space, and work towards replicating and improving.

    It makes no sense to perform tireless hours of keyword research and spend 2 days publishing an article only to find out no one gives a rats.

    #1188212
    JohnW
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,642

    Hi Tehcamel,
    It seems the SEO discussions above are based on an expectation that SE referrals are driven by the isolated pages published on a website.

    IMHO, WRONG!

    Do a Google search for: mens ties

    To all the SEOs commenting above, please explain to Tehcamel why a 55 page website ranks #1 when a 195,000 page site ranks #2.

    Tehcamel, you are putting the cart before the horse with your emphasis on individual page content and a proposed publishing strategy.

    SEO must start with identifying the different types of customers you want to attract. (Content must be RELEVANT to them.) Then there is an assessment of the level of online competition in your market.

    Next are the SEO strategies and tactics that you have the resources to support. (A certain level of SE knowledge is essential at this point.)

    Social media as a communication channel may be an important issue but I’m not going to address that here.

    Your post jumps into a level of SEO implementation that ignores essential procedures and precursors.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1188213
    Cesar
    Member
    • Total posts: 591

    You have to ask yourself the question, “How much can I write on a particular subject, before it starts sounding repetitive?”

    #1188214
    John Romaine
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,104
    Cesar, post: 220677, member: 4052 wrote:
    You have to ask yourself the question, “How much can I write on a particular subject, before it starts sounding repetitive?”

    It only becomes repetitive if you let it.

    There are people making millions by publishing content about the most trivial of subject matter. Put in some thought and effort.

    #1188215
    GuestMember
    Member
    • Total posts: 318

    I’m assuming here that you’re going to add new content. Even drip-feeding 40 posts will run out in 40 weeks max, and done at the ideal frequency, 12-20 weeks. Letting the site fester isn’t a good idea.

    All the above is right. Polarised debates are often like that. Rather than Either/Or, think Both/And. Research keywords, but don’t expect it to necessarily hit the big time and don’t spend hours on it. Aim to fill niche areas on some posts, writing evergreen content that will get a foothold in the industry. But don’t write epic pieces all the time. It has to be sustainable.

    Write for humans not robots but still plan as you write so that the key phrases are there. Your customer is at the heart of everything but writing for the robots means writing for humans if it is in the spirit of helping customers. After all, search engines are there to find the information customers ask for. So, if we have the customers pain points, desires for entertainment, need for information, etc., at heart, we’re writing for both robots and humans. There’s no need to choose. Just don’t be excessive in either direction and ignorant of the other.

    More than anything else, people writing content must meet both customers needs and their own passions. Millions of sites and blogs a year dry up after the initial output and enthusiasm. It must be sustainable and like a puppy, it’s not just for christmas. Even if no one else likes your puppy initially, you still have to feed it until they warm to it.

    #1188216
    TehCamel
    Member
    • Total posts: 873

    Thank you all for the feedback, I’m totally on the wrong track then it seems :)

    #1188217
    GuestMember
    Member
    • Total posts: 318

    Are you concerned about writing new posts Andy? Time? I have some nice ideas to share if so.

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