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  • #994130
    Stuart B
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    Hey all I felt compelled to write this because it seems like every day I wake up and EVERYONE is asking the same exact question when it comes to social media marketing.

    So I took a lesson from my members only courses and decided to publish it online. I won’t post it here because it’ll probably be removed but here’s the gist…

    “WHY AREN’T MY FOLLOWERS BUYING ANYTHING FROM ME?”
    I get asked this several times a day, typically they’re referring to their facebook followers because that’s where people dabble in SMM the first time which is cool.

    While I’d like to say that I take a look at their facebook page and find a new and slightly puzzling reason why followers aren’t converting into customers the actual reason why they aren’t buying is EXACTLY THE SAME every single time… (At least it makes my job easy if not a little repetitive lol).

    It’s immediately obvious when I get to their FB page that all they EVER post about is their special offers, promotions, products, or the various other reasons why you should buy something from them. As a result they get zero interaction on any of their posts no matter if they have 50 followers or 1000 followers and here’s why…

    PEOPLE DON’T FOLLOW BRANDS TO GET SPECIAL OFFERS RAMMED INTO THEIR FACE ON A DAILY BASIS :D

    The reason why people follow brands is because they want an emotional connection and feel that the brand might have some content they’d like to see.

    So in order to satisfy this need in your followers you need to ADD VALUE with the content you post. Posting constantly about a new special offer only tells followers that you want their money, and that doesn’t sound like a relationship you want to be part of right?

    Generally I recommend a 7:1 ratio of value add posts vs self promo posts (or around 1 self promo each week) and this way you have plenty of opportunity to build trust and relationships with your followers, and then every now and then provide a reason to buy.

    At the end of the day you need to understand what your followers want (emotionally) and once you create a trusting relationship (by adding value) then you won’t have any trouble getting them to buy what you’re selling. In fact once you get to that point, in many cases you won’t even have to ask them to buy from you… :D

    Hope this helps someone out there :D :D :D

    #1195301
    Rowan@quaotic
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    Great post. I am always amazed that many small business owners don’t get that :)

    #1195302
    Byron Trzeciak
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    Interesting post Stuart, if you’re a fan of Gary Vee and the Ask Gary Vee show you’ll also here him discuss something very similar “There is no sale without the story; no knockout without the setup.” and it’s about focusing on content and context and continuous “value” jabs before the sale or “right hook”.

    I think the issue most businesses have on social media is that the content they’re creating isn’t very interesting. As you say it’s often more about the sell then it is about the value or it just doesn’t stand out against far more exciting content such as dogs doing backflips down water slides.

    The power of it can’t be ignored however. Just recently a client of mine received 30,000 impressions in transgender support support space and had a single Facebook update (image and text) that was seen by over 30,000 people when they had less than 300 followers to their page.

    It was topical and created opportunity for inspiration, opinions and support. Fortunately the 300 followers they had were able to generate significant social shares and likes to gain such attention.

    We also saw Flying Solo and a great example when they went viral for their “cup of tea” meme on Facebook.1 image and more than 14,000,000 impressions. Flying solo did however have a significant existing audience and take the audience away and it would have been interesting to compare results.

    So my point is that, businesses really need to find something significant for content to stand out on social platforms. In the B2B space I think this is a big challenge for how to create something that is interesting for people who are in “entertain me mode”.

    A survey from InsideSales.com highlighted it as a “high use and low lead generation channel” so I’m interesting to hear from more businesses on Flying Solo in the B2B space what they’re doing and whether they find it valuable for their business.

    #1195303
    Melanie183
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    Great post Stuart :)

    I definitely agree with Byron that most B2B brands have difficulty creating interesting content. However with a little bit of creativity and by putting a bit of thought behind it, I’m sure they could have a range of posts that add value. I’ve recently been listening to the Gimlet Media podcast ‘Surprisingly Awesome’ and that is a great example of hosting a whole 40 minute episode on something you’d think would be boring (e.g. Mold and adhesives) but is actually really interesting.

    It’s important to think about the overall strategy and positioning you want to convey for your brand before posting on a whim – as continually writing posts that get little engagement can be very damaging to future organic reach thanks to the Facebook algorithm. (Not that I am complaining though. I am very thankful that my newsfeed only shows the most popular and engaging posts thanks to the algorithm!)

    #1195304
    Stuart B
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    [USER=56118]@Byron Trzeciak[/USER] can you send me the link to the dog backflip waterslide thing? That sounds awesome! lol

    Seriously though I think the problem stems from a shift in mindset which most SMBs don’t go through when the make the move into social media. The old mentality of “I advertise and then you see the advertising and buy stuff” is how most operate when they go into SMM.

    But they don’t realise that on SM it’s not about you and your advertising anymore, it’s about relationships and trust.
    You wouldn’t enter into a relationship which a person who wanted you purely for your money, so why would you do it with a business?

    #1195305
    arrowwise
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    Great post Stuart. It’s not all about you and posting non stop look at advertisements me via your social media.

    Can social media replace your routine email newsletter? as a less intrusive form of regular communication when people get too many emails as it is?

    For some businesses is it adequate to accept that most of their followers are happy to be kept in the loop via social media, rather than hungry to also give back via active engagement and responding?

    #1195306
    Stuart B
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    I would say that social media and email marketing are quite different and neither really has the capacity to do the job of the other. So i wouldn’t ever recommend killing off one in favour of the other.

    #1195307
    Byron Trzeciak
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    I completely agree with the strategy, so I’m not debating that, and something I discuss on my own site frequently.

    My concerns are specifically with B2B and Social in that regardless of content it’s high effort and often providing the lowest return in terms of digital marketing channels. [USER=13406]@Kate Toon[/USER] might be the person I can best think of that is in a B2B space doing content and social media marketing well. In saying that even she might admit also that it’s a grey area with a number of B2C services that she offers.

    I also feel that one of the major reasons behind Kate’s success is not just her clever and witty writing but that she is using her personal brand. She might disagree.

    I do agree [USER=74387]@Melanie183[/USER] that forms of content such as podcast and video can definitely provide greater opportunity to build an audience. When you have an audience then I think businesses may find that channels like Facebook have a larger impact.

    Most businesses are marketing like it was 5 or 10 years ago.

    I’m very interested to hear of any businesses operating B2B on Flying Solo who can contribute Facebook, or any other social marketing platform, as a significant area for acquiring leads or customers for their business.

    #1195308
    Stuart B
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    For my business it’s almost exclusively done via social media in the B2B space.

    #1195309
    Byron Trzeciak
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    Which platforms are working best for your Stuart?

    #1195310
    Stuart B
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    It’s dominated by Facebook. I also use Linkedin a little bit but the type of SMBs I’m targeting aren’t super active there.

    I focus on creating content that I know my target audience will go “oh wow i really needed to know that”. I make videos because they auto play on Facebook and they’re easier to absorb than written articles, and a share the absolute bejeezus out of them on other business networking groups, and SMB pages etc.

    It has a pretty decent effect and I get a lot of sign ups out of it.

    #1195311
    Byron Trzeciak
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    I can see from your Tube Academy page that you have 92 followers, so would you say the majority of your new customers comes from the significant promotion you do in business networking and SMB groups? Is that something you can see in the data you track?

    Sorry for all the questions. It seems whichever path you go with content it requires significant promotion and what you’re saying is that it almost requires promotion of the promotion by doing even more on Facebook than just simply posting on your page.

    #1195312
    JohnW
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    Hi Stuart,
    It seems to me there are many potential answers to “WHY AREN’T MY FOLLOWERS BUYING ANYTHING FROM ME?“.

    Many reasons will have nothing to do with the content on Facebook.

    For a start there is the possibility that the “buying” metric is not being measured.

    Inability to measure social media ROI is still a huge problem for marketers.

    We haven’t been able to show the impact (of social media) yet = 20.0% to 75% of CMOs spread across 13 different industries.

    The following articles may contain useful answers for sceptical clients:

    1. Nov 15: 100 Quick And Snackable eCommerce Statistics

    One set of stats to consider from it:

    Device Favored for Shopping: Mobile Phones

    A mobile site would get you half of your traffic, though not most of your conversions. While it’s easy to browse through products on mobile phones people prefer desktops for security reasons.

    Online Spending by Device
    • PC (72%)
    • Tablet (13%)
    • Smartphone (15%)”

    2. Facebook is now a mobile phone medium

    3. Mobile Marketing Statistics compilation

    Every online marketer should find this a useful client education article of many relevant statistics.

    The bottom line question that is going begging…

    How does the client know their social media program is not working if awareness is created on Facebook but they then use direct access to the client’s site to purchase via desktop?

    4. Other e commerce marketing articles

    Sep 15: Industry benchmark conversion rates for 25 retail categories

    This reports e commerce conversion rates by various industries and other factors.

    Jun 15: Australians unlikely to follow brands on social media

    “Just 11% of Australians on social media are “very likely” to be following brands on social media, according to eMarketer research from Waggeer Edstrom Asia-Pacific.”

    Nov 15: Demographics of customer reasons to follow brands’ social accounts

    USA survey by age and gender of why people follow a brand on social media.

    The primary reasons are still discounts, specials, promotions, samples, competitions.

    Mar 15: Why People Unfollow Brands on Social Media

    This article reports issues like frequency and format of posting, hiding brand feeds, etc.

    Hope these help.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1195313
    Stuart B
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    Byron Trzeciak, post: 229829, member: 56118 wrote:
    I can see from your Tube Academy page that you have 92 followers, so would you say the majority of your new customers comes from the significant promotion you do in business networking and SMB groups? Is that something you can see in the data you track?

    Sorry for all the questions. It seems whichever path you go with content it requires significant promotion and what you’re saying is that it almost requires promotion of the promotion by doing even more on Facebook than just simply posting on your page.

    That’s ok mate. Yeah the page only has a very small following and still definitely in the growth phase at the moment. It grow by about 40% last week.
    Because I’m still building the audience on SM it means I have to promote the promotion in other places as you said, but as the SM audience gets larger I won’t have to do that. It’s just a short term method rather than paying for facebook followers.
    Due to that, it’s a bit of a mix where the signups come from at the moment.

    #1195314
    John Romaine
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    I have a love hate relationship with social media for a number of reasons.

    Firstly, its too big to ignore. I post up every day on social (Youtube is my fav) but as Byron mentioned above, it can be a lot of effort in, with very little reward out.

    I sat in on a meeting last Monday with a CEO and a GM. Both said to me “John, this whole social media thing, it seems like nothing more than wank factor”. And to be quite honest, I couldn’t blame them for saying it.

    This business had been in operation for over 45 years.

    How do you tell two business owners that run a multi million dollar business that employs over 600 people that they “have to create interesting content”.

    I know the game has changed, but trying to sell that in a pitch is almost impossible. Infact in some cases its near ridiculous. (Don’t get me wrong, I love creating content – its part of what I teach)

    The bottom line is this….

    Business owners MUST MONETIZE.

    It’s as simple as that.

    Social media seems to trend on vanity metrics that does none of that.

    “Hey, we’ve got 45 followers on Twitter”
    “Our post was viewed 9,000 times”

    Whoopdie do. How much of that nonsense equated into cash or customers?

    There’s a fine line between leveraging a platform (and most importantly monetising it – especially for business) and sitting around circle jerking posting cat videos on Instagram..

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