Home – New Forums Marketing mastery Strategies to gather interest

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #987348
    gareths
    Member
    • Total posts: 31
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi everyone.

    Just wondering if anyone knows of an effective way to quickly gather interest in a small business.

    The majority of my marketing has come through online means. I am listed on a number of free business directories and some paid ones.

    I also send out a lot of emails each week to people in related fields to me, but after talking to a business consultant today I’ve learnt that’s actually spam and illegal if unsolicited.

    He recommended using the phone, mail, phone technique. Calling a potential client or intermediary and asking for the details of the person in charge and then sending them a formal letter in the post before following up with them down the track.

    This is a laborious and time consuming task that I don’t want to do. I am so used to emailing and in this day and age, who actually writes letters any more.
    He says it’s guaranteed to work, but I have to put time and effort into it over a number of weeks and months. I want clients now, not in six months time.

    On the other hand, I am not getting far with the bulk email tactic and now that I know it is spam, I have to stop it.

    #1162264
    John C.
    Member
    • Total posts: 439
    Up
    0
    ::

    G’day Gareth,

    Just on the point of unsolicited emails… there is a clause in the legislation that talks about inferred consent. If a business or person lists a work related email address on a website or business card, then sending them emails related to their work is not considered spam (as long as you abide by the other rules).

    Here is the relevant quote from the Spam Act 2003:

    when an addressee has conspicuously published their electronic address. In such a case the
    Spam Act permits commercial electronic messagesto be sent to the addressee, if the message
    relates to the addressee’s published employment function or role. If a plumber advertises their
    email address, it is okay to send them offers of work or of plumbing supplies, but not to send
    an offer unrelated to their work, such as cheap pharmaceuticals. If the published address is
    accompanied by a statement saying that it should not be used for such messages, such as the
    words “no spam”, then it cannot be used to infer consent to a message being sent;
    • similarly, when an addressee has provided a business card containing their electronic address,
    it would be a reasonable expectation on both sides that relevant messages would be sent to
    that electronic address. For example, if the business card was provided for work purposes then
    it would not be reasonable to infer that the addressee consented to receiving messages from
    you which are unrelated to their work.

    Something to consider if you are gathering email addresses from company websites and the like – you may not be breaking the law at all.

    I know that if I receive a single targeted email from another local business with an offer relevant to my industry (whether or not I’m in a position to take advantage of that offer at that time), I don’t consider the email spam. If, on the other hand, the email is obviously unrelated to my business, or the emails continue excessively, then I start to get annoyed. I think this is the spirit of the anti-spam legislation and something else to consider when deciding whether to give up on your email marketing.

    Cheers,
    John

    #1162265
    gareths
    Member
    • Total posts: 31
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi John.

    Thanks for the information. It certainly changes my thinking, and I can’t see any reason why what I am doing would be illegal as it is only ever business related email.

    I will pass this on to the business consultant I spoke to today and see what he says.

    Appreciate the comments.

    #1162266
    Tony Manto
    Participant
    • Total posts: 581
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Gareth, unfortunately there is no magic bullet… If there was, we would all be doing it. Email, forum, mail, networking… all the usual stuff. However the strategy you use and the way you deliver it can make a big difference.

    I see business owners all the time spending thousands of dollars on marketing and advertising but don’t have the right message or structure. Their call to action isn’t compelling and therefore it doesn’t work as well as it could.

    Make sure you have a compelling strategy…

    #1162267
    gareths
    Member
    • Total posts: 31
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Tony.

    Unfortunately my approach to marketing is all over the place. Sometimes I email out, other times it’s through networking and pre-existing connections.

    I don’t really have a set approach or a strategy. At the moment I just put the bait out there and hope someone takes it.

    #1162268
    gareths
    Member
    • Total posts: 31
    Up
    0
    ::
    John C., post: 187529 wrote:
    G’day Gareth,

    Just on the point of unsolicited emails… there is a clause in the legislation that talks about inferred consent. If a business or person lists a work related email address on a website or business card, then sending them emails related to their work is not considered spam (as long as you abide by the other rules).

    Here is the relevant quote from the Spam Act 2003:

    when an addressee has conspicuously published their electronic address. In such a case the
    Spam Act permits commercial electronic messagesto be sent to the addressee, if the message
    relates to the addressee’s published employment function or role. If a plumber advertises their
    email address, it is okay to send them offers of work or of plumbing supplies, but not to send
    an offer unrelated to their work, such as cheap pharmaceuticals. If the published address is
    accompanied by a statement saying that it should not be used for such messages, such as the
    words “no spam”, then it cannot be used to infer consent to a message being sent;
    • similarly, when an addressee has provided a business card containing their electronic address,
    it would be a reasonable expectation on both sides that relevant messages would be sent to
    that electronic address. For example, if the business card was provided for work purposes then
    it would not be reasonable to infer that the addressee consented to receiving messages from
    you which are unrelated to their work.

    Something to consider if you are gathering email addresses from company websites and the like – you may not be breaking the law at all.

    I know that if I receive a single targeted email from another local business with an offer relevant to my industry (whether or not I’m in a position to take advantage of that offer at that time), I don’t consider the email spam. If, on the other hand, the email is obviously unrelated to my business, or the emails continue excessively, then I start to get annoyed. I think this is the spirit of the anti-spam legislation and something else to consider when deciding whether to give up on your email marketing.

    Cheers,
    John

    I asked my business consultant but he says it’s a big risk to assume that the email recipient consents to the information, regardless of whether they have their address published or not.

    He says more and more people are tired of being emailed by people and businesses they’ve never heard of and the emails are going straight to the trash.

    I need to ask myself “is this the most effective and professional way to project my business to potential clients”

    I am introverted and not good talking to strangers on the phone or face to face so email works well for me, but if it is not going to generate leads, I guess the answer to the question above is no.

    #1162269
    Tony Manto
    Participant
    • Total posts: 581
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Gareth, I agree that email marketing is losing its effectiveness and unsolicited emails are going to trash or getting deleted.

    Everything old is now again…

    Even though mail marketing is so yesterday, I believe that that’s what makes it work a try. A well written marketing letter can evoke a response. The bottom line is if you are not good at talking to people in a cold call situation, this will effect your chances of success. Having said that, the important principle here is if you are week at something you may need to pay someone to do that for you. There are many people out there now that do social media marketing and also there are people that will do telemarketing.

    Doing things all over the place is not the problem, doing things using the right strategy is more important.

    #1162270
    Jenny Spring
    Member
    • Total posts: 597
    Up
    0
    ::
    gareths, post: 187531 wrote:
    Hi John.

    Thanks for the information. It certainly changes my thinking, and I can’t see any reason why what I am doing would be illegal as it is only ever business related email.

    I will pass this on to the business consultant I spoke to today and see what he says.

    Appreciate the comments.

    Hi Gareth

    John is right, and it is a pity that people don’t read the laws, instead of guess what they are.

    People get muddled between the difference of being annoying, or being a spammer.

    If you are emailing other business owners with a product/service that is relevant to them, and they have their email address published on their website then you are legal. However, if you email content that they don’t care about, then you are annoying.

    Your strategy to start with a ‘cold email’ is an excellent one. What might be the problem is that the email you are sending isn’t effective. Also, you are giving up too early. Persistence is key, and using a series of well thought out emails will work brilliantly.

    With these emails, I would suggest you set up your campaign to offer them an incentive to ‘opt in’ and get to know you better.

    As an email strategist, I can confirm that this truly works very well.

    If you haven’t had success with that prospect within 3 months, it is unlikely you will in the future. So you’ve got a short window, but can reap great rewards.

    The key is effective use with persuasive language aimed at the right profile.

    I’d love to help you with this?

    #1162271
    Stuart B
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,070
    Up
    0
    ::

    I think your business consultant needs to read the spam act so he can give better advice. If you read the section about consent, it’s very clear what you can and cannot do.
    I’m not talking about effectiveness of what you’re doing, i’m just commenting on being within the law. If you’re really worried talk to a lawyer but a 30 min read over the law will easily indicate if you’re ok or not. It’s a pretty straight forward read.

    The thing I always tell cliets about their marketing is how to develop the strategy, which soudnds like where your issues stem from.

    Start at the end, meaning where you want to be in 12 months time for example. That will tell you how many clients you need to have, and from there you can break down how many clients you want to get from any given activity.

    It’s ok to have a range of methods for gaining clients, but you need to have small incremental, measurable goals so you know if you’re on track and not just running round with your head cut off.

    Once you have that you can really draw up a pretty neat plan of what needs to be done day to day to meet those goals, and you’ll know yourself if you’re being slack or not.

    It is tough when you’re an introvert but networking can be so valuable and once you get started it’s very easy. I’ve started getting involved a lot in meetup.com and it’s been a great experience for the most part.

    #1162272
    Justin Laju
    Member
    • Total posts: 89
    Up
    0
    ::
    gareths, post: 187523 wrote:
    Hi everyone.

    Just wondering if anyone knows of an effective way to quickly gather interest in a small business.

    The majority of my marketing has come through online means. I am listed on a number of free business directories and some paid ones.

    I also send out a lot of emails each week to people in related fields to me, but after talking to a business consultant today I’ve learnt that’s actually spam and illegal if unsolicited.

    He recommended using the phone, mail, phone technique. Calling a potential client or intermediary and asking for the details of the person in charge and then sending them a formal letter in the post before following up with them down the track.

    This is a laborious and time consuming task that I don’t want to do. I am so used to emailing and in this day and age, who actually writes letters any more.
    He says it’s guaranteed to work, but I have to put time and effort into it over a number of weeks and months. I want clients now, not in six months time.

    On the other hand, I am not getting far with the bulk email tactic and now that I know it is spam, I have to stop it.

    Hi Gareth!

    You are not alone. Almost every small business faces the same issues, thanks for sharing.

    His advice is sound. Your issue is a mental and emotional one – which is making your feel that results are 6mnths away with that approach.

    But, you can easily substitute the snail mail letter for an email and get similar results.

    I’m unsure if you are targeting local or national businesses – but either way, it is about relationship engineering.

    If you are targeting local businesses, then calling them to set up a time to go and visit is far more tangible for most prospects – and once you are there with them…well, possession is 9/10 of the law. Once you have rapport and, provided there is good fit – they then have a relationship with you and the transition to “client” is much easier.

    So, while it is laborious – what is being asked of you by the universe is to make it more real. Make it so you have less distance between you and them – and then they can feel you.

    If you don’t like doing the calls, you can someone else to make them.

    But it works either way. But the essential ingredient is belief.

    If you can’t go out and see them – then call to make a time for a demo/meeting over the phone.

    If you are pumping the emails out and it doesn’t yield, then you just need to ground the process, because they (prospects) can’t feel close enough to it to be enticed.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.