Home – New Forums Tell me straight… Updated our website – Tell us what you think

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  • #991359
    checkvault
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    Hey everyone,

    We’ve just updated our website. We’re very excited about it and we’d like to get as much feedback as possible. Mostly interested in knowing if as a user it does not take a lot of time to understand
    – what we’re about
    – how to find more information related to you as a user type
    – how to register
    – how to get in contact with us

    And if there is something you feel which is wrong with the content or if there is something which is causing confusion, please do let me know.

    Hope everyone has a great long weekend.

    Hope to hear from everyone soon.

    We updated the website today just about an hour ago and hence the DNS settings may not have completely propagated across the network which may take anywhere between 30 minutes to 3 days. The landing page has ‘Trust is our currency’ in bold letters which should give you the confirmation that you’ve loaded the new website.

    Link to the website – https://www.checkvault.com.au

    #1181172
    Kelly Exeter FS Editor
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    Hey guys – the website looks fantastic!!

    1. One of the very first thing I want a website to tell me when I visit it for the first time is: ‘What is this business about?’ So I love that your logo tells me in the tagline “Payments secured”. And then the first thing I see pop up on the home page is “Safe, simple and secure escrow you can rely on”

    2. So now that I can see you are all about safe and secure payments, I love that the overall professionalism of the design combined with the blue colour palette immediately supports this notion of ‘safe and secure’.

    3. I love that if I have no idea what ‘escrow’ is … the answer to that is easily accessbile.

    4. I love how clear you make the process (Make an offer > secure funds > release when satisfied)

    I have only had a very quick look through the website but on the first pass, it really ticks every box for me. It leads me (the new site visitor) on a clear and logical path through the site and the information is presented in a very easy to process manner.

    I wish I could give you some kind of ‘I’d suggest tweaking this’ kind of feedback because I know that sometimes ‘It’s great!!’ feedback isn’t all that helpful. But truly – you’ve done an amazing job x

    #1181173
    Craig.Smith
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    I would consider upgrading your SSL certificate to an EV. In your industry I think this is added trust to the user.

    #1181174
    JohnW
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    Hi Prathamesh,
    Congrats on getting your new site together. It’s a very tough job.

    You don’t tell us how you propose to promote your site and that should have a dramatic impact on the relevance of suggestions offered here.

    In a nutshell, what I see is lots of pages with very large pictures and with such little information of relevance “above the fold” that I would not scroll down the page to where the important info is located.

    I’d be hitting my back button very quickly.

    IMHO, there are large chunks of mission critical info that is being omitted from each page.

    Eg:

    • Where do you offer your services?
    • Who do you offer them to?
    • Why is the service important to them?
    • How to check you out?

    The content looks like it is going to be written “bass ackwards”.

    On a techie note: You may want to consider the load speed of the site. It requires 77 files and 1.3 megs to load the home page.

    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1181175
    Kelly Exeter FS Editor
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    I always find it interesting when someone says ‘I wouldn’t scroll’ with regard to a website design. The whole concept of ‘putting all the important stuff above the fold’ is now firmly outdated in this day and age. There is an exception to every rule of course – but website viewers are very much willing to scroll these days. Which means that you can use above the fold to state very clearly who you are, what you’re about … and who you want to serve. And if you tick all the right boxes with the person viewing your site (ie, if they’re the person you’re keen to serve), they will scroll to find out more.

    #1181176
    JohnW
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    Kelly Exeter, FS Editor, post: 211494 wrote:
    I always find it interesting when someone says ‘I wouldn’t scroll’ with regard to a website design. The whole concept of ‘putting all the important stuff above the fold’ is now firmly outdated in this day and age. There is an exception to every rule of course – but website viewers are very much willing to scroll these days. Which means that you can use above the fold to state very clearly who you are, what you’re about … and who you want to serve. And if you tick all the right boxes with the person viewing your site (ie, if they’re the person you’re keen to serve), they will scroll to find out more.
    Hi Kelly,
    What some other web users think…

    22 Mar 15: The State of Mobile User Experience
    (From the Nielsen Norman Group)

    “What Designers Still Need to Learn

    So, if RWD (responsive web design) has helped improve mobile usability, does that mean that responsive sites are more usable on mobile? Not necessarily. RWD has made content prioritization and content parity part of the conversation, and overall, mobile design has benefitted. But RWD has also had negative impacts on mobile usability, perhaps the most important being that of the super-long page. Designers were told that the fold doesn’t matter, because, since the screen is so tiny on mobile, what else can users do but scroll? And yes, they scroll, but only if they are enticed to.

    “What It Means for Desktop Users

    Unfortunately I could write pretty much the opposite article about the influence of responsive design on the usability of desktop sites. The idea of starting RWD by designing for mobile has been great for mobile, but quite catastrophic for the desktop. We’ve lately seen on the desktop long pages devoid of information, hidden navigation and search, as well as big images and a poorly understood concept of prioritizing the content over chrome. Unfortunately we cannot design with only one device in mind when users are distributed across multiple platforms: we need to take into account the specifics and the strengths of each device and tweak our designs so they match the capacity of the communication channel with that device.”

    The article above is based on…

    “our (NNG) findings from 15 series of usability studies with users in 6 countries (mostly in the USA, but also in Australia, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, Romania, and the UK). It presents a set of design recommendations intended to help designers create a good mobile user experience.”

    Perhaps we will be entering into an era where the first design brief questions to be asked will be:

    • Are we designing this home page for desktop/tablet users or mobile phone users?
    • What pages are primarily for mobile phone users?

    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1181177
    MatthewKeath
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    Kelly Exeter, FS Editor, post: 211494 wrote:
    I always find it interesting when someone says ‘I wouldn’t scroll’ with regard to a website design. The whole concept of ‘putting all the important stuff above the fold’ is now firmly outdated in this day and age. There is an exception to every rule of course – but website viewers are very much willing to scroll these days. Which means that you can use above the fold to state very clearly who you are, what you’re about … and who you want to serve. And if you tick all the right boxes with the person viewing your site (ie, if they’re the person you’re keen to serve), they will scroll to find out more.I tend to agree.

    Give them a reason and they will scroll.

    I think this site does that well.

    #1181178
    MatthewKeath
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    JohnW, post: 211500 wrote:
    Hi Kelly,
    What some other web users think…

    22 Mar 15: The State of Mobile User Experience
    (From the Nielsen Norman Group)

    “What Designers Still Need to Learn

    So, if RWD (responsive web design) has helped improve mobile usability, does that mean that responsive sites are more usable on mobile? Not necessarily. RWD has made content prioritization and content parity part of the conversation, and overall, mobile design has benefitted. But RWD has also had negative impacts on mobile usability, perhaps the most important being that of the super-long page. Designers were told that the fold doesn’t matter, because, since the screen is so tiny on mobile, what else can users do but scroll? And yes, they scroll, but only if they are enticed to.

    “What It Means for Desktop Users

    Unfortunately I could write pretty much the opposite article about the influence of responsive design on the usability of desktop sites. The idea of starting RWD by designing for mobile has been great for mobile, but quite catastrophic for the desktop. We’ve lately seen on the desktop long pages devoid of information, hidden navigation and search, as well as big images and a poorly understood concept of prioritizing the content over chrome. Unfortunately we cannot design with only one device in mind when users are distributed across multiple platforms: we need to take into account the specifics and the strengths of each device and tweak our designs so they match the capacity of the communication channel with that device.”

    The article above is based on…

    “our (NNG) findings from 15 series of usability studies with users in 6 countries (mostly in the USA, but also in Australia, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, Romania, and the UK). It presents a set of design recommendations intended to help designers create a good mobile user experience.”

    Perhaps we will be entering into an era where the first design brief questions to be asked will be:

    • Are we designing this home page for desktop/tablet users or mobile phone users?
    • What pages are primarily for mobile phone users?

    Regs,
    JohnW

    And yes, they scroll, but only if they are enticed to.

    I think that is an important quote.

    Design is all about enticing people to do something.

    P.S That article is almost impossible to read on a mobile – they might want to take their own advice.

    #1181179
    checkvault
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    JohnW, post: 211491 wrote:
    Hi Prathamesh,
    In a nutshell, what I see is lots of pages with very large pictures and with such little information of relevance “above the fold” that I would not scroll down the page to where the important info is located.

    You have raised a point which was definitely part of our discussion when we were putting together the content.

    I guess one ‘rule’ or you can say ‘assumption’ we had was that visitors weren’t going to read a lot of text. And hence putting together everything about that particular page in no more than 6 to 7 words at the top with a picture was the plan we went with. Hence you may have raised this point that there isn’t a lot of detail at the very top.

    The front page is kept very generic because given the nature of the service and it’s use across individuals, businesses and marketplaces. One point I’d like to share is that keeping the ‘authority’ principle in mind from Caldini’s six points of influence, we did decide to keep our media representations and associations as close to the top (whether they’re above the fold was dependent on the device) so that it builds confidence in our brand if a visitor does not know about CheckVault.

    JohnW, post: 211491 wrote:
    Where do you offer your services?

    Yes, I think this is a point we’ll look into and make it more obvious via the front page.

    JohnW, post: 211491 wrote:
    • Who do you offer them to?
    • Why is the service important to them?

    I believe by laying the options for ‘Individuals’, ‘Businesses’ and ‘Marketplaces’ and a short description below each on the front page, a user should be able to understand the types of users CheckVault can have.

    JohnW, post: 211491 wrote:
    How to check you out?

    We’ve ensured we’ve kept a CTA on each page, so if they’d like to find out more or are sold that there’s a link or button they can click to continue. This is something we’ll fine tune as we observe how users navigate through the site, but this is something we did keep in mind while planning and implementing the layout.

    JohnW, post: 211491 wrote:
    On a techie note: You may want to consider the load speed of the site. It requires 77 files and 1.3 megs to load the home page.

    In terms of the items being loaded, we are looking into combining a lot of our .js and .css files into larger chunks which should save loading time.

    JohnW, post: 211491 wrote:
    You don’t tell us how you propose to promote your site and that should have a dramatic impact on the relevance of suggestions offered here.

    Up until this point our service was very ‘Construction’ industry oriented and hence previous versions of our website had a lot of images of people in construction, buildings in the background etc. which gave an idea to the visitor where our services are being promoted. But since we started receiving interest from a lot of other industries, we decided to go with a broader approach and since the service can be used in any industry where goods and services are being exchanged, those would be the areas where we wish to promote our service.

    I really do appreciate the feedback so far. Please do offer any suggestions or shortcomings (technical or layout specific) you may come across, and we’d be truly grateful.

    Kind regards,

    #1181180
    JohnW
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    MatthewKeath, post: 211508 wrote:
    I think that is an important quote.

    Design is all about enticing people to do something.
    Hi Matt,
    My point exactly…

    Hi Prathamesh,
    IMHO, there is a danger that the broad stats about the now ubiquitous mobile phone ownership is swamping your good Internet marketing decisions.

    Just because most of us have a mobile phone on us does not mean that we are looking for the same sort of information on it as you may want to deliver to selected types of potential business customers in their offices using desktops or tablets.

    The first questions I would ask about your business are:

    • How are you trying to attract potential clients to your site?
    • Where will they be when trying to access your messages?
    • What information will they be trying to access?

    Here are some Feb/Mar 2015 mobile phone access numbers for a small sample of business website categories:

    Entertainment sites = 52% mobile
    Offline retailers = 39% mobile
    Alternative medicine clinics = 29% mobile
    Finance/Business services = 23% mobile
    Catering service = 17%
    B2B wholesaler = 11%
    Industrial manufacturer = 11%
    Web designers = 8%

    If you think the potential visitors to your type of business are likely to be searching in their offices and therefore on desktops/laptops, you may find mobile phone users are only around 10% of your audience.

    So, should you orient your site design and content priority around desktop or mobile phone? At present, it appears to be totally oriented to phone users.

    The referenced article suggests that responsive design is essentially a compromise solution. (I could throw many other references into this discussion.)

    My question for you is, which should generate the best returns, a compromise oriented towards desktop/tablet or to a mobile phone design?

    PS: I suggest anyone who claims to be interested in mobile website design/development should read this latest Pew research:

    1 Apr 15: U.S. Smartphone Use in 2015

    It can be viewed as a number of very, very long mobile pages, as a 59 page PDF file or I suggest folk will find it is much easier to read on a desktop.

    It also seems to be a good example of the problems of mobile vs desktop pages…
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1181181
    JohnW
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    Hi Prathamesh,
    Our posts crossed over. Mine was written before I saw your reply above…

    Attempting a detailed discussion in a forum is impossible. All I can suggest are some thoughts/ideas.

    I’ve got to respond to this one…

    checkvault, post: 211540 wrote:
    You have raised a point which was definitely part of our discussion when we were putting together the content.

    I guess one ‘rule’ or you can say ‘assumption’ we had was that visitors weren’t going to read a lot of text. And hence putting together everything about that particular page in no more than 6 to 7 words at the top with a picture was the plan we went with.

    IMHO, this assumption is incorrect. People want info that will solve their problems, save them time, make them money, protect their interests, etc.

    They will read a lot of RELEVANT info about these topics and they may revisit this sort of info over time as they progress through their purchasing process.

    People may take years to finalise a purchasing decision or they may do it in a split second in a supermarket isle.

    I don’t know the ESCROW market.

    I look at your site and I see you potentially have info for:

    Partners
    Affiliates
    Businesses
    Individuals

    The sub-category of “businesses” must have almost infinite variations. That implies you need to explain your services’ benefits to retailers, tradies, professionals, B2B marketers, e-com business, etc., etc. None of this is on your site.

    The best advice I can offer is to suggest you change your site into a series of landing pages aimed at each of the important target users. Answer their RELEVANT questions on their landing pages and invite them to act from there.

    IMHO, they will read a lot of information if it is RELEVANT to them.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1181182
    Kelly Exeter FS Editor
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    PS Checkvault team – this website is also quite good for getting a ‘random person off the street’ point of view on the usability of your website design:

    http://peek.usertesting.com/

    Peek is all about the User and every time I’ve used it for a site it’s thrown up some interesting stuff. Not necessarily stuff I would implement every time … but still, interesting stuff that I (someone who’s been designing websites for 15 years so views all websites through that filter) wouldn’t see

    #1181183
    checkvault
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    Kelly Exeter, FS Editor, post: 211550 wrote:
    PS Checkvault team – this website is also quite good for getting a ‘random person off the street’ point of view on the usability of your website design:

    http://peek.usertesting.com/

    Peek is all about the User and every time I’ve used it for a site it’s thrown up some interesting stuff. Not necessarily stuff I would implement every time … but still, interesting stuff that I (someone who’s been designing websites for 15 years so views all websites through that filter) wouldn’t see

    Wow. That’s great. I’ve submitted our site for testing. It’d be interesting to see the response. I’ll post it here so guys can see what it looks like.

    Cheers,

    #1181184
    Tracey G
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    Some interesting discussions here.

    Prathamesh, I like the new website and how it functions. I have only one small thing to add as feedback: it’s related to your CTA (call to action) buttons.

    I think the CTA buttons lower down on each page currently don’t stand out enough (mid-green on a mid-blue background). Perhaps use a lighter shade of green, or switch to orange.

    I noticed that you have a light orange CTA button above the fold on the Individuals page. This looks good, and it would be good to have all of the CTA buttons the same shade for consistency.

    Also, I would include a CTA above the fold on the Business, Construction and Marketplace pages too, exactly the same as you have for the Individuals page.

    #1181185
    checkvault
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    Tracey G, post: 211623 wrote:
    Some interesting discussions here.

    Prathamesh, I like the new website and how it functions. I have only one small thing to add as feedback: it’s related to your CTA (call to action) buttons.

    I think the CTA buttons lower down on each page currently don’t stand out enough (mid-green on a mid-blue background). Perhaps use a lighter shade of green, or switch to orange.

    I noticed that you have a light orange CTA button above the fold on the Individuals page. This looks good, and it would be good to have all of the CTA buttons the same shade for consistency.

    Also, I would include a CTA above the fold on the Business, Construction and Marketplace pages too, exactly the same as you have for the Individuals page.

    Hey Tracey,

    There were a couple of debates on the colour of the CTA buttons when we were picking them out. I chose green because it’s synonymous to ‘start’ or ‘go’, like the traffic lights on the street.

    And since you’ve raised the point, I found this web-page here (http://www.paulolyslager.com/call-to-action-buttons-psychology-color/) and there’s a colour wheel down the page which suggests to use colours on the opposite sides for CTA. So since our website is pre-dominantly blue, the orange CTA is the right choice (as orange is on the opposite side of blue in the wheel – good recommendation there Tracey).

    We wanted to allow users to go through the information so that they understood what the service is and find out as much as they wanted before they made the decision to ‘get started’. So that’s why the CTA’s were pre-dominantly kept at the bottom. The ‘Get started’ always hovers at the top in the menu. But agreeing to your input there, I’ll keep the ones at the bottom (make them orange) and add the orange ‘get started’ buttons at the top as well.

    Thanks for your recommendations again :)

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