Home – New Forums Starting your journey Tips On Choosing A Business Name?

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  • #980036
    GSanders12
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    Hey, I’m gonna start a business and have decided to switch up the name of my start-up. I was wondering what tips you would give when it comes to deciding on a company name that will sound enticing enough to bring in the audience that you desire :)

    Thank you

    #1119302
    Divert To Mobile
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    I like Retroactive,

    Sounds enticing and should bring in the right audience.

    Steve

    #1119303
    TheGoldenGoose
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    Hi

    There’s alot of tips and tricks, a few posts I’ve written gives you a little nibble of the wealth of methodology you can use to find a killer brand name.

    Try here and here.

    You can even read about the time we re-named/rebranded as The Golden Goose here. Bit of a case study :)

    #1119304
    dextereugenio
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    tips?

    * dont think about it too hard (seriously)
    * ask other people (this forum)
    * make sure its not already taken or associated with others
    * check the internet for the domain (i think already mentioned)

    i personally dont think the name of a startup would “entice” me to use their service or buy a product as for me, the name is almost an after thought. if you have what i want, but i didnt like your business name, im still going to do business with you.

    i imagine if youre happy with the name, and proud to yell it from the rooftops, that could be almost enough.

    oh and maybe make sure youre not going to be embarrassed by it down the track. i have a couple of friends that had goofy hotmail accounts they decided to turn into business names. bad decision.

    #1119305
    Anonymous
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    One thing that I learned recently at a SEO (Search Engine Optimisaton) seminar is to use the same word for your business name, your search keyword, your domain name and the product or service you provide. This will help rank your website higher in searches.

    #1119306
    UncoverHiddenProfits
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    Hi

    I was just having this conversation with one of my members and I suggested to them the first thing you need to get very clear on is… what is the problem or frustration or the thing that keeps your target prospect up at night, that your product/service will solve! Then have this in the name of the business.

    Don’t be afraid of having a sentence as you business name. The more accurately you can convey what problem your business solves for your customers the easier it will be for prospects to decide they need to talk to you.

    The reason we don’t speak to each other in single words is we can’t easily communicate our message. I find trying to come up with a single word that gets the message across will generally not work very well and it takes up a lot of time and brain power you could be investing in activity that makes sales or generates leads

    Hope this helps and good luck with your venture

    Mick

    #1119307
    Zava Design
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    dextereugenio, post: 134231 wrote:
    tips?

    * dont think about it too hard (seriously)
    * check the internet for the domain (i think already mentioned)
    This.

    My business name (Zava Design) came from two very simple factors:
    1) Short (hence easy to remember) and with “design” in there somewhere.
    2) The .com domain name was available.

    End of story.

    #1119308
    Anonymous
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    I just can give you the advice that you shouldn’t over think your business name. Follow your guts and play with a few alternatives. Consider your target market and also your product or service, e.g. take parts of it and combine it with something else.

    My business name e.g. is HipLouise. Hip because it is a belly band that protects the hips, waist and kidneys and Louise because it is my favourite female name and fits perfectly as the product is for women. It took me a while to play with the words kidney, hip, belly and waist and I finally ended up with that combination.

    Also check whether the name you choose already exists and if the domain is still available.

    Good luck,

    Claudia
    http://www.hiplouise.com.au

    #1119309
    Anonymous
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    Your business name should tell about your product/service. Just hearing it you will have an idea of what your product or business is about. Plus it should be interesting, enticing and short enough to remember easily.

    #1119310
    Zava Design
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    jeanmaddocks, post: 134922 wrote:
    Your business name should tell about your product/service. Just hearing it you will have an idea of what your product or business is about.
    Really?

    Virgin.
    Nike.
    Coles.
    Optus.
    Apple.
    Zava. ;)

    I think short/catchy and memorable can be just as important, maybe more so.

    #1119311
    legalguy
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    I’ll leave others to provide creative inspiration for your new name and instead, direct my comments to helping you adopt a name that will form an important IP (intellectual property) asset in your business.

    Clearance Searches. Before launching any new brand, always ensure it is available. Simply obtaining a business name, domain name or company registration does NOT mean you have rights to your chosen name. You need to consider whether anyone has pre-existing trade mark rights in your name – or a similar name. This involves an assessment of both registered trade marks and unregistered trade marks.

    It happens all the time, but starting a new business venture by defending a trade mark infringement action isn’t ideal! Talk with your IP Lawyer and Trade Marks Attorney (a not so subtle plug – sorry) about conducting searches of all relevant registers to ascertain (i) risk of infringement; and (ii) your prospects of registration.

    Register your name as a trade mark. As noted above, only a trade mark gives you proprietary rights to your name – i.e. statutory monopoly type rights. A registered trade mark is a powerful asset in any business, for example you can:

    – license your trade mark to third party users (e.g. resellers, franchisees, sponsored persons, merchandising deals etc)
    – sell your trade mark (e.g. drive up the value of the sale price for your business)
    – enforce your trade mark rights against unauthorised users
    – collaborate with Customs to prevent importation of pirated product
    – use your trade mark as security in financial transactions

    Distinctive is best. When choosing a name, think distinctive rather than descriptive. Distinctive trade marks (e.g. Apple for computers) will be easier to register and cheaper and more easily enforced. A distinctive trade mark will be one that doesn’t describe or refer to the attributes of your goods / services.

    Not just words and logos. Trade Mark registration is available for a broad range of distinctive signs including colours, shapes, sounds, scents and more.

    So there you have it, plenty of compelling reasons to adopt a distinctive brand and to protect it via the registered trade mark system.

    Hope these tips help. Good luck!

    [email protected]
    0409 924 294
    run-legal.com

    #1119312
    Matt_Fenwick
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    Some great comments already. Picking up on the ‘getting feedback’ theme.

    Friends, family are a great resource.

    BUT – a good name is the product of a process. Maybe it’s a long analytical investigation, or maybe it’s an intuitive thing as people have suggested – just depends on your personality type.

    Feedback from friends and family may not be informed by this process – you can get some very left-field suggestions.

    When I was choosing my name – True North Writing – I got the best results when I asked very focused questions (eg ‘what does this name make you think of’) rather than open-ended ones (eg, ‘here’s five names, what do you think’).

    Also, I went to them with one name at a time. This makes it easier to get clear feedback on each option.

    You can also check out my blog post on another aspect of business naming – understanding your clients.

    Good luck!

    #1119313
    Zava Design
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    Matt_Fenwick, post: 135554 wrote:
    You can also check out my blog post on another aspect of business naming – understanding your clients.!
    Dude, word of advice, fix up your permalinks structure, big chunk of SEO juice you’re missing out on there. (and if you’re offering a website review service but not having well structured page URLs on your own site, well… :( )

    This custom structure usually works for me: /%category%/%postname%/

    #1119314
    The Hobbit
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    HipLouise, post: 134662 wrote:
    I just can give you the advice that you shouldn’t over think your business name. Follow your guts and play with a few alternatives.
    http://www.hiplouise.com.au
    I agree with HipLouise.
    At the end of the day it’s how you use/market your name that’s important rather than the name itself. Would Google now be a verb if they’d called themselves “Rapid Search Engine” instead? Keep it short, make sure the average bloke can pronounce it.
    Good luck.
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