Home – New Forums Tech talk telephone systems – where to start?

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  • #978230
    AgentMail
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    Hi All,

    We are shortly going to be moving premises and I am trawling the net trying to find some useful information about phone systems… I am striking out!

    Basically, our new premises has an upstairs and downstairs office and a warehouse.

    The previous tenant had a full phone system installed, but I am not sure what I should be going for. Essentially, there is only 2 of us in the office. I wanted to have a phone upstairs, one downstairs and one in the warehouse.

    At the same time, I don’t really want the added expense of multiple phone line rentals. Is there something that can work? I thought about just going for a normal phone with two cordless handsets, but felt maybe this was not the best method for a growing business.

    I think I understand that the only way to have a phone system is to have multiple phone lines going in, and I am not sure if I need to make that step just yet.

    Any advice happily received.

    #1105563
    Tamper Evident
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    #1 tip: Don’t lock in for long term contracts to receive discounts today.

    Telstra offer 10/15% discount if you sign up for 5 years. That does not support a growing or changing business and won’t let you take advantage of beter pricing in the future from competition.

    #2 tip: You might be able to bundle your broadband with one phone line for free calls, plus add another phone line.

    #1105564
    GailH
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    A couple of things you can consider.

    If you want to stick with using the copper phone lines that are already there, you can often reduce costs by switching to an ISDN service. Regular phone connections (PSTN) are one line to one handset. With ISDN you can share a number of incoming lines between multiple handsets. That means that you can get two incoming lines (to allow both of you to use the phone at the same time), but have those lines service ALL of your phones.

    If you’re willing to make the jump to VoIP, a hosted PBX is probably the cheapest option. As with ISDN, there are many plans out there where you just pay for the number of incoming lines and you can plug in as many handsets as you want. These have the advantage that they often bundle useful things in for free, so are more of a total telephone solution.

    Pretty much any telco can help you with ISDN lines. Here’s someone who can help you with hosted PBX http://hostedpbx.net.au/. I like their system because you get a self-management portal and can do your own configuration. (There are lots of other hosted PBX folk out there too.)

    #1105565
    Geronimo
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    If you have good internet speeds (anything over 1500), look at virtual PABX services, or just multiple VoIP numbers id you want each phone to have it’s own number.

    This sort of thing..
    http://www.internode.on.net/business/phone_services/nodephone/hosted_pabx/
    or
    https://www.mynetfone.com.au/Business/Phone/Solution-Options/small-office-phone-system

    I think you’d have to have a very good reason to go to an in house physical PABX solution though. Expensive to install, maintain and upgrade.

    Good luck.

    #1105566
    bluepenguin
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    I’d go for VoIP.

    I use mynetfone (1 line only) and am very happy with the service. Plus it only costs me about $10 a month. Oh, and I still use my normal phone and there’s no difference to a conventional phone line, except my voicemail gets email to me.

    #1105567
    rorrock
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    I run a voip system that is easy to use, has 5 incoming lines, IVR Promting, Voicemail, and ACD queues…
    Most of this you wont use, but its there when you want to..
    Drop me a line if you want one like it.

    Regards,
    Rob

    #1105568
    Ytelco
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    Hi Agent.

    As others have mentioned, a hosted voice product might be suitable as it will provide greater scope for growth… Additional users can be added for a lot less than traditional fixed lines.

    Hosted Voice performs best with a dedicated ADSL connection although depending on your data use, this might not be essential. Call quality can be affected if you use the same connection for data and voice.

    Initially, pricing won’t be much different with only two users however as the business grows and you add additional users, HV should prove to be cheaper. You’ll still need a PSTN line for your ADSL service.

    Other options include standard VoIP (generally cheapest option) and ISDN2.

    As Tamper suggests, be careful with lengthy contracts. Signing up for 5 years might make it difficult to switch to NBN services when they become available in your area.

    #1105569
    ChyrillStucker
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    You can use one phone line and get multiple extensions using the same number through the PBX system. Since you need only a small number of extensions, buying the entire PBX equipment is not a feasible option. So, I would suggest you opt for Hosted PBX system that saves the cost of equipment and you can get many advanced calling features as well. Your current phone system can be integrated with the system. So, there is no additional expense of buying new phone systems.

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